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Sumatran tiger reportedly kills woman in Indonesia.

JAKARTA, Dec. 28 Kyodo

A critically endangered Sumatran tiger killed a village woman in Indonesia's West Sumatra Province on Wednesday, the Jakarta-based Media Indonesia reported Thursday

The woman, identified only as Sirai, was killed by the tiger Wednesday night when she went of her house to an outside toilet, the newspaper said.

The woman's 12-year-old daughter, who witnessed the attack, said the tiger dragged her 47-year-old mother into the forest.

Villagers were able to recover only the woman's head after a later search.

Dharmasraya regency police Chief Arum Priono said the tiger apparently attacked the villager because the animal's natural habitant is being destroyed.

Sumatran tigers have suffered severely from poaching and a rapid decline in forest area due to conversion into other uses such as oil palm groves and plantations of fast-growing Acacia trees for the pulp and paper industry.

According to the World Wildlife Fund, during the period of 1998-2002 at least 116 tigers were killed in the central and southern parts of Sumatra.

In Sumatra's Riau Province alone, the WWF discovered that 61 tigers had been killed between 1998 and 2004.

The Sumatran tiger is only found on Sumatra Island and it is estimated there are no more than 500 left in the wild.

The species, listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, is the only tiger subspecies left in Indonesia.

Its relatives the Balinese and Javan tigers have become extinct -- the last observations of those subspecies in the wild were in the 1970s.
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Publication:Asian Political News
Geographic Code:9INDO
Date:Jan 1, 2007
Words:255
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