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Television and movie agreement.

The Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTP. A), who together have 110,000 members, signed a 3-year collective bargaining agreement recently with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers. The agreement brings "principal performers" feature actors--and extras under the same contract for the first time. The Alliance represented approximately 300 major producers of film and television programs.

The pact calls for annual wage increases of 4 percent, raising the minimum daily pay scale for principal performers to $504 over the term of the contract and the weekly scale to $1,752; a daily rate of $65 for general extra performers, $75 for speciality ability extra performers, and $90 for stand-ins (the AFTRA Network Code rate applies to AFTRA members); an increase in daily meal allowances; and elimination of the 10-percent night work premium, except for certain work during post-production.

The contract also sets a guarantee of six episodes of work for television series, with minimum salaries per episode of $2,160 on July 1, 1992, for half-hour seties, advancing to $2,336 over the term of the contract, and $2,539 for 1-hour series, advancing to $2,747 over the term; higher "money breaks" for the employment schedules; and an expansion in the television rerun residual formula to include reruns after July 1, 1992, of l-hour network primetime dramatic programs on late night network, 1-hour dramatic programs made for late night broadcasts that are rerun in syndication, and 1-hour dramatic programs made for Fox Broadcasting that are rerun in syndication or on late night network.

Other terms include use of Screen Actors Guild members for the first 15 extras used per day in theatrical and television productions and the first 30 extras used in film productions; the strengthening of SAG'S nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provision; and extension of the SAG provision for "an act of God" and illness to AFTRA primetime dramatic programs.

Television and movie extras had been represented by the Screen Extras Guild, Inc., which disbanded June 1 and transferred its jurisdiction to the Screen Guild. This represented a return to the fold for the extras, who broke away from the Screen Guild and established their own organization in 1946 on the West Coast.
COPYRIGHT 1992 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
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Title Annotation:collective bargaining agreement; Screen Actors Guild, American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers
Publication:Monthly Labor Review
Date:Aug 1, 1992
Words:375
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