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TOP FIVE ELECTRONICS MANUFACTURING STATES SHOW DECLINES IN EMPLOYMENT LEVELS

 TOP FIVE ELECTRONICS MANUFACTURING STATES
 SHOW DECLINES IN EMPLOYMENT LEVELS
 TWINSBURG, Ohio, April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- The full impact of the recession has exacted its toll on the electronics manufacturing sector, according to statistics taken from the just published "Harris 1992 U.S. Electronics Industry Directory." "Our data indicates the five states with the most electronics manufacturers had significant declines in employment over the last two years," said Robert A. Harris, president of Harris Publishing Company of Twinsburg, Ohio.
 As the leading complier/publisher of electronics industry directories and directories on diskette, the Harris research staff contacts more than 12,000 electronics industry manufacturers on an annual basis. "Our information is detailed and comprehensive," stated Harris. "These statistics represent the components, instruments and controls, power supplies, test equipment, computers and peripherals markets. Among the top five electronics manufacturing states, Illinois had the smallest decline in employment levels, from 240,747 in 1989 down to 232,127 in 1991, a 3.6 percent drop. California had the second lowest decline, from 759,218 in 1989 to 711,541 in 1991, a 6.3 percent decrease."
 The Harris statistics show Pennsylvania's 14.4 percent electronics manufacturing employment decline to be the largest, dropping from 182,133 in 1989 to 155,959 in 1991. New York followed with a drop from 199,392 to 171,965, a 13.8 percent difference. The Massachusetts economy continues to be hit hard with a 9.7 percent decline from 256,146 in 1989 to 231,241 in 1991. Machusetts moved from the second largest state for electronics employment to third place behind Illinois.
 Pete Walsh, vice president of the Electronics Industries Association, agreed with the Harris findings. "My view of the employment declines in the top five states," he commented, "insofar as components manufacturing, is due to the recessed economy and company belt-tightening. Also that includes automated assembly processing because of the ever-growing trend to miniaturization and surface mount technology, and the penetration of imports."
 Edward Henderson of Henderson Ventures, a marketing research firm in Los Altos, Calif. offered his view of the reduction. "The decline in employment is a direct result of the repressed conditions in the U.S. electronics equipment industry," he said. "Equipment output grew by only 3.7 percent in 1990, barely keeping up with inflation. During 1991 revenues inched up by only 1.1 percent. Declining defense budgets undercut the demand for military electronic and the recession kicked the pins out from under computer and industrial electronics markets. Because Massachusetts is a center for military electronics and the ill-fated minicomputer; employment has suffered accordingly." Henderson does see some light at the end of the tunnel, however. The firm's newsletter publication, the "Henderson Electronic Market Forecast," calls for output to increase by 2.8 percent this year and a more robust 7.1 percent in 1993.
 "The declining electronics industry employment trend indicated by our statistics appears to be slowing," Harris noted. "We are seeing signs that the industry's economy is on the upswing. Our field sales force which calls on industry manufacturers and distributors daily from coast-to-coast, is reporting a more optimistic mood than a year ago, even in the hard-hit New England market."
 For more information on Harris directories call toll-free 800-888-5900.
 -0- 4/22/92
 /CONTACT: Barbara Brouse of Harris Publishing Company, 216-425-9000 or toll-free 800-888-5900/ CO: Harris Publishing Company ST: Ohio IN: SU:


CG -- CLFNS2 -- 2898 04/27/92 07:34 EDT
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Date:Apr 27, 1992
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