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The Hopkins Society fourth annual Hopkins lecture: Hopkins language of prayer and praise.

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 1973 GUSTAVE TUCK THEATRE, UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

MRS. Nowottny was a recognized scholar of comparative literature who wrote about poets and their uses of language. In 1962, she authored a book, The Language Poets Use. In 1966, she delivered the Warton lecture in English poetry for the British Academy, entitled "The Common Privileges of Poetry."

Being a student of literary influences on authorship, in coming to Hopkins, she began her very scholarly lecture with Goethe and Eckermann, setting up a discussion of recurrent Motif in Hopkins's poetry. She acknowledged that for her his poetry is, despite much helpful commentary, "resistant." Still his poetry interested her because she found many instances of literary influence consciously or unconsciously echoed in Hopkins's poetry. In her mapping of literary influences, she started with Virgil, moved on to Shakespeare, then Herder, and a Victorian book on "poetics" by E.S. Dallas. She conjectured that Hopkins might have been familiar with them. She also found echoes of Spenser, Newman, Klopstock, and Herder, to name but some of her associations. She used these and other authors to trace and discuss the possible sources of some of Hopkins's uses of language in his poetry, early and late, all under the rubric of Motif. One is never sure in such a lecture whether these supposed literary ricochets are sites of literary enrichment or evidence of imaginative duress. Nowottny does acknowledge that, although some of her literary associations may be wide of the mark, her lecture demonstrated a very close attention to the richness of Hopkins's use of language.

THE HOPKINS SOCIETY FOURTH ANNUAL HOPKINS SERMON BY THE RIGHT REVEREND HUGH MONTEFIORE, BISHOP OF KINGSTON ON THAMES PREACHED AT THE CHURCH OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION, FARM STREET, LONDON, SUNDAY, JUNE 4, 1972 ON THE 128TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH OF GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS

BISHOP Montefiore was a graduate of St. John's College, Oxford. After service in World War II, he began a long career in the Anglican Church. He was a chaplain and tutor to various bishops and a lecturer in the New Testament at Cambridge University. Over the years he published a dozen books on religious subjects. He became Vicar of Great Saint Mary's Church in 1968, and later, Bishop of Kingston on the Thames.

His brief sermon takes up the joy found in poetry that comes from spiritual intuitions of the natural world. He asserted that this was particularly true of Hopkins, whose whole consciousness was engaged with "the ground of being." The Bishop was not much interested in what he called Hopkins's "system," that is, Hopkins's hermeneutical philosophy and the theology in his spritual writings. Rather, the Hopkins he celebrated is the poet of the physical world wherein he regularly discovered the melding of the natural and the supernatural. While the Bishop praised the joy of Galilee in Hopkins's poetic vision, he also acknowledged the sorrow of Gethsemane in the last poetry, seeing a Jobian strain rising out of a failed outward life. Joy and sorrow, he asserted, produced the "immortal diamond" that is the sum of Hopkins's life as a priest and poet.
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Title Annotation:Gerard Manley Hopkins
Publication:Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature
Geographic Code:4EUUK
Date:Jun 22, 2005
Words:522
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