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Sweater or tunic, this Lapland-style pullover is easy to sew.

Sweater or tunic, this Lapland-style pullover is easy to sew Sewing a sweater may sound contradictory, but that's what you do to make these cold-weather pullovers. Inspired by traditional Laplander costume, the tunics start with broad pieces of wool or polyester fleece, which you cut and sew together, then embroider.

We've developed a pattern (page 152) which you can adjust to fit men, women, or children. To scale it up or down, simply change the size of the grid.

Selecting your materials

Refer to the chart on page 152 to find the approximate amount of material your sweater will require.

Next, select a 60-inch-wide fabric, choosing between an inexpensive polyester fleece (about $8 per yard) or the fine wool used for coats (prices start at $20 per yard). You may prefer to use the fleece for children's sweaters because it costs less and is machine-washable.

You'll also nee #3 pearl cotton embroidery thread (available at needlepoint or crafts supply stores), an embroidery needle, and tailor's tracking paper or brown paper for the patter. If you plan to use wool, you may want to buy an equal amount of muslin to test the pattern.

Preparing the pattern

Before beginning, check measurements of wearer's arms, chest, hips, and torso length. Follow the chart and pattern to find appropriate grid size. For thick-waisted people, add 1 or 2 inches to width of midsection along line DED.

The adjust for sleeve length. Have the would-be wearer extend arms outward, then measure the distance from palm to palm. If the length exceeds the width of the fabric, you'll have to add cuffs.

The other variable is the neck. Since the fabric won't stretch, you have to make the opening large enough to slip loosely over the wearer's head. Before cutting pattern at B, cut out collar pieces. Test-fit the joined pieces to assure clearance. Then adjust tunic neckline to fit collar.

Sewing it all together

After completing the paper pattern, fold the fabric in half (to measure 30 inches wide) and cut out the sweater's separate parts. Zigzag stitch all raw edges. If necessary, extend sleeves by adding cuffs; follow step 1 on page 150.

Starting with upper body parts, overlap the arms along AB by 3/4 inch (see step 2), then pin, baste, and machine-stitch 1/2 inch in from edge. Trim off excess fabric on inside.

In the same manner, join midsection parts along DED to both upper-body halves. Place the front and back halves of tunic wrong sides together. Pin, then baste 1/4 inch in from edge along CDF; machine-stitch.

With right sides together, join both collar halves with 1/2-inch seams. Place a damp cloth over the seams and iron flat. With wrong side of tunic against right side of collar, baste around neckline, allowing a 1/4-inch seam; machine-stitch.

Complete by adding a decorative 1/2-inch-wide blanket-stitch along sleeve top, mid-section seams, bottom edge, and cuff ends and seams. Fold collar over, baste, then blanket-stitch along edge so edge joins the neckline seam.
COPYRIGHT 1988 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1988 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Sunset
Date:Mar 1, 1988
Words:505
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