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The Bulletin Notes.

Law enforcement officers are challenged daily in the performance of their duties; they face each challenge freely and unselfishly while answering the call to duty. In certain instances, their actions warrant special attention from their respective departments. The Bulletin also wants to recognize those situations that transcend the normal rigors of the law enforcement profession.

While on mobile patrol, Officers Rickard Cooper and Gary Ribich of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio, Police Department came upon a crash involving a medical helicopter. As they approached the scene, a man with his clothes on fire ran frantically toward them from the crash site. As Officer Ribich retrieved the fire extinguisher from the police vehicle, Officer Cooper rushed to the individual's aid, instructing him to drop and roll. The officers were able to extinguish the flames. Officer Cooper then noticed a stream of fuel moving along the ground from the crash site toward the officers and their vehicle. As Officer Cooper began running to move the vehicle and Officer Ribich started to pull the man to safety, a loud explosion occurred, propelling Officer Ribich and the victim a short distance away and rocking Officer Cooper. Both officers suffered some temporary hearing loss and Officer Ribich sustained minor leg injuries. Because of the quick thinking and actions of these officers, the victim became the only survivor of a crew of three aboard the helicopter.

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Early one morning while on patrol, Officer William Shepard of the Des Moines, Washington, Police Department detected the odor of smoke in the air. Immediately, Officer Shepard began searching the area for the source of the smoke and noticed a local motel, at near capacity, on fire. Quickly, Officer Shepard requested the aid of fire department personnel and then awoke and evacuated all occupants room-by-room. The individual in the room where the fire originated already was suffering from smoke inhalation. Officer Shepard's prompt and professional response to this crisis saved many lives.

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Nominations for the Bulletin Notes should be based on either the rescue of one or more citizens or arrest(s) made at unusual risk to an officer's safety. Submissions should include a short write-up (maximum of 250 words), a separate photograph of each nominee, and a letter from the department's ranking officer endorsing the nomination. Submissions should be sent to the Editor, FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, FBI Academy, Madison Building, Room 209, Quantico, VA 22135.
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Publication:The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin
Date:Mar 1, 2004
Words:403
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