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THE DECADE OF THE DOCUMENT

 THE DECADE OF THE DOCUMENT
 MOUNT LAUREL, N.J., Sept. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- The following is from a


white paper issued by Okidata. This paper is the third in a series of three.
 It's hardly surprising that the 1990s have been heralded as the "Decade of the Document" by industry thinkers and futurists. Behind this moniker is the growing realization that knowledge or information is an organization's most vital asset, and its most overlooked, underutilized, and often abused resource. The importance of information to competitiveness, efficiency, innovation and success is so critical that BYTE magazine's June 1992 issue recently devoted an unprecedented 43 pages to a multi-article cover story headlined "Making Knowledge Pay." In a prescient editorial, Editor-in-Chief Dennis Allen wrote: "You can't afford not to read this issue of BYTE, because inside is article after article on one of the biggest stories of the decade."
 Why all this sudden ballyhoo and banter about documents? Because as organizations begin to identify information, or knowledge, inside and outside their operation as a vital strategic asset, documents -- the most common repository of this information -- are increasingly taking the spotlight. John Warnock, chairman and CEO of Adobe Systems, in one of the BYTE articles, describes documents as "abstractions of information that have been refined in many ways to communicate ideas."
 In fact, a document no longer is defined by a hard copy report or memo containing textual information. Today live compound documents contain a mixture of data types -- from text and graphics to images, voice annotations, and even video. The distinction between hard and soft copy is beginning to blur as people rely on e-mail, LANs and faxing to electronically share documents. In fact, rather than being the only document storage and communication medium, paper is now just one of a number of document distribution mediums available.
 When someone says, "I sent you a document," or "I'll go get that document," we no longer immediately turn to the mail box or look toward the filing cabinet. In fact, as electronic communications and "virtual" documents evolve, many foresee the time when filing cabinets, the postal service, even the telephone as we know it, will become obsolete or will be rendered virtually useless. Information exchange will take on many new dimensions. Additional topics discussed in this white paper include:
 -- Electronic tools enable rapid information exchange
 -- The unrealized promise
 -- The document processing revolution
 -0- 9/9/92
 NOTE TO EDITORS: For the complete text of this white paper, please contact Rachael Munoz at 415-354-4453, or Margaret Moore at 415-354-4482.
 /CONTACT: Rachael Munoz, 415-354-4453, or Margaret Moore, 415-354-4482, both of Regis McKenna for Okidata/ CO: Okidata ST: New Jersey IN: CPR SU:


RM -- SJFNS3X -- 7796 09/10/92 07:32 EDT
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Date:Sep 10, 1992
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