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Such Gup.

Madman and child

European classical art has many beautiful representations of Madonna and Child. Our desi version, say Karachi's wags, is the Quaid-e-Qiwam and his teenage daughter, aka Madman and Child. This young girl, no more than fifteen years of age, is mature beyond her years and has been afflicted with the burden of looking after her dysfunctional parent. We hear she lives with her dad in London, regulates his visitors and decides who will meet him and for how long. The Quaid's only child, she is the offspring of his short-lived marriage which ended in an acrimonious divorce. We hear the Quaid has had a long-standing fondness for Rooh Afza and his divorce was due in part to his perpetually high spirits, but this problem was aggravated by the parting of ways with his wife. First, they say, he sank into a depression, followed by ever-greater dependence on nectar to fill the void in his life.

Rifts within

Some rifts are out in the open - as in the top echelons of The Great Khan's horde. Others are simmering beneath the surface - as in the ruling families of both Punjab and Sindh. While The Brothers Sharifov have papered over the cracks and displayed a united front, The Khan has been unable to pacify rivals whose conflicts have erupted violently for all to see. Similarly in the late, lamented Big Ben's party, while there is resentment at Addi's larger than life role, there is sullen acceptance in deference to the legacy of martyrs. And the problem is precisely this in The Khan's camp - there is no real acceptance of his leadership, and therefore no deference. The Khan's top echelons mates all believe they owe their electoral success to no one other than themselves. They also believe that they are all far more capable leaders than The Khan himself, and that should the need arise, the party will be theirs by right. While Big Ben's Hubby and The Man of Steel can get their comrades to swallow bitter pills, The Khan just can't. A case in point is the stubborn refusal of the Glaswegian, former Laat Sahab, to stay put in Pakistan and not fly off to the United Kingdom. Apparently, The Khan urged him not to leave on the heels of his public row with SMQ, but the Glaswegian insisted that he was needed for urgent work back in Blighty and left without a backward glance.

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KARACHI: Madman and child

European classical art has many beautiful representations of Madonna and Child. Our desi version, say Karachi's wags, is the Quaid-e-Qiwam and his teenage daughter, aka Madman and Child. This young girl, no more than fifteen years of age, is mature beyond her years and has been afflicted with the burden of looking after her dysfunctional parent. We hear she lives with her dad in London, regulates his visitors and decides who will meet him and for how long. The Quaid's only child, she is the offspring of his short-lived marriage which ended in an acrimonious divorce. We hear the Quaid has had a long-standing fondness for Rooh Afza and his divorce was due in part to his perpetually high spirits, but this problem was aggravated by the parting of ways with his wife. First, they say, he sank into a depression, followed by ever-greater dependence on nectar to fill the void in his life.

Rifts within

Some rifts are out in the open - as in the top echelons of The Great Khan's horde. Others are simmering beneath the surface - as in the ruling families of both Punjab and Sindh. While The Brothers Sharifov have papered over the cracks and displayed a united front, The Khan has been unable to pacify rivals whose conflicts have erupted violently for all to see. Similarly in the late, lamented Big Ben's party, while there is resentment at Addi's larger than life role, there is sullen acceptance in deference to the legacy of martyrs. And the problem is precisely this in The Khan's camp - there is no real acceptance of his leadership, and therefore no deference. The Khan's top echelons mates all believe they owe their electoral success to no one other than themselves. They also believe that they are all far more capable leaders than The Khan himself, and that should the need arise, the party will be theirs by right. While Big Ben's Hubby and The Man of Steel can get their comrades to swallow bitter pills, The Khan just can't. A case in point is the stubborn refusal of the Glaswegian, former Laat Sahab, to stay put in Pakistan and not fly off to the United Kingdom. Apparently, The Khan urged him not to leave on the heels of his public row with SMQ, but the Glaswegian insisted that he was needed for urgent work back in Blighty and left without a backward glance.
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Publication:Friday Times of Pakistan (Lahore, Pakistan)
Geographic Code:9PAKI
Date:May 6, 2016
Words:823
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