Printer Friendly

THE CLEANEST BURNING WOOD STOVE EVER MADE ALL BUT ELIMINATES POLLUTION CAUSING EMISSIONS

 BETHEL, Vt., Aug. 10 /PRNewswire/ -- In Vermont, they're turning wood into warmth without the smoke.
 Twenty years ago the wood burning stove achieved a decade of popularity as a heat-producing alternative to inefficient fireplaces and costly gas and oil. But along with the heat came an unwanted by- product: air pollution. Based on EPA testing standards, emission rates of up to 40 grams of pollutants an hour were common in the old stoves. New federal standards that sharply limited so-called particulate emissions just about snuffed out the wood burning fire.
 Today, stove makers such as Dennis Dillon, president of Vermont Castings in Bethel, Vt., have reinvented the beloved cast-iron wood- burning stove. Now it is a low-polluting, high-heat-producing and environmentally sound solution to the homeowner's need for heat. A device called a catalytic combustor, something like those on cars, is the basis for the revolution. It burns the particles that produce smoke. A clean-burning stove that is highly efficient is the result. The current EPA standard for catalytic stoves is 4.1 grams per hour. Dillon's company is producing a stove rated at 1.1 grams per hour. That stove, the Dutchwest, is the cleanest-burning wood stove ever made.
 "The cast-iron wood burning stoves we make here today are nothing like the old stoves when it comes to performance," says Dillon. "The nostalgic charm is still there because of the cast-iron construction, but inside the stove there is a technological revolution going on."
 Dillon's company also makes a stove that burns energy-packed and environmentally sound pellet fuel. The pellets, about the size of a pencil eraser, are made from waste materials such as sawdust and cardboard.
 The added dividend: "It saves landfill space and burning pellets conserves dwindling fossil fuel supplies," Dillon says.
 To show the environmental benefits of pellet fuel technology, the Sierra Club recently installed a Vermont Castings Reliance pellet stove in its LeConte Memorial Lodge in Yosemite National Park.
 Recycling is also part of today's stove industry. The cast iron for Vermont Castings stoves is mixture of virgin ore and recycled iron. Using recycled iron conserves energy and resources. A cast-iron, disc brake rotor from an auto repair shop in Springfield, Mass., may become part of a stove in a Boston townhouse.
 "People have always loved the look of a fire on the hearth, but now they are also concerned about the environment," Dillon said. "We're proving that the two can go hand-in-hand."
 A free copy Vermont Castings' Fireside Advisor magazine is available by calling 800-227-8683. A Fireside Advisor video tape is also available for $9.95.
 -0- 8/10/93
 /EDITORS' NOTE: Dillon is available for interviews. Photos and B- roll video tape are also available./
 /CONTACT: Gary Hughes of Wolkcas Advertising, Inc., 518-869-4846, for Vermont Castings, Inc., or Julie Smith of Vermont Castings, Inc., 802-234-2300/ CO: Vermont Castings, Inc. ST: Vermont IN: HOU ENV SU: PDT


LV -- NYEFNS7 -- 0986 08/10/93 06:52 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Aug 10, 1993
Words:490
Previous Article:REHABCLINICS, INC. REVENUES INCREASE 64 PERCENT
Next Article:COMFORT HOUSE: NEW PRODUCTS MAKE LIFE EASIER FOR SENIORS
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters