Printer Friendly

The Arkansas endemic fauna: an update with additions, deletions, a synthesis of new distributional records, and changes in nomenclature.

Abstract.-This study provides an update to the endemic biota of Arkansas by adding 19 species to the state list, including two fungi, three gastropods, one araneid, two opilionids, two pseudoscorpions, one diplopod, three collembolans, two trichopterans, one coleopteran, one dipteran and one hymenopteran. In addition, seven species (one pseudoscorpion, one collembolan, one bivalve, one ephemeropteran, and three trichopterans) are removed from the state list and a synthesis of new distributional records and changes in nomenclature are provided for several species. This update brings to 126 the number of endemic species of the state.

**********

Robison et al. (2008) provided the most recent compilation on the endemic biota of Arkansas. Their update brought to 113 (10 species of plants and 103 species/subspecies of animals) the total number of Arkansas endemic flora and fauna. However, several species were inadvertently overlooked. The following 19 species are added to the list of Arkansas endemics: two fungi, three gastropods, one araneid, two opilionids, two pseudoscorpions, one diplopod, three collembolans, two trichopterans, one coleopteran, one dipteran, and one hymenopteran. In addition, seven species (one pseudoscorpion, one collembolan, one bivalve, one ephemeropteran, and three trichopterans) are removed from the state list; a synthesis of new distributional records are added for two gastropods, one coleopteran, and one amphibian, and changes in nomenclature are provided for three gastropods and two coleopterans. This update brings to 126 the number of endemic species of the state.

LIST OF SPECIES

Material included.-The following is a listing of the species added (Table 1) and removed from the state endemic list, including a synthesis of new distributional records and changes in nomenclature for other endemic biota.
Table 1. Biota added to the state list of endemic species of Arkansas
and counties of occurrence.

Taxon                   County/Counties               Reference

Fungi

  Dictyostelium         Stone                         Landolt et al.
  caveatum                                            (2006)

  Cryptovalsaria        Polk                          Vasilyeva &
  americana                                           Stephenson
                                                      (2007)

Animalia

  Daedalochila          Madison, Newton, Searcy       Coles & Walsh
  bisontes                                            (2006)

  Xolotrema             Independence, Stone           Walsh & Coles
  occidentale                                         (2002)

  Marstonia ozarkensis  Baxter                        Hershler
                                                      (1994)

  Neoleptoneta arkansa  Stone                         Gertsch (1974)

  Crosbyella distincta  Boone                         Goodnight &
                                                      Goodnight
                                                      (1942)

  Crosbyella roeweri    Benton                        Goodnight &
                                                      Goodnight
                                                      (1942)

  Apochthonius          Washington                    Muchmore
  diabolus                                            (1967)

  Apochthonius          Stone                         Muchmore
  titanicus                                           (1976)

  Aliulus carrollus     Benton, Carroll, Searcy,      Hoffman (1999)
                        Washington

  Typhlogastrura        Independence                  Christiansen &
  fousheensis                                         Wang (2006)

  Pygmarrhopalites      Newton                        Zeppelini et
  youngsteadti                                        al. (2009)

  Pygmarrhopalites      Newton                        Zeppelini et
  buffaloensis                                        al. (2009)

  Cheumatopsyche        Garland, Montgomery, Polk     Moulton &
  robisoni                                            Stewart (1996)

  Lepidostoma lescheni  Logan, Montgomery             Moulton et al.
                                                      (1999)

  Heterosternuta        Howard, Izard, Newton, Pike,  Longing &
  ouachitus             Randolph, Searcy, Sharp *     Hazzard (2009)

  Atomosia arkansensis  Hempstead                     Barnes (2008)

  Idris leedsi          Johnson                       Masner & Denis
                                                      (1996)

* There are natural heritage records that also exist for Johnson and
Pope counties (NatureServe 2009).


Additions to the State Endemic Fauna

Fungi, Mycetozoa, Dictyosteliaceae

Dictyostelium caveatum Waddell 1982

This cellular slime mold was described by Waddell (1982) from a single isolate found on bat guano in total darkness in Blanchard Springs Caverns, Stone County, Arkansas. It is considered to be a true Arkansas endemic found in a single Ozark cave to date (Landolt et al. 2006).

Sordariomycetes

Cryptovalsaria americana Vasilyeva & Stephenson 2007

This fungus was described by Vasilyeva & Stephenson (2007) from specimens collected from the Ouachita Mountains Biological Station, 6.5 km west of Big Fork, Polk County, Arkansas. Collections of C. americana were taken from the living bark of hazel alder (Alnus serrulata).

Animalia, Mollusca, Gastropoda, Polygyridae

Daedalochila (syn. Millerelix) bisontes Coles & Walsh 2006

The Buffalo River liptooth, Daedalochila bisontes was previously thought to be D. (Millerelix) peregrina from specimens deposited in the Causey collection at the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville and the Hubricht collection at the Field Museum of Natural History-Chicago (Coles & Walsh 2006). It is considered imperiled (G2) in rounded global status (NatureServe 2009). The species inhabits limestone outcrops in the Ozarks, including Madison, Newton, and Searcy counties (Walsh & Coles 2002; Coles & Walsh 2006).

Xolotrema occidentale (Pilsbry & Ferriss 1907)

The Arkansas wedge, Xolotrema occidentale (syn. Triodopsis occidentalis) is known only from Independence and Stone counties, Arkansas (Pilsbry & Ferriss 1907; Walsh & Coles 2002). This snail is considered critically imperiled (G1) in rounded global status by NatureServe (2009) and a species of special concern in the state by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (Anonymous 2004).

Hydrobiidae

Marstonia ozarkensis (Hinkley 1915)

The Ozark pyrg, Marstonia ozarkensis (formerly Pyrgulopsis ozarkensis) is known only from the type locality, the North Fork of the White River above Norfolk, Baxter County, Arkansas (Hershler 1994). Thompson & Hershler (2002) re-evaluated eastern North American species assigned to Pyrgulopsis and recognized them as distinct species of the genus Marstonia. Interestingly, Wu et al. (1997) lists a single site on the North Fork of the White River in Ozark County, Missouri for M. ozarkensis. However, efforts to relocate this species beyond the single reported location in Missouri have been unsuccessful (Natureserve 2009). This snail has also likely been extirpated in Arkansas (Wu et al. 1997). It is considered G1 in rounded global status (NatureServe 2009) and a species of special concern in Arkansas (Anonymous 2004).

Arthropoda, Araneae, Leptonetidae

Neoleptoneta arkansa (Gertsch 1974)

This troglophilic spider was described by Gertsch (1974) from Blanchard Springs Caverns, Stone County, Arkansas. Dorris (1985) included the species as Leptoneta arkansa in her checklist of Arkansas spiders.

Opiliones, Phalangodidae

Crosbyella distincta Goodnight & Goodnight 1942

This harvestman (an eyeless obligate cavernicole) was described by Goodnight & Goodnight (1942) from specimens collected in Wagler's Cave near Harrison, Boone County, Arkansas. It is considered critically imperiled (S1) in the state (NatureServe 2009).

Crosbyella roeweri Goodnight & Goodnight 1942

This harvestman species was described by Goodnight & Goodnight (1942). Specimens were collected in Tom Danforth Cave, Benton County, Arkansas. This is an eyed troglophile that is considered S1 in Arkansas (NatureServe 2009).

Pseudoscorpiones, Chthoniidae

Apochthonius diabolus Muchmore 1967

Muchmore (1967) described A. diabolus from a single male specimen from Devil's Den Cave at Devil's Den State Park, Washington County, Arkansas. This obligate cavernicole is considered S1 in the state (NatureServe 2009).

Apochthonius titanicus Muchmore 1976

This pseudoscorpion was described by Muchmore (1976) from individuals collected from Blanchard Springs Caverns, 5.6 km east of Fifty Six, Stone County, Arkansas. Specimens were found under a piece of paper near "The Titans". This obligate cavernicole is considered S1 in Arkansas (NatureServe 2009).

Diplopoda, Julida, Parajulidae

Aliulus carrollus Causey 1950

This milliped was included as a state endemic by Robison & Allen (1995) but inadvertently overlooked and not included by Robison et al. (2008). The species was reported by Robison & Allen (1995) from Carroll and Washington counties. However, additional specimens have been reported from Benton and Searcy counties (Hoffman 1999). The species may eventually be found in adjacent states as the type locality (Blue Spring, Carroll County) is just south of the Missouri line (Causey 1950) and sites in Benton and Washington counties are close to eastern Oklahoma.

Hexapoda, Collembola, Hypogastruridae

Typhlogastrura fousheensis Christiansen & Wang 2006

This springtail species was described by Christiansen & Wang (2006) from Foushee Cave, Independence County, Arkansas. A single adult was collected by Norman and Jean Youngsteadt in May 1978. Additional adult specimens were collected 27 years later by the same collectors from bat guano in the same cave on 18 March 2005 (Christiansen & Wang 2006).

Arrhopalitidae

Pygmarrhopalites youngsteadtii Zeppelini, Taylor & Slay 2009

Specimens of this springtail species were collected from Tom Barnes Cave, Newton County, Arkansas (Zeppelini et al. 2009). This cave is located in the Ozarks within the Buffalo National River.

Pygmarrhopalites buffaloensis Zeppelini, Taylor & Slay 2009

The holotype was collected from Walnut Cave, Newton County, Arkansas (Zeppelini et al. 2009). This cave is located near the Buffalo River, about 26 km upstream from the cave where P. youngsteadtii was collected.

Trichoptera, Hydropsychidae

Cheumatopsyche robisoni Moulton & Stewart 1996

This caddisfly was described by Moulton & Stewart (1996) from specimens collected from Strawn Spring, 0.8 km east of Caddo Gap, Montgomery County, Arkansas. Additional specimens of C. robisoni were collected from other sites in Garland, Montgomery and Polk counties, Arkansas (Moulton & Stewart 1996). It appears this species is endemic to small, spring-fed streams in the Ouachita Mountain physiographic subregion. With additional collecting, C. robisoni may be found just across the border in LeFlore County, Oklahoma (along Rich Mountain) as specimens are available from sites just to the east. This species is considered critically imperiled (G1) in rounded global status (NatureServe 2009).

Lepidostomatidae

Lepidostoma lescheni Bowles, Mathis & Weaver 1994

A single male L. lescheni was collected from Slocum Spring on Mt. Magazine, Logan County, Arkansas, and described by Bowles et al. (1994). Additional specimens (both males and females) were collected from several sites in seep locations in the central Ouachita Mountain region of the state in Montgomery County (Moulton et al. 1999). A report (Weaver 2002) of the species from Missouri and Oklahoma is erroneous (S. R. Moulton II pers. comm.). However, additional collecting may reveal populations in similar seep areas of eastern Oklahoma. This species is considered G1 in rounded global status (NatureServe 2009).

Coleoptera, Dytiscidae

Heterosternuta ouachitus (Matta &Wolfe 1979)

The species was originally described as Hydroporus ouachitus by Matta & Wolfe (1979). The subgenus Heterosternuta was elevated to generic status by Matta & Wolfe (1981). The species was originally reported from sites in the Ouachita Mountains (Matta & Wolfe 1981). However, Pippenger & Harp (1985) reported the range of H. ouachitus reaches into the Ozark Mountains (Janes Creek, Randolph County). More recently, Harp & Robison (2006) reported H. ouachitus from the Strawberry River system in Izard and Sharp counties. Additional specimens were reported from Long Creek (Searcy County), Beech Creek (Newton County), and West Lafferty Creek (Izard County) by Longing & Haggard (2009). Interestingly, Wolfe (2000) mentioned in couplets of keys to Heterosternuta beetles, H. ouachitus probably occurs outside of Arkansas; however, specimens have not yet been collected from adjacent states or elsewhere (S. D. Longing, pers. comm.). The species is considered imperiled (S2) in the state (NatureServe 2009).

Diptera, Asilidae

Atomosia arkansensis Barnes 2008

This robber fly was described by Barnes (2008) from specimens collected in blackland prairie at Grandview Prairie Wildlife Management Area near Columbus, Hempstead County, Arkansas. The species is ranked S1 in the state (NatureServe 2009) due to its limited range.

Hymenoptera, Scelionidae

Idris leedsi Masner & Denis 1996

A parasitoid wasp, Idris leedsi was described from a single female collected using yellow pan traps from Baker Spring, 35.4 km NW of Clarksville, Johnson County, Arkansas (Masner & Denis 1996). Scelionids are solitary primary parasitoids of eggs of various spiders (Johnson 1992).

Species Removed from the State Endemic Fauna

Bivalvia, Unionidae

Villosa arkansasensis (Lea 1862)

The Ouachita creekshell was reported to be an Arkansas endemic by Robison & Allen (1995) from Clark, Garland, Howard, Montgomery, Pike, Polk and Saline counties. In addition, it was subsequently listed as an endemic by Robison et al. (2008). However, Galbraith et al. (2008) report specimens of V. arkansasensis from the Little River system of McCurtain County, Oklahoma. It is a species of special concern in Arkansas (Anonymous 2004).

Pseudoscorpiones, Neobisiidae

Tartarocreagris ozarkensis (Hoff 1945)

This pseudoscorpion was described as Microcreagis ozarkensis by Hoff (1945) from specimens collected from Devil's Den State Park and Farmington, Washington County, Arkansas (Hoff 1945). The species (=M. ozarkensis) was included as an Arkansas endemic by Allen (1988), Robison & Allen (1995) and Robison et al. (2008). It is now known from additional localities in Arkansas (Clark and Pulaski counties) and Latimer County, Oklahoma (Muchmore 2001), and is ranked S1 in the state (NatureServe 2009).

Collembola, Entomobryidae

Pseudosinella dubia Christiansen 1960

Christiansen (1960) described this troglobitic springtail from specimens collected from Devil's Den Kitchen Cave, Devil's Den Cave, and Granny Dean Cave, Washington County, Arkansas. It was again reported from Devil's Den Cave by Peck & Peck (1982). Subsequently, the species was reported from a cave in Dent County, Missouri, and a cave in Adair County, Oklahoma (Slay et al. 2009).

Ephemeroptera, Ephemerellidae

Dannella provonshai (McCafferty 1977)

This mayfly was originally described by McCafferty (1977) from specimens collected on the Mulberry River, Johnson County, Arkansas. Robison & Allen (1995) reported it was known only from the type locality and Robison et al. (2008) included D. provonshai in their list of endemics. However, the species has now been reported from Alabama, Kentucky, New York, and Tennessee (McCafferty & Webb 2006; NatureServe 2009; Ogden et al. 2009). In Arkansas, D. provonshai is ranked S1 (NatureServe 2009).

Trichoptera, Helicopsychidae

Helicopsyche limnella Ross 1938

Ross (1938) originally described this caddisfly from an unknown Arkansas county. Unzicker et al. (1970) listed seven sites for H. limnella in Benton, Crawford, Madison, and Washington counties. Robison & Allen (1995) included Benton, Clark, Crawford, Franklin, Garland, Hot Spring, Johnson, Madison, Montgomery, Polk, Saline, and Washington counties in the range of H. limnella. The species was also included in the Arkansas endemic biota list of Robison et al. (2008). However, H. limnella has now been reported from Missouri and Oklahoma (Moulton & Stewart 1996).

Hydroptilidae

Ochrotrichia robisoni Frazer & Harris 1991

This microcaddisfly species was described by Frazer & Harris (1991) from specimens collected from Bear Creek at St. Hwy 7, 3.2 km south of Hollis, Perry County, Arkansas. The species is S1 in Arkansas (NatureServe 2009) and has been reported recently from Oklahoma (Moulton & Stewart 1996).

Psychomyiidae

Paduniella nearctica Flint 1967

This caddisfly was originally described from specimens collected from Devil's Den State Park, Washington County, Arkansas (Flint 1967); additional records include Johnson County, Arkansas (Moulton & Stewart 1996). As such, it was included as a state endemic species by Robison & Allen (1995) and Robison et al. (2008). However, P. nearctica has now been reported from southern Missouri (Moulton & Stewart 1996).

New Distributional Records and/or Changes in Nomenclature

Gastropoda, Polygyridae

Daedalochila (syn. Millerelix) peregrina (Rehder 1932)

The White Liptooth was reported as Polygyra peregrina in Robison & Allen (1995) and Robison et al. (2008). However, Coles & Walsh (2006) found that the diagnostic characters used to define the genus Millerelix sensu Emberton (1995) were unreliable and placed member species into the senior genus Daedalochila Beck. The species is known from Izard, Marion, Newton, Searcy and Stone counties (Robison & Smith 1982). Walsh & Coles (2002) reported D. peregrina from Carroll County. This snail is G2 in rounded global status (NatureServe 2009) and a species of special concern in Arkansas (Anonymous 2004).

Patera clenchi (Rehder 1932)

The Calico Rock oval, P. clenchi was reported by Hubricht (1972) only from a rock slide on Mt. Nebo, Yell County, Arkansas. Robison & Smith (1982), Robison & Allen (1995) and Robison et al. (2008) reported P. clenchi as Mesodon clenchi from Izard and Yell counties. Walsh & Coles (2002) reported two new distributional records for P. clenchi in Searcy and Scott counties. It is considered G1 in rounded global status (NatureServe 2009) and a species of special concern in the state (Anonymous 2004).

Inflectarius magazinensis (Pilsbry & Ferriss 1907)

This Magazine Mountain shagreen is only known to occur on the north slope of Mt. Magazine in the Ozark National Forest of Logan County, Arkansas (Pilsbry & Ferriss 1907). It was listed as an Arkansas endemic by Robison & Smith (1982), Robison & Allen (1995) and Robison et al. (2008) as Mesodon magazinensis. Caldwell (1986) was unable to verify I. magazinensis from the south slope of Mt. Magazine; however, additional specimens were reported from the north slope by Walsh & Coles (2002). Its limited range makes it particularly sensitive to any habitat alteration and it is therefore listed as S1 in Arkansas (NatureServe 2009), as an endangered species in the state (Anonymous 2004), and as a threatened species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on 17 April 1989 (Anonymous 1989).

Coleoptera, Dytiscidae

Heterosternuta sulphuria (Matta & Wolfe 1979)

This predaceous diving beetle was originally described as Hydroporus sulfurus by Matta & Wolfe (1979) and included as an Arkansas endemic by Robison & Allen (1995). The subgenus Heterosternuta was elevated to the generic level by Matta & Wolfe (1981). Specimens of this endemic species were originally collected from Sulphur Springs, Benton County, Arkansas (Matta & Wolfe 1979). Additional historical records include sites in Izard, Newton, and Searcy counties. More recently, however, Longing & Haggard (2009) reported new distributional records for H. sulphuria in Benton, Newton, and Washington counties, including the first report of the species from the entrance of a cave. With additional collecting, this dytiscid may eventually be found outside of Arkansas in adjacent states (S. D. Longing, pers. comm.).

Chordata, Amphibia, Caudata, Plethodontidae

Plethodon caddoensis Pope & Pope 1951

The Caddo Mountain salamander, Plethodon caddoensis was reported to be an Arkansas endemic in Howard, Montgomery, and Polk counties (Robison & Allen 1995). Trauth & Wilhide (1999) reported new geographic records for P. caddoensis from two sites in Pike County. This salamander is considered a species of special concern in the state (Anonymous 2004).

In summary, the present study brings to 126 species the number of endemic biota of Arkansas. Nineteen species have been added to the state list since the last update in 2008. In addition, seven species (one pseudoscorption, one springtail, one bivalve, one ephemeropteran, and three caddisflies) are removed from the state list and a synthesis of new distributional records is added for two endemic gastropods, one endemic coleopteran, and one endemic amphibian. Changes in nomenclature are provided for three endemic gastropods and two endemic coleopterans.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Appreciation is extended to D. Bowles (National Park Service), G. L. Harp (Arkansas State University), G. Leeds (U. S. Forest Service), S. D. Longing (UA-Fayetteville), J. C. Morse (Clemson University), S. R. Moulton, II (U.S. Geological Survey), F. Spiegel (UA-Fayetteville), S. Stephenson (UA-Fayetteville), and J. S. Weaver, III (New Hampshire) for providing information on Arkansas endemics. We also thank S. R. Moulton, II for critically reviewing the manuscript. Funding for MES was provided by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, The Nature Conservancy (Arkansas Field Office), and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Arkansas Ecological Services).

LITERATURE CITED

Allen, R. T. 1988. Additions to the known endemic fauna of Arkansas. Proc. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 42:18-21.

Anonymous. 1989. Endangered and threatened wildlife and plants; determination of threatened status for the Magazine Mountain Shagreen (Mesodon magazinensis). Fed. Reg., 54(72):15206-15208.

Anonymous. 2004. Arkansas endangered, threatened, and species of special concern (January 9, 2004). Arkansas Game & Fish Comm. Rep., Little Rock, Arkansas, 6 pp.

Barnes, J. K. 2008. The genus Atomosia Macquart (Diptera: Asilidae) in North America north of Mexico. Proc. Entomol. Soc. Washington, 110:701-732.

Bowles, D. E., M. L. Mathis & J. S. Weaver, III. 1994. A new species of Lepidostoma (Trichoptera: Lepidostomatidae) from Arkansas, U.S.A. Aq. Insects, 16:249-252.

Caldwell, R. S. 1986. Status of Mesodon magazinensis (Pilsbry and Ferriss), the Magazine Mountain middle-toothed snail. Grant No. 84-1 for Arkansas Nongame Species Preserv. Prog., Little Rock, Arkansas, 18 pp.

Causey, N. B. 1950. New genera and species of millipeds-Paraiulidae (Juloidea). Proc. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 3:45-58.

Christiansen, K. 1960. The genus Pseudosinella (Collembola, Entomobryidae) in caves of the United States. Psyche, 67:1-26.

Christiansen, K. & H. Wang. 2006. A revision of the genus Typhlogastrura in North American caves with description of five new species. J. Cave Karst Stud., 68:85-98.

Coles, B. F. & G. E. Walsh. 2006. Daedalochila sp. nov. from northwest Arkansas, U.S.A., the anatomy of the Polygyra plicata group, and the validity of the genus Millerelix Pratt, 1981 (Gastropoda: Pulmonata: Polygyridae). American Malacol. Bull., 21: 99-112.

Dorris, P. R. 1985. A check-list of spiders of Arkansas. Proc. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 39: 34-39.

Emberton, K. C. 1995. When shells do not tell; 145 million years of evolution in America's polygyrid land snails, with a revision and conservation priorities. Malacologia, 37:69-110.

Flint, O. S., Jr. 1967. The first record of the Paduniellini in the New World. Proc. Entomol. Soc. Washington, 6:310-311.

Frazer, K. S. & S. C. Harris. 1991. Cladistic analysis of the Ochrotrichia shawnee Group (Trichoptera: Hydroptilidae) and description of a new member from the Interior Highlands of northwestern Arkansas. J. Kansas Entomol. Soc., 64:363-371.

Galbraith, H. S., D. E. Spooner & C. C. Vaughn. 2008. Status of rare and endangered freshwater mussels in southeastern Oklahoma. Southwest. Nat., 53:45-50.

Gertsch, W. J. 1974. The spider family Leptonetidae in North America. J. Arachnol., 1:145-203.

Goodnight, C. J. & M. L. Goodnight. 1942. New Phalangodidae (Phalangida) from the United States. American Mus. Nov., 1188:1-18.

Harp, G. L. & H. W. Robison. 2006. Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the Strawberry River system in north-central Arkansas. J. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 60:46-61.

Hershler, R. 1994. A review of the North American freshwater snail genus Pyrgulopsis (Hydrobiidae). Smithsonian Contrib. Zool., 554: 1-115.

Hoff, C. C. 1945. New species and records of pseudoscorpions from Arkansas. Trans. American Micros. Soc., 64: 34-57.

Hoffman, R. L. 1999. Checklist of the millipeds of North and Middle America. Virginia Mus. Nat. Hist. Spec. Publ., 8:1-584.

Hubricht, L. 1972. Endangered land snails of the eastern United States. Sterkiana, 45:33.

Johnson, N. F. 1992. Catalog of the world Proctorupoidea excluding Platygastridae. Mem. American Entomol. Inst., 51:1-825.

Landolt, J. C., S. L. Stephenson & M. E. Slay. 2006. Dictyostelid cellular slime molds from caves. J. Cave Karst Stud., 68:22-26.

Longing, S. D. & B. E. Haggard. 2009. New distribution records of an endemic diving beetle, Heterosternuta sulphuria (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae), in Arkansas with comments on habitat and conservation. Southwest. Nat., 54:357-361.

Masner, L. & J. Denis. 1996. The Nearctic species of Idris Foerster. Part I: The Melleus-group (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae). Canadian Entomol., 128:85-114.

Matta, J. F. & G. W. Wolfe. 1979. New species of Nearctic Hydroporus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae). Proc. Biol. Soc. Washington, 92:287-293.

Matta, J. F. & G. W. Wolfe. 1981. A revision of the subgenus Heterosternuta Strand of Hydroporus Clairville (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae). Pan-Pacific Entomol., 57:176-219.

McCafferty, W. P. 1977. Biosystematics of Dannella and related subgenera of Ephemerella (Ephemeroptera: Ephemerellidae). Ann. Entomol. Soc. America, 70:350-358.

McCafferty, W. P. & J. M. Webb. 2006. Insecta, Ephemeroptera: range extensions and new Alabama state records. Check List, 2:6-7.

Moulton, S. R., II. & K. W. Stewart. 1996. Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of the Interior Highlands of North America. Mem. American Entomol. Inst., 56:1-313.

Moulton, S. R. II., H. W. Robison & B. G. Crump. 1999. The female of Lepidostoma lescheni (Trichoptera: Lepidostomatidae), with new distributional records for the species. Entomol. News, 110:85-88.

Muchmore, W. B. 1967. New cave pseudoscorpions of the genus Apochthonius (Arachnida: Chelonethida). Ohio J. Sci., 67:89-95.

Muchmore, W. B. 1976. New species of Apochthonius, mainly from caves in central and eastern United States (Pseudoscorpionida. Chthoniidae). Proc. Biol. Soc. Washington, 89:67-80.

Muchmore, W. B. 2001. Review of the genus Tartarocreagis, with descriptions of new species (Pseudoscorpionida: Neobisiidae). Texas Mem. Mus., Speleol. Mon., 5:57-72.

NatureServe, 2009. NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life [web application]. Version 7.1. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia. Available at: www.natureserve.org/explorer. Accessed 15 October 2009.

Ogden, T. H., J. T. Osborne, L. M. Jacobus & M. F. Whiting. 2009. Combined molecular and morphological phylogeny of Ephemerellinae (Ephemerellidae: Ephemeroptera), with remarks about classification. Zootaxa, 1991:28-42.

Pilsbry, H. A. & J. H. Ferriss. 1907. Mollusca of the Ozarkian fauna. Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1906:529-556.

Peck, S. B. & J. H. Peck. 1982. Invertebrate fauna of Devils Den, a sandstone cave in northwestern Arkansas. Proc. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 36:46-48.

Pippenger, M. A. & G. L. Harp. 1985. Dytiscidae from Randolph County, Arkansas. Proc. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 39:146-147.

Robison, H. & R. T. Allen. 1995. Only in Arkansas: a study of the endemic plants and animals of the state. Univ. Arkansas Press, Fayetteville, xii + 121 pp.

Robison, H. W. & K. L. Smith. 1982. The endemic flora and fauna of Arkansas. Proc. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 36:52-57.

Robison, H., C. McAllister, C. Carlton & G. Tucker. 2008. The Arkansas endemic fauna: an update with additions and deletions. J. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 62:84-96.

Ross, H. H. 1938. Descriptions of new North American Trichoptera. Proc. Washington Entomol. Soc., 40:117-124.

Slay, M. E., G. O. Graening & D. B. Fenolio. 2009. New state record and western range extension for Pseudosinella dubia Christiansen (Collembola: Entomobryidae) from Oklahoma, U.S.A. Entomol. News, 120:(in press).

Thompson, F. G. & R. Hershler. 2002. Two genera of North American freshwater snails: Marstonia Baker, 1926, resurrected to generic status, and Floridobia, new genus (Prosobranchia: Hydrobiidae: Nymphophilinae). The Veliger, 45:269-271.

Trauth, S. E. & J. D. Wilhide. 1999. Status of three plethodontid salamanders (genus Plethodon) from the Ouachita National Forest of southwestern Arkansas. J. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 53:125-137.

Unzicker, J. D., L. Argus & L. O. Warren. 1970. A preliminary list of the Arkansas Trichoptera. J. Georgia Entomol. Soc., 5:167-174.

Vasilyeva, L. N. & S. L. Stephenson. 2007. Cryptovalsaria gen. nov. and its two species from eastern Asia and south central North America. Sydowia, 59:154-160.

Waddell, D. R. 1982. A predatory slime mould. Nature, 298:464-166.

Walsh, G. W. & B. F. Coles. 2002. Distributions and geographical relationships of the polygyrid land snails (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Polygyridae) of Arkansas. J. Arkansas Acad. Sci., 56:212-219.

Weaver, J. S., III. 2002. A synonymy of the caddisfly genus Lepidostoma Rambur (Trichoptera: Lepidostomatidae), including a species checklist. Tijdschrift voor Entomol., 145:173-192.

Wolfe, G. W. 2000. Key to species of Heterosternuta of Canada and United States. Pp. 230-232, in Predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) of the Nearctic region, with emphasis on the fauna of Canada and Alaska (D. J. Larson, V. Alarie & R. E. Roughley, eds.). National Research Council of Canada Research Press, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 982 pp.

Wu, S.-K., R. D. Oesch & M. E. Gordon. 1997. Missouri Aquatic Snails. Nat. Hist. Series, No. 5. Missouri Dept. Conservation: Jefferson, Missouri, 97 pp.

Zeppelini, D., S. J. Taylor & M. E. Slay. 2009. Cave Pygmarrhopalites Vargovitsh, 2009 (Collembola, Symphypleona, Arrhopalatidae) in United States. Zootaxa, 2204:1-8.

Chris T. McAllister, Henry W. Robison and Michael E. Slay

RapidWrite, 102 Brown Street, Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas 71913 Department of Biology, Southern Arkansas University Magnolia, Arkansas 71754 and The Nature Conservancy, 601 North University Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72205

CTM at: drctmcallister@aol.com
COPYRIGHT 2009 Texas Academy of Science
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2009 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Author:McAllister, Chris T.; Robison, Henry W.; Slay, Michael E.
Publication:The Texas Journal of Science
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:1U7AR
Date:Aug 1, 2009
Words:4267
Previous Article:Karyotype diversity among and within avian taxa: a simple test in R.
Next Article:Selection of available post-fire substrate by the ground skink, Scincella lateralis (squamata: scincidae).
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2020 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters