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Student Satisfaction and Academic Advising. AIR 1999 Annual Forum Paper.

ERIC Descriptors: Faculty Advisers; Higher Education; Teacher Student Relationship

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This study compared student satisfaction with various academic advising arrangements and determined the underlying considerations that affected their satisfaction. Students in 21 classes at a large public university completed a survey asking who their current academic advisor was and how well the current advising system met their needs. Students who were advised by advising center staff reported the highest degree of satisfaction with students advised by faculty reporting somewhat lesser satisfaction. Students preferred advising centers because of their more proactive approach and faculty because of the personal relationships formed. Students advised by peer counselors were the least satisfied because peers were not proactive, were often not available, and were usually not known to the advisee. Students tended to evaluate their advisors on six fairly separate dimensions, specifically the degree to which they were: (1) encouraging during meetings; (2) proactive in arranging meetings and defining responsibilities and obstacles to reaching student goals; (3) respectful of student opinions; (4) approachable; (5) personally knowledgeable about and interested in the advisee; and (6) good time managers who were on time for appointments, unhurried during the appointment, and available when needed. (DB)

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Author:Belcheir, Marcia J.
Publication:ERIC: Reports
Date:Jun 1, 1999
Words:267
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