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The Compleat Mustard.

THE COMPLEAT MUSTARD

by Rosamond Man and Robin Weir. 275 pages with index. Price: 12.95 [pounds]. (UK: Constable & Co Ltd).

After pepper, mustard is the world's second most important spice and unlike the others it grows so well that it has not caused conflict. Mustard has been known from time immemorial and man has used if for a very long time. Down the ages various culinary uses have been found for it and nearly every European country boasts its own speciality. Add to this the fact that mustard contains many useful nutrients and it is easy to see why it is widely cultivated and used. For instance, mustard contains 25 percent protein, 29 percent fat and useful quantities of calcium salts, phosphorus, magnesium and sulphur. It also contains vitamin B but in rather small quantities. Such a list of constituents demonstrates why mustard has also been used extensively in medicines, both ancient and modern.

Following chapters entitled Botany and horticulture; Mustard and medicine; Commercial mustard makers - Dijon; Paris and provinces; England and the United States; and Making mustard at home, the authors turn their attention to the use of this spice in conjunction with various food types. Thus, one finds chapters on sauces, soups, starters, fish, chicken and turkey, game, beef, lamb and mutton, pork, offal and veal, vegetables and pickles, and puddings et al. The book, which finishes with a useful bibliography and a full index, explains the complete range of mustards, how mustard is made commercially, traces the histories of the companies making mustard in France, England and the USA, and provides considerable detail on how to use this spice with foods.
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Copyright 1990 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Food Trade Review
Article Type:Book Review
Date:Aug 1, 1990
Words:275
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