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The Beat Index 2017.

"The Beat Index" provides a chronicle of recent scholarship, including dissertations, in the field of Beat Studies. The artists and other Beat Generation figures represented here are core to the movement or are associated with then-contemporary and complementary avant-garde poetic movements. Unless otherwise noted, abstracts featured in the "Index" are publisher or author abstracts and may appear in excerpted form. Texts are organized alphabetically according to Beat author and chronologically by date of publication. While the focus is 2017, we have included more recent and earlier works not available at the time previous iterations of the "Index" were published. We intend the "Index" to be as comprehensive as possible. If we have omitted a title, we will greatly appreciate being informed of the omission so that we can include it in the next volume of the journal. Finally, note that some entries are repeated, either because they are joint authored or address more than one Beat author.

The Beat Generation

Belletto, Steven, editor. The Cambridge Companion to the Beats. Cambridge UP, 2017.

An in-depth overview of one of the most innovative and popular literary periods in America, the Beat era. Consummate innovators, the Beats had a profound effect not only on the direction of American literature, but also on models of socio-political critique that would become more widespread in the 1960s and beyond. Bringing together the most influential Beat scholars writing today, this Companion provides a comprehensive exploration of the Beat movement, asking critical questions about its associated figures and arguing for their importance to postwar American letters.

Belletto, Steven. "Five Ways of Being Beat, 1958-59." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Calonne, David Stephen. The Spiritual Imagination of the Beats. Cambridge UP, 2017.

The first comprehensive study to explore the role of esoteric, occult, alchemical, shamanistic, mystical, and magical traditions in the work of 11 major Beat authors. The opening chapter discusses Kenneth Rexroth and Robert Duncan as predecessors and important influences on the spiritual orientation of the Beats. Calonne draws comparisons throughout the book between various approaches individual Beat writers took regarding sacred experience. For example, Burroughs had significant objections to Buddhist philosophy, while Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac both devoted considerable time to studying Buddhist history and texts. This book also focuses on Diane di Prima, Bob Kaufman, Philip Lamantia, and Philip Whalen. In addition, several understudied works such as Gregory Corso's "The Geometric Poem," inspired by Corso's deep engagement with ancient Egyptian thought, are given close attention. Calonne introduces important themes from Gnosticism, Manicheanism, and Ismailism to Theosophy and Tarot, demonstrating how inextricably these ideas shaped the Beat literary imagination.

Dickey, Stephen. "Beats Visiting Hell: Katabasis in Beat Literature." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Grace, Nancy M. "The Beats and Literary History: Myths and Realities." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

__ and Jennie Skerl. "Standing at a Juncture of Planes." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Holladay, Hilary. "Beat Writers and Criticism." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Howard, Kristien The Beat Generation: Hatred for the Hipster. Bokeh Bohemia. 2017.

This essay, split into two arguments, demonstrates the importance of the Bohemian lifestyle and argues the extent of which the Beat Generation had an impact on political and social change.

Hrebeniak, Michael. "Jazz and the Beat Generation." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Inchausti, Robert. Hard to Be a Saint in the City: The Spiritual Vision of the Beats. Shambhala, 2018.

Explores Beat spirituality through excerpts from the writings of the seminal writers of the Beat Generation, going deeper than the Buddhism with which many of the key figures became identified. Theirs is a spirituality where personal authenticity becomes both the content and the vehicle for a kind of refurbished American Transcendentalism.

Johnson, Ronna C. "The Beats and Gender." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Lane, Veronique. The French Genealogy of the Beat Generation: Burroughs, Ginsberg and Kerouac's Appropriations of Modern Literature, from Rimbaud to Michaux. Bloomsbury, 2017.

The Francophilia of the Beat circle in the New York of the mid-1940s is well known, as is the importance of the Beat Hotel in the Paris of the late 1950s and early 1960s, but how exactly did French literature and culture influence in the emergence of the Beat Generation? French modernism did much more than inspire its first major writers. It materially shaped their works, as this comparative study reveals through close textual analysis of William S. Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, and Jack Kerouac's use of French literature and culture, including the poetic realist films of Carne and Cocteau, the existentialist philosophy of Sartre, and the poems and novels of Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Proust, Gide, Apollinaire, St.-John Perse, Artaud, Celine, Genet, and Michaux.

Lee, A. Robert. "The Beats and Race." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

--, editor. The Routledge Handbook of International Beat Literature. Routledge. 2018.

Beat texts including On The Road, "Howl," and Naked Lunch are indisputably essentially America-centered Beat, but they have also had other literary exhalations, which invite far more than mere reception study. These are voices from across the Americas of Canada and Mexico, the Anglophone world of England, Scotland or Australia, the Europe of France or Italy and from the Mediterranean of Greece, the Maghreb, Scandinavia and Russia, together with the Asia of Japan and China. This anthology of essays maps other relevant Beat voices, names, and texts. The scope is hemispheric, Atlantic and Pacific, West and East, giving recognition to the Beat inscribed in languages other than English and reflective of different cultural histories. Likewise the majority of contributors come from origins or affiliations beyond the United States, whether in a different English or languages spanning Spanish, Danish, Turkish, Greek, or Chinese.

Mackay, Polina. "The Beats and Sexuality." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Mitchell, Aaron Christopher. Liminality and "Communitas" in the Beat Generation. Peter Lang, 2017.

Analyzes the literature and lifestyles of the Beat authors Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs, and Allen Ginsberg in regard to the anthropological studies of Victor Turner. The Beats partially separated from society by willingly entering the rites of passage. Liminal symbolism is apparent in their literature, such as in movement, time, space, pilgrimages, and monstrosities. In their liminal stage, they established "communitas" and developed anti-structure, questioning society and proposing to change it in their liminoid literature.

Mortenson, Erik. Translating the Counterculture: The Reception of the Beats in Turkey. Southern Illinois UP, 2018.

Examines the reception of the Beat Generation in Turkey. There, the Beat message of dissent is being given renewed life as publishers, editors, critics, readers, and others dissatisfied with the conservative social and political trends in the country have turned to the Beats and other countercultural forebears for alternatives. Through an examination of a broad range of literary translations, media portrayals, interviews, and other related materials, Translating the Counterculture seeks to uncover how the Beats and their texts are being circulated, discussed, and used in Turkey to rethink the possibilities they might hold for social critique today. By focusing on the ways in which local conditions and particular needs shape reception, Mortenson examines how in Turkey the Beats have been framed by the label "underground literature"; explores the ways they are repurposed in the counterculture-inspired journal Underground Poetix; looks at the reception of Kerouac's On the Road and how that reaction provides a better understanding of the construction of "American-ness"; delves into the recent obscenity trial of William S. Burroughs's novel The Soft Machine and the attention the book's supporters brought to government repression and Turkish homophobia; and analyzes the various translations of Allen Ginsberg's "Howl."

Murnaghan, Sheila and Ralph M. Rosen, editors. Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition. The Ohio State UR 2018.

Despite their self-presentation as iconoclasts, the writers of the Beat Generation were deeply engaged with the classical tradition. Many of them were university-trained and highly conscious of their literary forebears finding in their classical models both a venerable literary heritage and a discourse of sublimity through which to articulate their desire for purity. In this volume, a diverse group of contributors explores for the first time the tensions and paradoxes that arose from interactions between these avant-garde writers and a literary tradition often seen as conservative and culturally hegemonic.

Ouakrim, Hassan. Memoir of a Berber: Brian Jones, Jahjouka Rolling Stones, the Beat Generation in Morocco. Fulton Books, 2017.

During the Beat Generation, Morocco saw a flourishing of arts, political change, and visits by distinguished guests from the West. Encounters between the aspects of the mystical/sacred traditions of Morocco's mixing cultures and emissaries from the West, many who indulged in the newly-opened freedoms and sacred traditions, led variously to works of genius, momentous cross-cultural encounters, and personal fame and ruin.

Polsky, Ned. Hustlers, Beats, and Others. 1967. Routledge, 2017.

This book, a reissue of Polsky's classic, analyzes deviant branches of American life, dispels misconceptions about them, and throws new light on sociological theory and method. Each chapter radically dissents from one or more mainstream opinions about deviance.

Raskin, Jonah. "Beatniks, Hippies, Yippies, Feminists, and the Ongoing American Counterculture." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Sterritt, David. "The Beats and Visual Culture." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Tietchen, Todd F. "Ethnographics and Networks: On Beat Transnationalism." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Tytell, John. Beat Transnationalism. Beatdom Books, 2017.

Tytell examines the importance of Mexico to the Beat Generation, while recounting via letters from that period to his wife, Mellon, his own experiences in Oaxaca. Also included are essays on Bonnie Bremser, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and Patti Smith, among others.

Torgoff, Martin. Bop Apocalypse: Jazz, Race, The Beats, & Drugs. Da Capo Press, 2017.

Details the rise of early drug culture in America by weaving together the disparate elements that formed this new and revolutionary segment of the American social fabric.

Weinreich, Regina. "Locating a Beat Aesthetic." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Whalen-Bridge, John. "Buddhism and the Beats." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Charles Bukowski

Bukowski, Charles. Storm for the Living and the Dead: Uncollected and Unpublished Poems. Ecco, 2017.

Abel Debritto has curated poems from obscure, hard-to-find magazines, as well as from libraries and private collections all over the country--most of which will be new to Bukowski's readers and some of which have never been seen before.

Johnson, Marguerite. "Radical Brothers-in-Arms: Gaius and Hank at the Racetrack." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

William S. Burroughs

Beaumont, Daniel. "Wake-Up Call: Zizek, Burroughs, and Fantasy in the Sleeper Awakened Plot." Everything You Wanted to Know about Literature but Were Afraid to Ask Zizek, edited and with an introduction by Russell Sbriglia, Duke UP, 2017, pp. 245-266.

Grattan, Sean Austin. "A Grenade with the Fuse Lit: William S. Burroughs and Retroactive Utopias." Hope Isn't Stupid: Utopian Affects in Contemporary American Literature. U of Iowa P, 2017.

Harris, Oliver. "William S. Burroughs: Beating Postmodernism." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Jarvis, Michael. '"All in the Day's Work': Cold War Doctoring and Its Discontents in William Burroughs's Naked Lunch." Literature and Medicine, vol. 35, no. 1, 2017, pp. 183-202.

Treats the institutions and practices of science and medicine, specifically with regard to psychiatry/psychology, as symptoms of a bureaucratic system of control that shapes, constructs, defines, and makes procrustean alterations to both the mind and body of human subjects.

Lawlor, William. "Were Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William S. Burroughs a Generation?" The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Reynolds, Loni. '"The Final Fix' and 'The Transcendent Kingdom': The Quest in the Early Work of William S. Burroughs." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Gregory Gorso

Olson, Kirby. "Beat as Beatific: Gregory Corso's Christian Poetics." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Stephen Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Robert Greeley

Selby, Nick. "Rifling on Catullus: Robert Creeley's Poetics of Adultery." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Diane di Prima

Grace, Nancy M. and Tony Triglio. "Troubling Classical and Buddhist Traditions in Diane di Prima's Lobar Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Robert Duncan

Moul, Victoria. "Robert Duncan and Pindar's Dance." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Bob Dylan

Barker, Derek. Bob Dylan: Too Much Nothing. Red Planet, 2018.

Carpenter, Damian A. Lead Belly, Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, and American Folk Outlaw Performance. Routledge, 2017.

Carpenter traverses the unsettled outlaw territory that is simultaneously a part of and apart from settled American society by examining outlaw myth, performance, and perception over time. Focusing on the works and guises of Lead Belly, Woody Guthrie, and Bob Dylan, Carpenter goes beyond the outlaw figure's heroic associations and expands on its historical (Jesse James, Billy the Kid), folk (John Henry, Stagolee), and social (tramps, hoboes) forms. He argues that all three performers represent a culturally disruptive force, whether it be the bad outlaw that Lead Belly represented to an urban bourgeoisie audience, the good outlaw that Guthrie shaped to reflect the social concerns of marginalized people, or the honest outlaw that Dylan offered audiences who responded to him as a promoter of clear-sighted self-evaluation.

Chicago, Danny. Being Bob Dylan. Bowker, 2017.

Dylan's musical expedition is written about through the eyes of a lifelong fan and Bob Dylan Tribute performer, Danny Chicago. Chicago micro-analyzes Dylan's songs, lyrics, and performances throughout his decades-long career, including his Greenwich Village days, early concerts at Carnegie Hall, the Last Waltz, the 30-Year Anniversary Concert at Madison Square Garden, and the Newport Folk Festival where Dylan blurred the line between folk and rock.

Dylan, Bob. The Nobel Lecture. Simon and Schuster, 2017.

On October 13, 2016, Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, recognizing his countless contributions to music and letters over the last fifty years. Some months later, he delivered an acceptance lecture that is now available in book form.

Goldberg, Michael. "Bob Dylan's Beat Visions (Sonic Poetry)." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Goss, Nina, editor. Tearing the World Apart: Bob Dylan and the Twenty-First Century. UP of Mississippi, 2017.

This collection of essays participates in the creation of the postmillennial Dylan by exploring three central records of the twenty-first century--Love and Theft (2001), Modern Times (2006), and Tempest (2012)--along with the 2003 film Masked and Anonymous, which Dylan helped write and in which he appears as an actor and musical performer. It examines his method and effects through a disparate set of viewpoints. Readers will find a variety of critical contexts and cultural perspectives, as well as a range of experiences from members of Dylan's audience.

Heylin, Clinton. Trouble In Mind: Bob Dylan's Gospel Years--What Really Happened. Lesser Gods, 2017.

Between 1979 and 1981, Dylan produced and released three of his most controversial albums--Slew Train Coming, Saved, and Shot of Love--toured the world, and played the most contentious shows of his career. Remarkably, this entire period was perhaps the most fastidiously well-documented of his career, with every studio session, every live show, and every single rehearsal recorded on Dylan's behalf. Serving as an invaluable companion to the latest Sony Bootleg Series (November 2017), Trouble in Mind is the first book to focus on the life and works of Dylan as a born-again Christian from the perspective of both his artistic growth and the development of his eschatological worldview. It will draw on previously undocumented song drafts, rehearsal tapes, and new interviews with engineers, musicians, and girlfriends.

Hudson, Robert. The Monk's Record Player: Thomas Merton, Bob Dylan, and the Perilous Summer of 1966. Eerdmans, 2018.

In 1965, Thomas Merton fulfilled a 24-year-old dream and went to live as a hermit beyond the walls of his Trappist monastery. Seven months later, after a secret romance with a woman half his age, he was in danger of losing it all. Yet on the very day that his abbot uncovered the affair, Merton found solace in an unlikely place--the songs of Bob Dylan, who, as fate would have it, was experiencing his own personal and creative crises during the summer of 1966. In this parallel biography of two countercultural icons, Hudson explores Dylan's influence on Merton's life and poetry.

Lepidus, Harold. Friends and Other Strangers: Bob Dylan Examined. Oakamoor. 2017.

A collection of more than 120 articles offering an informative and entertaining look at the people who have influenced, been influenced by, or simply hung around in Dylan's orbit at one point or another.

McCarron, Andrew. Light Come Shining: The Transformations of Bob Dylan. Oxford UP, 2017.

Greenwich Village, the student movement of the 1960s and 1970s, Born Again Christians, the Chabad Lubavitch community, or English department postmodernists, and specific intellectual and sociopolitical groups have repeatedly claimed Dylan as their spokesperson. But in the words of filmmaker Todd Haynes, who cast six actors to depict different facets of Dylan's life and artistic personae in his 2009 film I'm Not There, "The minute you try to grab hold of Dylan, he's no longer where he was." In Light Come Shining, McCarron uses psychological tools to examine three major turning points, or transformations, in Dylan's life: the aftermath of his 1966 motorcycle accident, his Born Again conversion in 1978, and his recommitment to song writing and performing in 1987.

Renza, Louis A. Dylan's Autobiography of a Vocation: A Reading of the Lyrics 1965-1967. Bloomsbury, 2017.

Many critics have interpreted Dylan's lyrics, especially those composed during the middle to late 1960s, in the contexts of their relation to American folk, blues, and rock n' roll precedents; their discographical details and concert performances; their social, political and cultural relevance; and/or their status for discussion as "poems." Dylan's Autobiography of a Vocation instead focuses on how all of Dylan's 1965-1967 songs manifest traces of his ongoing, internal "autobiography" in which he continually declares and questions his relation to a self-determined existential summons.

Savage, Craig. "Bob Dylan's American Adam." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 30, no. 3, 2017, pp. 194-197.

Schulte, Dilan Kale. "Ballad Form, Folk History, and Cubist Collage in Bob Dylan's 'Desolation Row.'" NTU Studies in Language and Literature, vol. 37, June 2017, pp. 77-113.

Thomas, Richard. Why Bob Dylan Matters. Dey Street, 2017.

When the Nobel Prize for Literature was awarded to Dylan in 2016, a debate raged. Some celebrated, while others questioned the choice. In Why Bob Dylan Matters, Richard F. Thomas, an expert on classical poetry, discusses his college course on Bob Dylan and makes a compelling case for moving Dylan out of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and into the pantheon of classical poets. Thomas offers an argument for Dylan's modern relevance, while interpreting and decoding Dylan's lyrics for readers.

Wolff, Daniel. Grown-Up Anger: The Connected Mysteries of Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie, and the Calumet Massacre of 1913. HarperCollins, 2017.

A tour de force of storytelling years in the making: a dual biography of two of the greatest songwriters, Dylan and Woody Guthrie, that is also a murder mystery and a history of labor relations and socialism, big business and greed in twentieth-century America--woven together in one epic saga that holds meaning for all working Americans today. In this cultural study, Wolff braids three disparate strands--Calumet, Guthrie, and Dylan--together to create a devastating revisionist history of twentieth-century America. Grown-Up Anger chronicles the struggles between the haves and have-nots, the impact changing labor relations had on industrial America, and the way two musicians used their fury to illuminate economic injustice and inspire change.

Robert Frank

Smith, J.R. American Witness: The Art and Life of Robert Frank. Da Capo, 2017.

The first comprehensive look at the life of a man who's as mysterious and evasive as he is prolific and gifted. Leaving his rigid Switzerland for the more fluid United States in 1947, Frank found himself at the social center of bohemian New York in the '50s and '60s, becoming friends with everyone from Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and Peter Orlovsky, to photographer Walker Evans, actor Zero Mostel, painter Willem de Kooning, filmmaker Jonas Mekas, Bob Dylan, writer Rudy Wurlitzer, jazz musicians Ornette Coleman and Charles Mingus, and more. Frank roamed the country with his young family, taking roughly 27,000 photographs and collecting 83 of them into what is still his most famous work: The Americans. It was harshly criticized upon publication for its portrait of a divided country, but the collection gradually grew to be recognized as an American vision.

Allen Ginsberg

Ginsberg, Allen. The Best Minds of My Generation: A Literary History of the Beats. Edited by Bill Morgan, Grove, 2017.

In 1977, 20 years after the publication of his landmark poem "Howl" and Jack Kerouac's seminal book On the Road, Allen Ginsberg decided it was time to teach a course on the literary history of the Beat Generation. Through the creation of this course, which he ended up teaching five times, first at the Naropa Institute (now University) and later at Brooklyn College, Ginsberg presented the history of Beat literature in his own inimitable way. Compiled and edited by Beat scholar Bill Morgan, and with an introduction by Anne Waldman, The Best Minds of My Generation presents the lectures in edited form, complete with notes, and paints a portrait of the Beats as Ginsberg knew them: friends, confidantes, literary mentors, and fellow revolutionaries.

Grisafi, Patricia Ann. "The Sexualization of Mental Illness in Postwar American Literature." Dissertation Abstracts International, vol. 77, no. 7, Apr. 2017.

Argues that writers during the Cold War period chose to use a rhetorical strategy that associated mental illness with sexuality in order to challenge power structures, especially those regarding gender norms. The dissertation focuses on Jim Thompson, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, and Allen Ginsberg.

Lawlor, William. "Were Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William S. Burroughs a Generation?" The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Mortensen, Erik. "Allen Ginsberg and Beat Poetry." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Pfaff, Matthew. "The Invention of Sincerity: Allen Ginsberg and the Philology of the Margins." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Schumacher, Michael, editor. First Thought: Conversations with Allen Ginsberg. U of Minnesota P, 2017.

With "Howl," Ginsberg became the voice of the Beat Generation. It was a voice heard in some of the best-known poetry of our time--but also in Ginsberg's eloquent and extensive commentary on literature, consciousness, and politics, as well as his own work. Much of what he had to say, he said in interviews, and many of the best of these are collected for the first time in this book. Here we encounter Ginsberg elaborating on how speech, as much as writing and reading, and even poetry, is an act of art.

Tusler, Megan. "American Snapshot: Urban Realism from New Deal to Great Society." Dissertation Abstracts International, vol. 77, no. 8, Feb. 2017.

Argues that realism, however fraught the term, stages scenes of community in order to make claims upon the "real world" in the twentieth century. It identifies and analyzes forms of vernacular realism from 1941 to 1984 as well as aesthetic experiments that consider themselves to mimetically represent the "real world" to reconceive scenes of attachment and counter publics. The third chapter shows how the Beat collective and Allen Ginsberg deploy the photograph and narrative together to give permanence to the historical moment and its attendant political problems. Using Ginsberg's photo texts as primary multimedia objects, the dissertation asks how an aesthetic community "opts out" of its political present by turning to experiments in ways of being and an expansive model of documentation.

Hettie Jones

Anderson, Stephanie. "Three Interviews on Small-Press Publishing: Hettie Jones. Margaret Randall, and Maureen Owen [Special Section]." Chicago Review, vol. 59, no. 1-2, 2014, pp. 78-112.

The interviews with Jones, Margaret Randall, and Maureen Owen draw attention to the roles of women small-press publishers who were active between the 1950s and 1980s, specifically tracing geographical and temporal trajectories. Jones edited and co-published Yugen (1958-62) and ran Totem Press (1958-64) with LeRoi Jones/Amiri Baraka. Due in part to her connections at the Partisan Review, the magazine circulated more widely than other small press publications of the period and became an important venue for writers now associated with the Beat, New York School, and Black Mountain scenes. Randall founded El Corno Emplumado [The Plumed Horn] (1962-69) in Mexico City; issues 1-28 were co-edited with Sergio Mondragon and 30 and 31 with Robert Cohen. Owen founded the magazine Telephone and the press Telephone Books (1969) in New York; the magazine ceased publication in 1983.

Joyce Johnson

Knight, Brenda. "Memory Babes: Joyce Johnson and Beat Memoir." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Jack Kerouac

Beckett, Larry. "2nd Chorus: Blues: Jack Kerouac." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Bliesener, Mark. "Driver." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Burns, Jim. "Jack Kerouac's Jazz Scene." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Field, Douglas."' Straight from the Mind to the Voice': Spectral Persistence in Jack Kerouac and Tom Waits." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Gair, Christopher. "Thalatta, Thalatta!': Xenophon, Joyce, and Kerouac." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Garton-Gundling, Kyle. "Beat Buddhism and American Freedom." College Literature, vol. 44, no. 2, 2017, pp. 200-230.

Investigates the influential cross-cultural adaptation of Buddhist traditions and practices in the works of Gary Snyder, Jack Kerouac, and Tom Robbins. All three promote Americanized Buddhism as an alternative to consumerism. Within a shared commitment to shaping American Buddhism, diversity exists: Snyder sees a harmonious merging of cultures; Kerouac struggles with unresolved conflicts; and Robbins combines cross-cultural openness with ethnically sensitive caution.

George-Warren, Holly. "Light is Faster than Sound: Texans, the Beats and the San Francisco Counterculture." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Goldberg, Michael. "Bob Dylan's Beat Visions (Sonic Poetry)." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Grace, Nancy M. "Detecting Jack Kerouac and Joni Mitchell: A Literary/Legal (not Musicological) Investigation into the Search for Influence." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Hassett, Brian. "Jack Manifested as Music." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Hemmer, Kurt. "Jack Kerouac and the Beat Novel." The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Jago, Marian. "Duet for Saxophone and Pen: Lee Konitz and the Direct Influence of Jazz on the Development of Jack Kerouac's 'Spontaneous Prose' Style." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Johnson, Ronna C. "From Beat Bop Prosody to Punk Rock Poetry: Patti Smith and Jack Kerouac; Literature, Lineage, Legacy." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Jones, Jay Jeff. "Jim Morrison/Angel of Fire." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Lawlor, William. "Were Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William S. Burroughs a Generation?" The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, edited by Steven Belletto, Cambridge UP, 2017.

Lee, A. Robert. "Art Music: Listening to Kerouac's 'Mexico City Blues.'" Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Marion, Paul. "Carrying a Torch for Ti Jean." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Mills, Peter. "Hit the Road, Jack: Van Morrison and On the Road." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Morrison, Simon. "Tramps Like Them: Jack and Bruce and the Myth of the American Road." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Prince, Michael. "Beat Refrains: Music, Milieu and Identity in Jack Kerouac's The Subterraneans, the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film adaptation." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Raskin, Jonah. "Jack Kerouac Goes Vinyl: A Sonic Journey into Kerouac's Three LP's." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Sampas, Jim and Simon Warner. "The Tribute Recordings." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Sullivan, James. "Punk and New Wave." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Theado, Matt. "Kerouac and Country Music." Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner and Jim Sampas, Bloomsbury, 2018.

Warner, Simon and Jim Sampas, editors. Kerouac on Record: A Literary Soundtrack. Bloomsbury, 2018.

The leading light of the Beat Generation writers, Kerouac had a lifelong passion for music, particularly the mid-century jazz of New York City, the development of which he witnessed first-hand during the 1940s with Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, and Thelonious Monk at the fore. Most famous for On the Road (1957), Kerouac admired the sounds of bebop and attempted to bring something of their original energy to his own writing. Yet he was also drawn to American popular music of all kinds--from the blues to Broadway ballads--and when he came to record albums under his own name, he married his unique spoken word style with some of the most talented musicians on the scene. But Kerouac's musical legacy goes well beyond the studio recordings he made himself: his influence infused generations of music makers who followed. Kerouac on Record considers how the writer brought his passion for jazz to his prose and poetry, his own record releases, the ways his legacy has been sustained by numerous more recent talents, those rock tributes that have kept his memory alive, and some of the scores featured in Hollywood adaptations of the adventures he brought to the printed page.

Henry Miller

Burnside, John. On Henry Miller: Or, How to Be an Anarchist. Princeton UP, 2018.

The American writer Henry Miller's critical reputation--if not his popular readership--has been in eclipse at least since Kate Millet's blistering critique in Sexual Politics, her landmark 1970 study of misogyny in literature and art. Burnside argues that Mller's notorious image as a "pornographer and woman hater" has hidden his vital, true importance--his anarchist sensibility and the way it shows us how, by fleeing from conformity of all kinds, we may be able to save ourselves from the "air-conditioned nightmare" of the modern world.

Humphries, David T. "Going off the Gold Standard in Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer." Canadian Review of American Studies [Revue Canadienne D 'Etudes Americaines], vol. 47, no. 2, 2017, pp. 239-260.

Tropic of Cancer (1934) provides a unique modernist representation of the economic warfare of the Great Depression, as evident in Mller's claims for "going off the gold standard." This essay explores what such claims reveal about the connections between economic regimes and the symbolic structures, which underpin both cultural production and the experience of everyday life. In his depiction of prostitution and embodied transactions, Miller offers alternate modes of circulation and currency. In his attempts to create a language and form that "flow," Mller reveals how nationalism, economic strictures, and literary conventions promote hoarding, create conflicts, and mask the experience of everyday life.

Charles Olson

Fletcher, Richard. "Towards a Post-Beat Poetics: Charles Olson's Localism and the Second Sophistic." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Maureen Owen

Anderson, Stephanie. "Three Interviews on Small-Press Publishing: Hettie Jones. Margaret Randall, and Maureen Owen [Special Section]." Chicago Review, vol. 59, nos. 1-2, 2014, pp. 78-112. See entry under Hettie Jones.

Margaret Randall

Anderson, Stephanie. "Three Interviews on Small-Press Publishing: Hettie Jones, Margaret Randall, and Maureen Owen [Special Section]." Chicago Review, vol. 59, nos. 1-2, 2014, pp. 78-112. See entry under Hettie Jones.

Kenneth Rexroth

Nisbet, Gideon. "Kenneth Rexroth: Greek Anthologist." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Ed Sanders

Skerl, Jennie. "Sappho Comes to the Lower East Side: Ed Sanders, the Sixties Avant-Garde, and Fictions of Sappho." Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.

Gary Snyder

Calonne, David Stephen, editor. Conversations with Gary Snyder. UP of Mississippi, 2017.

Snyder is one of the most distinguished American poets, remarkable both for his long and productive career and for his equal contributions to literature and environmental thought. Conversations -with Gary Snyder collects interviews from 1961 to 2015 and charts his developing environmental philosophy and his wide-ranging interests in ecology, Buddhism, Native American studies, history, and mythology.

Hunt, Anthony. '"Instructions' for Attentive Listening: The Rhythms of Gary Snyder's Mountains and Rivers without End." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 30, no. 2, 2017, pp. 67-72.

Explores the use of rhythm in Gary Snyder's long poem Mountains and Rivers Without End, arguing that the rhythmic aspects of the poem must be heard and studied in order for readers to fully connect to the poem. Snyder connects the use of sound and the Buddhist idea of enlightenment, and, Hunt argues, by listening to the "musical composition" of the poem and studying its patterns and sounds readers can better understand the poem's essence and wholeness.

Garton-Gundling, Kyle. "Beat Buddhism and American Freedom. College Literature, vol. 44, no. 2, 2017, pp. 200-230. See entry under Jack Kerouac.

Gonnerman, Mark. "Both Sides Now: On Gary Snyder's This Present Moment." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 30, no. 2, 2017, pp. 88-92.

Gonnerman walks readers through Snyder's This Present Moment, and its main themes. This Present Moment focuses on simplicity and Snyder's Thoreau-like beliefs and dedication to minimizing unnecessary materials, as well as his emphasis on connecting to the wild in order to more fully understand the world and its truths. The article explores Snyder's Buddhist beliefs and the ways in which they appear in his poems.

Martin, Julia. "The Path Which Goes Beyond: Danger on Peaks Responds to Suffering." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 30, no. 2, 2017, pp. 81-87.

Investigates Gary Snyder's reaction to suffering, both personal and "eco-social," in his poem Danger on Peaks. The author argues that Snyder's works, despite increased personal and ecological pain, "foreground lightness and tenderness."

Murphy, Patrick D. "Complexity Integration, Ecocritical Analysis, and Gary Snyder Studies." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 30, no. 2, 2017, pp. 93-100.

Describes complexity integration, or the recognition that fields of study, focusing on literary critics, build on various perspectives and other fields of study in order to gain the most complete understanding of a work. Snyder's works require this detailed approach to avoid reductionism that would distort the meaning. The article also details ecocritical analysis and its relationship to Snyder's works.

Murphy, Patrick D. "Gary Snyder Studies [Special Issue]." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 30, no. 2, 2017, pp. 63-131.

Qiao, Guoqiang. '"The Power-Vision in Solitude': Gary Snyder's Poetic Exploration." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 30, no. 2, 2017, pp. 112-117.

In an interview with Gene Fowler, Snyder advanced the idea of "the power-vision in solitude." For Snyder, the power-vision is 1) the knowledge of self, which for Snyder is power of no-power, 2) the practice of Zen, and 3) the thing that is beyond or "larger" than Zen. These three aspects might not be separate as such but are interrelated and interacting. It is the aim of this essay to arrive at both a specific and a composite view of Snyder's idea of power-vision in his poems.

Qiu, Yan '"Off the Trail': Ecophilosophy and Gary Snyder's Idea of 'The Wild.'" ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 30, no. 2, 2017, pp. 101-111.

Examines the meanings of the term "the wild" in Snyder's works and argues that "the wild" as a concept incorporated multiple ideas, including environmental, Buddhist, and Daoist philosophy, as well as Amerindian mythology, and that this ideological multiplicity is one of the core concepts in Snyder's ecophilosophical thought.

Tan, Joan Qionglin "Walking on Walking: ACodedKuin Gary Snyder's Mountains and Rivers without End." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 30, no. 2, 2017, pp. 73-80.

Whalen-Bridge, John. "Death and Destruction in Snyder's Twenty-First-Century Poems." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews, vol. 30, no. 2, 2017, pp. 118-128.

Explores the way in which Snyder's later works explore death, destruction, and the emptiness that relates to these experiences. It also gives additional background on the Buddhist notion of shunya, or emptiness, and how this notion appears in Snyder's works.

Anne Waldman

Carruthers, A. J. '"Music for Posterity': Afterlives forthe Score in Anne Waldman's The Iovis Trilogy:" Notational Experiments in North American Long Poems, 1961-2011: Stave Sightings. Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.

Philip Whalen

Falk, Jane. "Philip Whalen and the Classics: 'A Walking Grove of Trees.'" Hip Sublime: Beat Writers and the Classical Tradition, edited by Sheila Murnaghan and Ralph M. Rosen, The Ohio State UP, 2018.
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Publication:Journal of Beat Studies
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Date:Jan 1, 2018
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