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Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards No. 29--Heritage Assets and Stewardship Land.

The Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB or "the Board") was established by the Secretary of the Treasury, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and the Comptroller General in October 1990. It is responsible for promulgating accounting standards for the United States Government. These standards are recognized as generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) for the Federal Government.

SUMMARY

This standard changes the classification of information reported for heritage assets and stewardship land provided by Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards 8. This standard reclassifies all heritage assets and stewardship land information as basic except for condition information, which is reclassified as required supplementary information (PSI). This standard requires that entities reference a note on the balance sheet that discloses information about heritage assets and stewardship land, but no asset dollar amount should be shown. Instead, the note disclosure provides minimum reporting requirements consistent with the previous standards for heritage assets and stewardship land. These requirements include a description of major categories, physical unit information for the end of the reporting period, physical units added and withdrawn during the year, a description of the methods of acquisition and withdrawal, and condition information.

This standard also requires two new disclosures for heritage assets and stewardship land. Specifically, this standard requires additional reporting disclosures about entity stewardship policies and an explanation of how heritage assets and stewardship land relate to the mission of the entity.

This standard also includes the requirements for the U.S. Government-wide Financial Statement. It provides for a general discussion and directs users to the applicable entities' financial statements for more detailed information on heritage assets and stewardship land.

This standard amends several existing standards. The amendments rescind certain standards or parts of certain standards due to the classification change, as well as serve as a means to incorporate all standards specific to heritage assets and stewardship land into one document.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
Standards of Federal Financial Accounting
 Heritage Assets (including Multi-use Heritage
 Assets)
 Amendments to Existing Standards
 Definitions
 Recognition and Measurement
 Disclosures and Required Supplementary
 Information
 U.S. Government-wide Financial
 Statement Disclosures
 Stewardship Land
 Amendments to Existing Standards
 Definitions
 Recognition and Measurement
 Disclosures and Required Supplementary
 Information
 U.S. Government-wide Financial Statement
Disclosures
 Effective Date
Appendix A: Basis for Conclusions
 Introduction
 Amendments to Standards
 Basic vs. RSI
 U.S. Government-wide Financial Statement
 Exposure Draft
 Responses to the ED
 Board Consideration of Comments
 Importance to Mission
 Limiting Information Presented
 Categorization and Unitization
 Supporting Documentation
 Additional Guidance
 Effective Date/Phased-In Implementation
 Materiality
 Board Approval
Appendix B: List of Abbreviations


INTRODUCTION

1. The required supplementary stewardship information (RSSI) category, as described in Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) 8, was a response to the unique aspects of the Federal accounting and reporting environment, and to the broad objectives of Federal financial reporting. It was intended to permit flexibility on the part of preparers and auditors that would facilitate reporting relevant, reliable information, including nonfinancial and nonhistorical information. (1)

2. Although some stewardship information may not link directly with the basic financial statements because the data to be reported may be other than in dollar terms, the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (the Board or FASAB) intended that RSSI information would augment the basic financial statements and would receive commensurate audit scrutiny.

3. The Board found, however, that in many cases the word "supplementary" in the RSSI title caused certain readers to assume that the information was of secondary importance. Since this was contrary to its intentions, the Board decided to eliminate the RSSI category and recategorize the stewardship elements within the reporting categories that are well defined in existing professional literature and familiar to report users. Additionally, this standard clarifies the Board's expectation that information essential to fair presentation will be subject to audit.

4. The main focus of this standard is the reclassification of heritage assets and stewardship land information. This standard reclassifies heritage assets and stewardship land information as basic information with the exception of condition reporting, which is considered RSI (2). Specifically, this standard requires that entities reference a note on the balance sheet that discloses information about heritage assets and stewardship land, but no asset dollar amount should be shown. The note disclosure provides minimum reporting requirements consistent with the previous standards for heritage assets and stewardship land, which includes a description of major categories, physical unit information for the end of the reporting period, physical units added and withdrawn during the year, a description of the methods of acquisition and withdrawal, and condition information.

5. Although the most significant change within this standard is this reclassification, it also introduces certain changes to the disclosure requirements for heritage assets and stewardship land. Specifically, the standard requires additional reporting disclosures about entity stewardship policies and an explanation of how heritage assets and stewardship land relate to the mission of the entity.

6. This standard also includes disclosure requirements applicable to the U.S. Government-wide Financial Statement. This financial statement must provide a general discussion of heritage assets and stewardship land and direct users to the applicable entities' financial statements for more detailed information on these assets.

7. This standard also amends several existing standards. The amendments rescind certain standards or parts of certain standards due to the classification change, as well as serve as a means to incorporate all standards specific to heritage assets and stewardship land into one document.

8. The Board believes by fully incorporating into this standard all requirements for heritage assets (including multi-use heritage assets) and stewardship land, readers will better understand all reporting requirements. However, the main issues deliberated by the Board were the reclassification and presentation of heritage assets and stewardship land information. The Board has not reconsidered the definition, recognition and measurement provisions of the existing standards. These provisions have been brought forward from those standards that were based on prior Boards' conclusions.

9. The Board developed this standard for heritage assets and stewardship land based on the importance of the data in meeting the stewardship reporting objective as described in Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Concepts (SFFAC) 1, Objectives of Federal Financial Reporting. Further information on the Board's considerations regarding this reclassification is included in the Basis for Conclusions.

STANDARDS OF FEDERAL FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

Heritage Assets (including Multi-use Heritage Assets)

Amendments to Existing Standards

10. SFFAS 6 par. 21 is amended as follows: The following paragraphs provide recognition and measurement principles, and disclosure requirements for general PP&E. For standards relating to heritage assets multi-use heritage-assets and stewardship Land see SFFAS Heritage Assets and Stewardship Land. [begin strikethrough] each category of PP&E. The categories identified are: * general PP&E (including land acquired for or in connection with other general PP&E),

* National Defense PP&E,

* heritage assets, and

* stewardship land (i.e., land not included in general PP& E).[end strikethrough]

11. SFFAS 6 par. 57 through 65 are rescinded.

12. SFFAS 8 Chapter 2 (Heritage Assets) is rescinded in its entirety.

13. SFFAS 14 par. 10 and 11 are rescinded.

14. SFFAS 16 is rescinded in its entirety.

Definitions

15. Heritage assets are property, plant and equipment (PP&E) that are unique for one or more of the following reasons:

* historical or natural significance,

* cultural, educational, or artistic (e.g., aesthetic) importance; or

* significant architectural characteristics.

Heritage assets consist of (1) collection type heritage assets, such as objects gathered and maintained for exhibition, for example, museum collections, art collections, and library collections; and (2) non-collection-type heritage assets, such as parks, memorials, monuments, and buildings.

16. Heritage assets are generally expected to be preserved indefinitely. One example of evidence that a particular asset is heritage in nature is that it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

17. Some investments in heritage assets (e.g., national parks) will meet the definitions and be considered and reported as both heritage assets and stewardship land (see Stewardship Land below). Such reporting would not be considered duplication, as the type of information reported for the physical unit would be different for each category of stewardship asset.

18. Heritage assets may in some cases be used to serve two purposes--a heritage function and general government operations. In cases where a heritage asset serves two purposes, the heritage asset should be considered a multiuse heritage asset if the predominant use of the asset is in general government operations (e.g., the main Treasury building used as an office building). Heritage assets having an incidental use in government operations are not multi-use heritage assets; they are simply heritage assets.

Recognition and Measurement

Heritage Assets

19. With the exception of multi-use heritage assets (addressed in par. 22) the cost of acquisition, improvement, reconstruction, or renovation of heritage assets should be recognized on the statement of net cost for the period in which the cost is incurred. The cost (3) should include all costs incurred during the period to bring the item to its current condition (See par. 26 of SFFAS 6 for examples of the costs to be considered).

20. With the exception of multi-use heritage assets (addressed in par.23) no amounts for heritage assets acquired through donation or devise (4) should be recognized in the cost of heritage assets. (5)

21. With the exception of multi-use heritage assets (addressed in par. 24) transfers of heritage assets from one Federal entity to another do not affect the net cost of operations or net position of either entity. However, in some cases, assets included in general PP&E may be transferred to an entity for use as heritage assets. In this instance, the transferring entity should recognize a transfer-out of capitalized assets. (6)

Multi-use Heritage Assets

22. The cost of acquisition, improvement, reconstruction, or renovation of multi-use heritage assets should be capitalized as general PP&E and depreciated over its estimated useful fife.

23. Multi-use heritage assets acquired through donation or devise should be recognized as general PP&E at the assets' fair value at the time received, and the amount should also be recognized as "nonexchange revenues" as defined in SFFAS 7, Accounting for Revenue and Other Financing Sources.

24. Transfers of multi-use heritage assets from one Federal entity to another are transfers of capitalized assets. The receiving entity should recognize a transfer-in as an additional financing source and the transferring entity should recognize a transfer-out. The value recorded should be the transferring entity's book value of the multi-use heritage asset. If the receiving entity is not provided the book value, the multi-use heritage asset should be recorded at its estimated fair value. (7)

Disclosures and Required Supplementary Information

25. Entities with heritage assets should reference a note (8) on the balance sheet that discloses information about heritage assets, but no asset dollar amount should be shown. (9) The note disclosure related to heritage assets should provide the following:

a. A concise statement explaining how they relate to the mission of the entity.

b. A brief description of the entity's stewardship policies for heritage assets. Stewardship policies for heritage assets are the goals and principles the entity established to guide its acquisition, maintenance, use, and disposal of heritage assets consistent with statutory requirements, prohibitions, and limitations governing the entity and the heritage assets.

c. A concise description of each major category of heritage asset. The appropriate level of categorization of heritage assets should be meaningful and determined by the preparer based on the entity's mission, types of heritage assets, and how it manages the assets.

d. Heritage assets should be quantified in terms of physical units. The appropriate level of aggregation and physical units (10) of measure for each major category should be meaningful and determined by the preparer based on the entity's mission, types of heritage assets, and how it manages the assets. For each major category of heritage asset (identified in c. above) the following should be reported:

1. The number of physical units by major category; major categories should be classified by collection or non-collection type heritage assets for which the entity is the steward as of the end of the reporting period;

2. The number of physical units by major category that were acquired and the number of physical units by major category that were withdrawn during the reporting period; and

3. A description of the major methods of acquisition and withdrawal of heritage assets during the reporting period. This should include disclosure of the number of physical units (by major category) of transfers of heritage assets between Federal entities and the number of physical units (by major category) of heritage assets acquired through donation or devise, if material. In addition, the fair value of heritage assets acquired through donation or devise during the reporting period should be disclosed, if known and material.

26. Entities should report the condition (11) of the heritage assets (which may be reported with the deferred maintenance information (12) as required supplementary information. Entities should include a reference to the condition and deferred maintenance information (13) if reported elsewhere in the report containing the basic financial statements.

27. Entities should disclose that multi-use heritage assets are recognized and presented with general PP&E in the basic financial statements and that additional information for the multiuse heritage assets is included with the heritage assets information.

U.S. Government-wide Financial Statement Disclosures (14)

28. The U.S. Government-wide financial statement should reference a note on the balance sheet that discloses information about heritage assets, but no asset dollar amount should be shown. The note disclosure related to heritage assets should provide the following:

a. A concise statement explaining how they relate to the mission of the Federal Government.

b. A description of the broad categories of heritage assets of the Federal Government.

c. A general reference to agency reports for additional information about heritage assets, such as agency stewardship policies for heritage assets, physical units by major categories of heritage assets, and the condition of the heritage assets.

29. The U.S. Government-wide financial statement should disclose that multi-use heritage assets are recognized and presented with general PP&E in the basic financial statements and that additional information for the multi-use heritage assets is included with the heritage assets information.

Stewardship Land

Amendments to Existing Standards

30. SFFAS 6 par. 66 through 76 are rescinded.

31. SFFAS 8 Chapter 4 (Stewardship Land) is rescinded in its entirety.

32. SFFAS 14 par. 10 and 11 are rescinded.

Definitions

33. Stewardship Land is land and land rights (15) owned by the Federal Government but not acquired for or in connection with (16) items of general PP&E. Examples of stewardship land include land used as forests and parks, and land used for wildlife and grazing.

34. "Land" is defined as the solid part of the surface of the earth. Excluded from the definition are the natural resources (that is, depletable resources, such as mineral deposits and petroleum; renewable resources, such as timber; and the outer-continental shelf resources) related to land. (17)

35. Land and land rights owned by the Federal Government and acquired for or in connection with items of general PP&E should be accounted for and reported as general PP&E.

36. Land and land rights owned by the Federal Government and not acquired for or in connection with items of general PP&E should be reported as stewardship land.

Recognition and Measurement

37. The cost of acquisition of stewardship land should be recognized on the statement of net cost for the period in which the cost is incurred. The cost should include all costs to prepare stewardship land for its intended use (e.g., razing a building). In some cases, land may be acquired along with existing structures. The following treatments should apply:

a. if the structure would be deemed a heritage asset and is significant in and of itself, the entity should use its judgment as to whether the acquisition cost should be treated as the cost of stewardship land, heritage asset, or both;

b. if the structure is to be used in operations (for example, as general PP&E) but 1) the value of the structure is insignificant, or 2) its acquisition is merely a byproduct of the acquisition of the land, the cost in its entirety should be treated as an acquisition of stewardship land; or

c. significant structures that have an operating use (e.g., a constructed hotel or employee housing block) should be treated as general PP&E by identifying the cost attributable to general PP&E and segregating it from the cost of the stewardship land acquired.

38. No amounts for stewardship land acquired through donation or devise (18) should be recognized in the cost of stewardship land. (19)

39. Transfers of stewardship land from one Federal entity to another, does not affect the net cost of operations or net position of either entity. However, in some cases, land included in general PP&E may be transferred to an entity for use as stewardship land. In this instance, the transferring entity should recognize a transfer-out of capitalized assets. (20)

Disclosures and Required Supplementary Information

40. Entities with stewardship land should reference a note (21) on the balance sheet that discloses information about stewardship land, but no asset dollar amount should be shown. The note disclosure related to stewardship land should provide the following:

a. A concise statement explaining how it relates to the mission of the entity.

b. A brief description of the entity's stewardship policies for stewardship land. Stewardship policies for stewardship land are the goals and principles the entity established to guide its acquisition, maintenance, use, and disposal of stewardship land consistent with statutory requirements, prohibitions, and limitations governing the entity and the stewardship land.

c. A concise description of each major category of stewardship land use. Where parcels of land have more than one use, the predominant use of the land should be considered the major use. In cases where land has multiple uses, none of which is predominant, a description of the multiple uses should be presented. The appropriate level of categorization of stewardship land use should be meaningful and determined by the preparer based on the entity's mission, types of stewardship land use, and how it manages the assets.

d. Stewardship land should be quantified in terms of physical units. The appropriate level of aggregation and physical units of measure for each major category of stewardship land use should be meaningful and determined by the preparer based on the entity's mission, types of stewardship land use, and how it manages the assets. For each major category of stewardship land use the following should be reported:

1. The number of physical units by major category of stewardship land use for which the entity is the steward as of the end of the reporting period;

2. The number of physical units by major category of stewardship land use that were acquired and the number of physical units by major category of stewardship land use that were withdrawn during the reporting period; and

3. A description of the major methods of acquisition and withdrawal of stewardship land during the reporting period. This should include disclosure of physical units (by major category of stewardship land use) of transfers of stewardship land between Federal entities and the number of physical units (by major category of stewardship land use) of stewardship land acquired through donation or devise, if material. In addition, the fair value of stewardship land acquired through donation or devise during the reporting period should be disclosed, if known and material.

41. Entities should report the condition (22) of the stewardship land (which may be reported with the deferred maintenance information (23)) as required supplementary information. Entities should include a reference to the condition and deferred maintenance information (24) if reported elsewhere in the report containing the basic financial statements.

U.S. Government-wide Financial Statement Disclosures (25)

42. The U.S. Government-wide financial statement should reference a note on the balance sheet that discloses information about stewardship land, but no asset dollar amount should be shown. The note disclosure related to stewardship land should provide the following:

a. A concise statement explaining how it relates to the mission of the Federal Government.

b. A description of the predominant uses of the stewardship land of the Federal Government.

c. A general reference to agency reports for additional information about stewardship land, such as agency stewardship policies for stewardship land, physical units by major categories of stewardship land use, and the condition of the stewardship land.

EFFECTIVE DATE

43. These standards are effective for reporting periods beginning after September 30, 2005 with the exception of the specific paragraphs listed below. These exceptions provide for a phase-in of disclosure requirements being reported as basic information such that these standards will be fully implemented for reporting periods beginning after September 30, 2008.

a. Section c and section d1 in par. 25 and 40 are effective for reporting periods beginning after September 30, 2007;

b. Section d2 and section d3 in par. 25 and 40 are effective for reporting periods beginning after September 30, 2008; and

c. Information that is provided an exception (described in par. a. and b. above) to being reported as basic information during the phase-in period is still required, but should be reported as PSI until the exceptions expire.

44. Full implementation of the standards is effective for reporting periods beginning after September 30, 2008. Earlier implementation is encouraged.

FASAB Board Members

David Mosso, Chairman

Joseph V. Anania, Sr.

Philip T. Calder (through July 31, 2004)

Claire Gorham Cohen

Robert F. Dacey (from August 1, 2004)

John A. Farrell

Joseph L. Kull (through August 31, 2003)

James M. Patton

Robert N. Reid

Elizabeth Robinson

Alan H. Schumacher

David M. Zavada (from December 1, 2003)

The provisions of this Statement need not be applied to immaterial items.

(1) See the Implementation Guide to Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards 7: Accounting for Revenue and Other Financing Sources, par. 22-24, the diagram on page 15, and minutes of associated Board discussions. See also SFFAS 8, Supplementary Stewardship Reporting, par. 21, 34, 111-115, and minutes of associated Board discussions.

(2) RSI was added to the accounting literature by Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) 25, Suspension of Certain Accounting Requirements for Oil and Gas Producing Companies, published by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) in 1979. That Statement has been amended, but the KSI category continues to be used in a variety of standards published by the FASB, Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB), and FASAB. The auditor's responsibility for RSI is discussed in section AU 558 of the codification of professional auditing standards published by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).

(3) For a full discussion of cost, including full cost, direct cost and indirect cost, see SFFAS 4, Managerial Cost Accounting Concepts and Standards for the Federal Government. Also, see par 94-95, SFFAC 2 Entity and Display.

(4) A will or clause of a will disposing of property

(5) SFFAS 7, Accounting for Revenue and Other Financing Sources, par. 258-259 explains that stewardship PP&E is "expensed if purchased, but no amount is recognized if it is received as a donation."

(6) SFFAS 7, Accounting for Revenue and Other Financing Sources, par. 74 and par. 345-346.

(7) See SFFAS 7, Accounting for Revenue and Other Financing Sources, par. 74 for a discussion of transfers of assets.

(8) This standard does not prescribe a specific reference or line item entitled "Heritage Assets" as it may be included with other items for which no dollar amounts are recognized (such as stewardship land and other items that in the future may require similar non-financial disclosure) for presentation. Instead, the standard allows entities flexibility in determining the best presentation.

(9) No asset dollar amount is shown, except for multi-use heritage assets, which are capitalized and reported as part of general PP&E. See par. 22 through 24 and par. 27 for additional explanation.

(10) Defining physical units as individual items to be counted is neither required nor prohibited. Particularly for collection-type heritage assets, it may be more appropriate to define the physical unit as a collection, or a group of assets located at one facility, and then count the number of collections or facilities.

(11) Condition is the physical state of an asset. The condition of an asset is based on an evaluation of the physical status/state of an asset, its ability to perform as planned, and its continued usefulness. Evaluating an asset's condition requires knowledge of the asset, its performance capacity and its actual ability to perform, and expectations for its continued performance. The condition of a long-lived asset is affected by its durability, the quality of its design and construction, its use, the adequacy of maintenance that has been performed, and many other factors, including: accidents (an unforeseen and unplanned or unexpected event or circumstance), catastrophes (a tragic event), disasters (a sudden calamitous event bringing great damage, loss, or destruction), and obsolescence. Examples of condition information include, among others, (1) averages of standardized condition rating codes; (2) percentage of assets above, at, or below acceptable condition; or (3) narrative information.

(12) See SFFAS 6, Chapter 3, Deferred Maintenance (par. 77-84) for information regarding definition, measurement and disclosures specific to deferred maintenance.

(13) SFFAS 14, Amendments to Deferred Maintenance Reporting Amending SFFAS 6, Accounting for Property, Plant and Equipment and SFFAS 8, Supplementary Stewardship Reporting, defined deferred maintenance as KSI. The Board believed that a period of experimentation was necessary for deferred maintenance information and that classifying it as RSI would be more appropriate during the experimentation period. The Board may revise this standard based on experience gained during this time and the development of additional criteria.

(14) SFFAS 24, Selected Standards for the Consolidated Financial Report of the United States Government, clarified that all existing and future standards apply to all Federal entities, including the U.S. Government-wide Financial Statement, unless a standard specifically provides otherwise.

(15) Land rights are interests and privileges held by the entity in land owned by others, such as leaseholds, easements, water and water power rights, diversion rights, submersion rights, rights-of-way, mineral rights, and other like interests in land.

(16) "Acquired for or in connection with" is defined as including land acquired with the intent to construct general PP&E and land acquired in combination with general PP&E, including not only land used as the foundation, but also adjacent land considered to be the general PP&E's common grounds.

(17) The Board presently has an active project to address standards for natural resources, for which the Board is considering developing individual standards for each type of natural resource separately. To begin the project, the Board will be addressing oil and gas resources. The framework for the oil and gas resource phase of the project will be used as a model when addressing the other types or logical sets of natural resources (e.g., timber, grazing land, solid leasable minerals) in subsequent phases of the project.

(18) A will or clause of a will disposing of property.

(19) SFFAS 7, Accounting for Revenue and Other Financing Sources, par. 258-259 explains that stewardship PP&E is "expensed if purchased, but no amount is recognized if it is received as a donation."

(20) SFFAS 7, Accounting for Revenue and Other Financing Sources, par. 74 and par. 345-346.

(21) This standard does not prescribe a specific reference or line item entitled "Stewardship Land" as it may be included with other items for which no dollar amounts are recognized (such as heritage assets and other items that in the future may require similar non-financial disclosure) for presentation. Instead, the standard allows entities flexibility in determining the best presentation.

(22) Condition is the physical state of an asset. The condition of an asset is based on an evaluation of the physical status/state of an asset, its ability to perform as planned, and its continued usefulness. Evaluating an asset's condition requires knowledge of the asset, its performance capacity and its actual ability, to perform, and expectations for its continued performance. The condition of a long-lived asset is affected by its durability, the quality of its design and construction, its use. the adequacy of maintenance that has been performed, and many other factors, including: accidents (an unforeseen and unplanned or unexpected event or circumstance), catastrophes (a tragic event), disasters (a sudden calanfitous event bringing great damage, loss, or destruction), and obsolescence. Examples of condition information include, among others, (1) averages of standardized condition rating codes; (2) percentage of assets above, at, or below acceptable condition; or (3) narrative information.

(23) See SFFAS 6, Chapter 3, Deferred Maintenance (par. 77-84) for information regarding definition, measurement and disclosures specific to deferred maintenance.

(24) SFFAS 14, Amendments to Deferred Maintenance Report lag Amending SFFAS 6, Accounting for Property, Plant and Equipment and SFFAS 8, Supplementary Stewardship Reporting, defined deferred maintenance as RSI. The Board believed that a period of experimentation was necessary for deferred maintenance information and that classifying it as RSI would be more appropriate during the experimentation period. The Board may revise this standard based on experience gained during this time and the development of additional criteria.

(25) SFFAS 24, Selected Standards for the Consolidated Financial Report of the United States Government, clarified that all existing and future standards apply to all Federal entities, including the U.S. Government-wide Financial Statement, unless a standard specifically provides otherwise.
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Title Annotation:Official Releases
Publication:Journal of Accountancy
Date:Nov 1, 2005
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Previous Article:Exposure drafts outstanding.
Next Article:Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards No. 30--inter-entity cost implementation.


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