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Stress reduces effectiveness of prostate cancer therapies.

ISLAMABAD -- Findings from a new study have suggested that beta-blockers, which are used for the treatment of high blood pressure and block the effects of stress hormone adrenaline, could increase the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies.

Prostate cancer patients have increased levels of stress and anxiety; however, several recent studies have found that men who take drugs that interfere with the stress hormone adrenaline have a lower incidence of prostate cancer.

George Kulik and colleagues at Wake Forest University examined the relationship between stress and cancer progression in a mouse model of prostate cancer.

Kulik and colleagues found that mice that had been subjected to stress (exposed to the scent of a predator) exhibited a significantly reduced response to a drug that induces cancer cell death compared to their unstressed counterparts. Administration of adrenaline also blocked cancer cell death. Conversely, drugs that inhibited adrenaline signalling ablated the effect of stress on prostate cancer.

The finding appeared in the latest issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
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Publication:The Frontier Star (Northwest Frontier Province, Pakistan)
Date:Jan 29, 2013
Words:165
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