Printer Friendly

TEXTILE INDUSTRY USES QUICK RESPONSE AS COMPETITIVE EDGE

 TEXTILE INDUSTRY USES QUICK RESPONSE AS COMPETITIVE EDGE
 HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C., June 11 /PRNewswire/ -- U.S. textile companies are using a "Quick Response" partnership concept of manufacturing and merchandising to react to consumer needs and combat foreign competition, an industry leader said today.
 Speaking at the annual meeting of the Southern Textile Association here, Henry A. Truslow III, first vice president of the American Textile Manufacturers Institute (ATMI), emphasized the importance of the Quick Response system, which relies on partnerships in the fiber-textile- apparel-retail chain to exchange market and production information electronically.
 U.S. companies use the system to enhance "quality, reliability and predictability," Truslow said, dramatically reducing inventory, costs and the time needed to satisfy consumer demand at retail.
 "I predict that the companies that employ Quick Response are the companies who will be around to prosper in the next century," said Truslow, also chairman and chief executive officer of Sunbury Textile Mills, Inc., in Sunbury, Pa.
 He also told the professional association of manufacturing executives that they play a key role in preserving the environment. ATMI has launched an "Encouraging Environmental Excellence" program, a 10-point plan for textile companies to demonstrate their commitment to environmental preservation efforts.
 Participating companies submit environmental policy statements, conduct audits of their equipment and facilities, and address employee education, community outreach and recycling needs. A logo has been developed and is being registered for use by qualifying textile companies and their customers.
 Several major apparel companies and retailers have expressed interest in ATMI's environmental excellence program, Truslow said.
 Truslow also addressed international trade and human resource developments affecting the industry, including:
 A) The Uruguay Round trade negotiations, which includes a textile proposal that would benefit industries in the Far East at the expense of those in the United States, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Africa. "We are asking our negotiators to extend to 15 years from 10 the proposed phaseout period of the Multifiber Arrangement, which regulates textile and apparel trade," Truslow said. "At the same time, we want access to those markets that are denied us under the current trading scheme."
 B) The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) involving the United States, Canada and Mexico. The U.S. textile industry supports a provision requiring all textile and apparel products affected by the agreement to be made in North America -- from yarn to cutting and sewing. "We believe NAFTA can be a plus for our industry," Truslow said.
 C) Rising health care costs. "One of the more promising approaches to controlling costs is managed health care, which tracks the quality, cost and delivery of health care services," he said.
 D) Education. "We as an industry and as individual companies need to continue and expand our strong support for education," Truslow said. "This is the key to improving our competitiveness and at the same time addressing a serious national problem." Most textile companies provide programs to upgrade the skills of employees and participate in partnerships with elementary, secondary and high schools.
 -0- 6/11/92
 /CONTACT: Jim Morrissey, 803-785-1234, or Deborah E. Anderson, 202-862-0513 (office) or 703-476-6436 (after hours), both of the American Textile Manufacturers Institute/ CO: American Textile Manufacturers Institute ST: IN: TEX SU:


EA-BR -- AT008 -- 9220 06/11/92 12:08 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jun 11, 1992
Words:543
Previous Article:NELSON AND ANGELILLO PROMOTED AT SOUTHERN PROGRESS
Next Article:SPRINT ESTIMATES SECURITY PROGRAMS REDUCE PBX FRAUD BY 90 PERCENT
Topics:


Related Articles
IMPROVED BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN U.S. TEXTILE INDUSTRY TEMPERED BY TRADE DEVELOPMENTS
U.S. TEXTILE INDUSTRY CALLS FOR 'DRAMATIC' GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO CONTINUING IMPORT SURGE
U.S. TEXTILE MILLS CREATE NEW PRODUCTS THAT STRESS QUALITY, PERFORMANCE FOR CONSUMERS
U.S. TEXTILE INDUSTRY FINDS NEW APPROACHES TO MANAGING CHANGE IN BUSINESS CONDITIONS, POLITICAL CLIMATE
DUFF & PHELPS ASSIGNS 'BB' RATING TO P.T. POLYSINDO EKA PERKASA
U.S. TEXTILE INDUSTRY FACES CHALLENGES OF SERVING CUSTOMERS WORLDWIDE
Multifactor productivity: cotton and synthetic broadwoven fabrics.
ELISHA SAYS NAFTA HAS SPURRED EXPORTS OF U.S. TEXTILES, GROWTH OF TEXTILE INDUSTRY
Textile imports ease up: Canada, Mexico shipments grow.
Govt must take concrete relief measures in budget 2009-10: ICCI.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters