Printer Friendly

TECHNOLOGY & ARTISTRY BRING GROWTH TO MONUMENT INDUSTRY

 EVANSTON, ILL., Oct. 20 /PRNewswire/ -- The monument industry, known for its skilled artisans, has experienced technological growth in recent years due to manufacturing capabilities and computer advancements which are revolutionizing the way monuments are produced.
 "The introduction of modern machinery, combined with the artistic skills of the craftsman, has opened the door for monument manufacturers and retailers to expand creativity at affordable prices," says Ed Simmons, executive vice president of the Monument Builders of North America (MBNA). "Today's machinery is capable of producing shapes and finishes at a more reasonable price than the labor-intensive methods of the past, resulting in greater variety, efficiency and quality control."
 Most of the technological advances employed by the monument industry in recent years have involved some type of automation, according to Tom Robinson, executive vice president of the Elberton Granite Association in Elberton, Ga. "Computerization has been the key to growth for many monument manufacturers and retailers," Robinson says. "Computers are now being used in almost every phase of monument production, from quarry extraction to graphic design."
 Computer-operated machinery is used in the monument industry to extract, cut, shape and polish stone as well as to create and engrave graphic designs and various lettering styles.
 One of the newest and most revolutionary pieces of equipment to be used in monument manufacturing combines the use of industrial diamonds, computer automation and computerized graphic design. The contour diamond wiresaw, which was developed within the last year, shapes monuments by following a drawing on a computer screen. Essentially, the designer draws a digitized image of the desired monument shape on the computer screen. The computer then instructs the diamond wiresaw to cut the shape from the stone.
 Computerization has not only impacted monument manufacturers, but has also led to improvements for monument designers and retailers. With today's computer graphics programs, memorial designs can be created on a computer screen, saving time and producing more realistic images. This technique is especially helpful for monument retailers, who can now provide customers with a computer printout of a monument design to help them visualize the finished product.
 "While the introduction of high-tech machinery and computerized cutting equipment presents many advantages, it in no way replaces the need for the artisan," Robinson emphasizes.
 Many techniques used to personalize a monument -- including carving of ornamentation and symbols, sculpting and free-form etching -- require the talents of a skilled craftsman and must be performed by hand.
 "The monument industry has definitely gone through a period of transition during the last several years," says Simmons. "By taking advantage of new technologies available in the industry today, monument builders have been able to grow their businesses while preparing for the developments of tomorrow."
 -0- 10/20/93
 /CONTACT: Cheryl Ehrle of Tassani Communications, 312-645-8272/


CO: Monument Builders of North America ST: Illinois IN: SU:

GK-TM -- NYFNS2 -- 4332 10/20/93 07:36 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 20, 1993
Words:477
Previous Article:1993 REMODELING AMERICA TOUR STOPS IN CLEVELAND
Next Article:SHOULD THE AXE FALL -- MORE THAN A THIRD OF EXECUTIVES HAVE RESUMES READY; SURVEY REFLECTS JOB INSECURITY IN THE 90s
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters