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Take the Pledge.

Byline: THEM US & with MARC WADDINGTON

THERE have been some brilliant political slogans over the years, statements and rhetoric that really encapsulate the message someone is trying to get over, instantly memorable and embedded in history forever more.

"Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country" from John F Kennedy (actually his speech writer Ted Sorensen), "never ... has so much been owed by so many to so few" from Winston Churchill after the Battle of Britain, and even Margaret Thatcher's "The lady's not for turning" or Tony Blair's "education, education, education" will be remembered for years to come.

This General Election campaign is sadly lacking any real, powerful slogans. Whether it's Labour, the Tories, the Lib Dems or UKIP, there seems to be no statement that really sticks out, no line that is instantly quotable or brands the parties' individual campaigns. It's like they've adopted William Burrough's cutup technique of writing and just thrown the words 'change', 'future', 'better', 'hardworking' and 'believe' up in the air and adopted whatever statement they landed in the form of.

No-one has come close to Barack Obama's "Yes we can", (except Bob the Builder), Bill Clinton's "It's the economy, stupid" or George Bush Snr's "Read my lips, no new taxes".

The average can of aerosol under the sink is likely to have a better slogan on it than most of the parties' manifestos this year. During a conversation along these lines the other day, a colleague of mine sent me a picture of a can of Pledge on which the slogan was "Revitalise and Protect". Cameron, Clegg or Miliband would have been better adopting that to talk about the economy.

other day, a colleague of mine sent me a picture of a can of Pledge on which the slogan was "Revitalise and Protect". Cameron, Clegg or Miliband would have been better adopting that to talk about the economy.

With this in mind, I thought about some of the other great ad slogans over time, and whether they'd do the business in the world of politics 1. Save Money, Live Better: definitely one for the Tories, this, with their puritanical obsession with thrift. And not a million miles away from Cameron's recent, wistful pledge to return us all to a Tom and Barbara-style the other great ad slogans over time, and whether they'd do the business in the world of politics 1. Save Money, Live Better: the Tories, this, with their puritanical obsession with thrift. And not a million miles away from Cameron's recent, wistful pledge to return us all to a Tom and Barbara-style Good Life. But Cameron missed this one, as it's unlikely he shops in Asda, whose parent company Walmart came up with this one. 2. The Greatest Tragedy Is Indifference: while this election will probably have an extremely high turn out, most forms of election suffer from pretty poor shows. All the parties will tell you the importance of voting, but has anyone said it as well as the Red Cross? polish a more a more than any than any parties' parties' 3. Growing And Protecting Your Wealth: it's what they're all trying to tell us they want to be able to do, save the use of the word wealth, which is somehow seen as dirty. But Prudential seemed to encapsulate the message better than any politician has. 4. Taking Care Of Business: again, they all want to be seen as the business friendly party, even if there is a distinction between good capitalism and bad capitalism, as Labour have suggested. But why couldn't any of them think of this simple phrase? It's got all the ambiguity a good political slogan needs, but it seems the paper-clip sellers at Office Depot had the edge here.

5. The Home Of The Whopper: well, Burger King might have said it first, but this is one every party should probably adopt right now.

'The can of furniture polish under my sink has a more powerful slogan than any of the political parties'

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Publication:Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England)
Date:Apr 16, 2015
Words:690
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