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The Chocolaty Fat from the Borneo Illipe Trees.

THE CHOCOLATY FAT FROM THE BORNEO ILLIPE TREES

The Borneo Illipe butter is a wild fat extracted from many species of the Shorea tree, and there at least thirteen fruit-bearing varieties of commercial significance. The Borneo Illipe trees, the Diptercarpaceae, grow in many parts of the Asian subcontinent. Interest in this tree and its fat content really stems from the time in the early 1950s when the price of cocoa butter increased by leaps and bounds, although some nuts had been exported from around the turn of the century. Illipe butter, after suitable treatment, can be used to replace cocoa butter in confectionery products when it is used as part of a mix of oils or fats to create a cocoa butter equivalent. A number of oil and fat processors around the world now utilise this fat product to create their own branded products. Two years ago the total crop of Illipe nuts harvested in Borneo would have been in excess of 50,000 tons but for a plague of grasshoppers doing so much damage.

This text covers the complete subject and deals with the problems of husbandry, dehydration and pests as well as detailing how extraction is carried out for export and local use. Thus the first chapter deals with the varieties of tree and their distribution, followed by a chapter on the collection, infestation problems, processing and export of Illipe nuts from Indonesia. The next chapter discusses the use of the product of the Illipe tree in the confectionery industry. A further chapter deals with the range of analytical techniques currently used to evaluate Illipe butter. Two other chapters provide colourful illustrations showing the different aspects of the nuts being grown and processed, and a literature survey concerning the Borneo Illipe.

This text features a vast amount of tabular matter and numerous figures showing particular physical attributes of the material in question. Obviously a very specialist book, it is nevertheless a text that must appeal to those in the confectionery business who need as much information as possible about some of their raw materials.
COPYRIGHT 1990 Food Trade Press Ltd.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1990 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Food Trade Review
Article Type:Book Review
Date:Feb 1, 1990
Words:346
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