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The Impact of Religiousness on Substance Use and Depression.

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This longitudinal study evaluated the effect of religiousness on substance use and depression both currently and after six months. It also evaluated the association between religious coping on substance use and depression both currently and after six months. Results reveal no relationship between religiousness and current substance use. There was equally no relationship between religiousness and substance use after six months. There was a direct relationship between religiousness and current depression in the sense that those who reported religiousness were also those who reported current depression. There was equally a direct relationship between religiousness and depression after six months. On religious coping, there was an inverse relationship between religious coping and current substance use, such that those who reported religious coping were also those who did not report current substance use. (Contains 14 references.) (GCP)

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Author:Uchendu, Cajetan
Publication:ERIC: Reports
Date:Aug 1, 2002
Words:204
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