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Stage and costume designers working at the Italian opera in London: the evidence of the Librettos 1710-1801.

This article aims to lay out before the user some very particular information, that is, all references to personnel in the scenic and costume departments that can be found in the librettos prepared for London's Italian operas. The project is book-ended by 1710 (the year in which the first London Italian opera was staged entirely in the Italian language) and the 1800-1801 season (which is taken here as closing the eighteenth century). We should be clear at the outset what this information can be held to tell us. For a start, it is sparse and erratic at best until the arrival of Thomas Lupino as a costume designer in 1774. After this date, the printing of a scene or costume designer's or maker's name in the libretto is a regular occurrence, and does suggest his presence in London, and some association for that season. It does not, however, guarantee that he was present for the whole season, or that he designed or painted every piece of scenery, or made all the costumes used for that season. On the other hand, the lack of a designer's name in a libretto simply means that the scene designer or painter was not mentioned; there may well be other evidence showing that he was active during this period and may have contributed to the staging in question. However, the discussion below is, for the most part, intentionally limited to the information contained in the libretto books, given that they represent a very particular part of the process of staging opera, and present their own particular problems. (1)

It might be as well to ask, first, who were the libretto books for? The members of the audience at the King's Theatre and the Pantheon were, for the most part, subscribers who, by the very nature of such a system, were aristocratic, interconnected, and wealthy. They would have had the wherewithal to purchase such librettos, although whether they were always interested in doing so is quite another matter. Subscribing to the opera was, in some cases, a matter of social prestige, but in others, the very interconnectedness of the lives of some of the patrons suggests that it may simply have been a matter of desiring to attend the same events as one's friends, acquaintances, and in some cases, political allies, whatever those events--say, an opera, ridotto, or masquerade--might have been. Even among the aristocracy, fluent Italian could not be--and was not--assumed, and each book, designed for use during the performance, had facing pages, with parallel English and Italian versions of the text.

Based on performance runs, we can speculate that there were around 800 different librettos produced for the Italian opera in London, of which copies of some 85 to 90% can be located (Burden and Chowrimootoo, The Italian Opera Aria; "A movable feast"). Only one or two of many librettos exist, which suggests that their print runs--about which we know little or nothing--must have been small. Purchased on the day of the performance, they cost one shilling--the advertised price from the earliest libretto of a London opera all-sung in Italian printed in 1710 (Mancini)--until the appearance of Calzabigi's libretto for Orpheus and Euridice, which premiered on 12 May 1785, and which was priced at one shilling and sixpence. The lack of an increase before Orpheus was understandable; the annualized inflation rate between 1710 and 1785 was only 0.01%. (2) The rise for Orpheus was also understandable; the libretto contained an expensive engraved frontispiece. (3) However, once the price hike had been implemented on that one occasion, it quickly became permanent, the printer John Almon claiming during the next season to have been forced into it:

The Expense for paper and Printing being twice as much as it formerly was, the Proprietor of the Opera-Books is under the Necessity of selling them for Eighteen-pence, the cover Price given at the other Theatre for Play-Books, though uncovered, but in one Language. (Metastasio, Demetrio Introduction)

Some of the later librettos that year--Armida (De Gamerra, 1786), L'Inglese in Italia (Badini)--were marked at one shilling and sixpence, and thereafter, this price was the norm. Whether or not these prices were exactly what was paid is not clear; the librettos printed in 1744 for Aristodemo, tiranno di Cuma and Rosalinda (both by Roll!) contain the note that they cost "One Shilling, when delivered in the Theatre", suggesting that it might have been more (or less) if purchased directly from the shop or delivered to the purchaser's residence. But whether one they cost one shilling, or one shilling and sixpence, a sampling of the 1797 annual income of London's trades and professions-apothecary 150 [pounds sterling]-300 [pounds sterling], bookseller 200 [pounds sterling]-600 [pounds sterling], doctor 1,000 [pounds sterling], draper 100 [pounds sterling]-500 [pounds sterling], mercer 50 [pounds sterling]-70 [pounds sterling], stationer 200 [pounds sterling]-900 [pounds sterling]--suggests that they would have been pricey, but would not have been beyond the reach of most of those patrons who had already splashed out on an opera subscription or a ticket purchase (Olsen 140-45).

It was one of those patrons who may well have been responsible for the inclusion of the first name of a scene painter in a London libretto, Marco Ricci (1676-1730); his name appears as "Signor Marco Rizzi of Venice" in Grimaldi's 1710 libretto for L'Idaspe fedele that opened on 23 March. (4) Most of the opera's music was by Francesco Mancini, which the castrato Nicolo Grimaldi, singing as Nicolini, had brought with him from Naples. (5) It was arranged by J. C. Pepusch, and its success was doubtless due in part to Nicolini (who was regarded as a superb performer both as a singer and actor), and in part to the inclusion of a lion in the staging. (6) Ricci was part of a circle that included his uncle, Sebastiano Ricci, Giovanni Antonio Pellegrini, Antonio Bellucci, and Jacopo Amigoni, all of whom worked in England between 1708 and about 1740. As it happens, all five artists were connected with the London theatre and all were also involved in producing decorative interiors for a number of patrons. Ricci was invited to England with Pellegrini by the British ambassador at Venice, Charles Montagu, Earl of Manchester, and it may be that such aristocratic support resulted in his listing in the libretto. However, Catherine Whistler has described Ricci as "an eccentric, unstable character", which suggests that one cannot discount that it was a demand on his part (247). Assuming the staging to have been retained, revivals would certainly have been practical, and the scenery appears to have lasted until 1716, for the opera was performed in the seasons of 1710-11,1711-12,1714-15, and 1715-16. Of the four librettos that we believe to have been printed for these later performances, only one--that for the 1711-12 season--survives, and it also includes the same reference to the designer's role (Grimaldi, 1712). Ricci's input at the opera may have been limited to these sets for L'Idaspe fedele, although Lowell Lindgren speculates that he may also painted sets for other operas including those of Handel (Lindgren 96-98).

One who did paint sets for operas by the Royal Academy of Music in the 1720s is Roberto Clerici (fl. 1711-48). Clerici, a former student of Ferdinando Bibiena in Parma, came, via Vienna, to London before May 1716, when he is reported to have provided a scene, not recorded in Morselli's libretto, for Pirro e Demetrio at the King's Theatre that month, according to Highfill, Burnim and Langhans's Biographical Dictionary of Actors ... (hereafter BDA) 3:330. However, his involvement in Giovanni Porta's opera Numitore, which opened 2 April 1720, is recorded on the title page of Rolli's libretto published by Thomas Wood, where we find that the scenes were by "Signor ROBERTO CLERICI, Ingegnero della Reale Accademia" ("Engineer to the Royal Academy"). However, there is nothing Bibienesque about the scenes described in the libretto, and while it would have been interesting to have seen the most elaborate recorded, "The Field of the Lupercalian Games, with a little Temple of Pan at the further end of it", it does not appear to have reached the heights of Baroque fantasy Clerici's training might have suggested.

It would be twenty years before another scene painter was acknowledged in any form, this time to promote a single scene by a (presumed) Frenchman William De la Cour, painted for Busiri overo in van si fugge amore in 1740; the scene is the first notice of his presence in London. (7) By 1750, there is record of him as "Lacourt" painting at Covent Garden, and by 1757, at the Edinburgh Theatre, where in 1759, James Boswell noted him painting under the administration of West Dudley Digges (Boswell 50). In a later plea regarding payments, it becomes clear that as well as special scenes, De la Cour had been painting stock scenes (De la Cour). However, Boswell also referred to him as the painter of "beautiful and elegant Landschapes [sic]", noted that he was gaining "the Patronage of People of Taste in this Country", and mentioned that there was a record of portrait commissions (Croft-Murray, Decorative Painting 199-200). The single scene painted in 1740 was probably "A Field surrounded with Palms, and Pines, and Boyes, with other Plants in Blossoms" which appeared in the finale (42), for no other description in Rolli's libretto suggests anything other than a stock scene. The whole affair may well have been a piece of commercial speculation on De la Cour's part; if he was newly arrived, it would have been a way of advertising his services as a scene painter, a painter of interiors, and an executor of landscapes. The deals he claimed to have struck at Newcastle--payment for scene painting through Benefits (8)--shows him to have been open to a speculative-type approach to providing the scenes.

The next recorded scene designer noted in the librettos returns us to Italy, to Ricci, and to the wider circle of Italian painters in Britain identified by Whistler; she extends the circle far enough to include Antonio Jolli (or Joli, c. 1700-77) (Whistler 247-48). Jolli, who was born in Modena, had impeccable theatrical credentials: he studied under Antonio Rinaldi and one of the Bibienas (believed to be Francesco), and then worked in Rome under the most theatrical of all painters of caprici, Giovanni Pannini (Croft-Murray, Decorative Painting 225-26). Jolli's name appears in Rolli's libretto for Rosalinda, premiered on 31 January 1744--"Tutte le nuove Scene di queste Opera sono Invenzione e Pittura del Signor Jolli" ("With a new scene for the opera invented and painted by Signor Jolli")--an opera with music by Francesco Veracini based on Shakespeare's As You Like It. The sets required by the libretto included "a great square before the ducal palace", "the inner part of the palace shaded by a grove", "a castle surrounded by a deep moat", a three dimensional balcony, and a working drawbridge. Having made his mark here, Jolli went on to design the sets for the next full opera season, that of 1746-47. (9) There were five works, one of which--Rossane (Roll!)--was billed as "An old Opera by Mr Handel" (Scouten 1072), while the remaining four (with librettos by Vanneschi) were new to London: the pasticcio Annibale in Capua, Terradellas's Mitridate, Paradies's Petante, and Terradellas's Bellerofonte. Jolli is acknowledged--"Tutte le Scene per l'Opera, e per i Balli, sono disegnate e dipinte dal Signor Jolli" ("With the scenes for the opera and the dances designed and painted by Signor Jolli")--in all four of these librettos. The only sets on which we appear to have any comments are those of Fetonte, where George Harris recorded that he saw "fine scenery", noting the "River Po, & the sun gradually rising; a beautiful scene", and a "Temple of the Sun, very grand & showy" (Burrows and Dunhill 234).

The inclusion of Jolli's name reflects the revolutionary nature of this opera season; fronted by the impresario Francesco Vanneschi, it showed an effort to co-ordinate and integrate not only scene design, but also choruses and dances into the writing and staging of opera (Burden, "Integrating dance"). The librettos for the season, starting with Annibale in Capua, acknowledged both the scene designer and the choreographer--"Inventore de' Balli Signor Aloar" ("Inventor of the dances Signor Aloar")--an outward indication that reflected efforts to establish this new approach to operatic writing. Ironically, when Jolli was in charge of the Opera as he seems to have been in 1747-48--at the least, the foreword to the libretto of Semiramide riconosciuta that premiered on 7 May 1748 suggests that he was (10)--only the cast members and the composer are listed.

The inclusion in the librettos of the names of Ricci, De la Cour and Jolli are all advertisements of different sorts. As well as scene painters, Ricci and De la Cour were artists, and as foreigners establishing themselves in London would need to be noticed. In Ricci's case, being noticed as already the recipient of aristocratic patronage would have been a further advantage. Jolli was of a different order. The inclusion of his name appears to have reflected particular ideas about how productions should be conceived, but he, too, had private patrons, and he is recorded working for Sarah Lennox, Duchess of Richmond, at Temple Newsam, and at Fonthill House. It has also been argued that he was responsible for the painted hall at impresario John James Heidegger's house at Richmond (Croft-Murray, "The Painted Hall").

After the 1746-47 season, no name associated with scenes would again appear in a libretto until 1766-67, when the names of Vincenzo Conti and Signor Bigari were included in the anonymous libretto of Gli stravaganti; o sia, i matrimoniali alia moda, which opened on 21 October 1766. With this acknowledgement, a change in scope is indicated: Conti and Bigari were not simply listed as set painters, but as machinists as well: "Pittori, e Machinisti" ("Painters and Machinists"). On this basis, it is possible to consider the Conti and Bigari team as set designers, rather than painters. It seems unlikely, for example, that Jolli or De la Cour had anything to do with actually designing or building the sets in question, whereas the references to machines indicates a closer relationship to the mechanics of all aspects of the scenery. Although there are one or two self-explanatory variations before the end of the century, after this season the acknowledgement of the scenic department is made in similar forms on a regular basis.

So much for the scenes and machines: the dresses would have to wait until 1773 for the first record of the costumier's input. In that year, the role of "pattern drawer for the dresses" was ascribed to Simon Frederic Moenick in the 1773 libretto of Tamerlano (Bottarelli), suggesting a design role only. The following year, however, in Coltellini's libretto of La contessina (which opened on 11 January), we find the name of Thomas Lupino, the man who would design costumes for the King's Theatre for almost ninety productions over eighteen seasons. Lupino is recorded as being active in London as a costume maker and supplier from the late 1750s, and A Biographical Dictionary (hereafter BDA) suggests that he started at the King's Theatre in the 1775-76 season (9:383). The librettos, however, indicate otherwise, with his name appearing not only in the 1774 La contessina, but in the printings of Antigono (Metastasio), Nitteti (Metastasio), and Verseo (De Gamerra) of the same year. His name disappears from the librettos in 1791 after the Pantheon fire. The librettos do, in fact, suggest that there was a hiatus in his career at this point: BDA does not place him back at Covent Garden until the 1794-95 season, while the King's Theatre librettos list Vincenzio Sestini as the maker of the dresses from 1792 until 1795. In fact, Lupino's name never again appears in a London Italian opera libretto. His surviving designs are, however, some of the few illustrations we possess that can be regarded as a reliable guide when envisioning dance costumes for the eighteenth-century London stage. (11)

Some of the more precise descriptions of roles, found in the table below, belong to the librettos from the Italian opera at the Pantheon (12)--most particularly that from De Gamerra's 1791 Armida (see illustration p.133). With the exception of that for La pastorella nobile (Zini), the Pantheon's 1791 librettos--Armida (De Gamerra), La bella pescatrice (Zini), Idalide (Moretti), La locanda (Bottarelli), La molinarella (Bottarelli), and Quinto Fabio (Andrei) and La discordia conjugale from 1792 (Lorenzi)--signalled a distinct change in the quality of information provided. The listings of the names of the singers and dancers appeared pretty much as they had in previous seasons, and the chorus and supernumeraries were obviously too low down the pecking order to rate a mention, but there was a considerable expansion of the listing of personnel in the production departments. In the Armida libretto, we find not only Lupino's name as the maker of the dresses, but both Francesco Bartolozzi and Henry Tresham listed as the authors of the original drawings, William Hodges as the "painter and inventor of the decorations", and a Monsieur Bernard credited separately as the machinist.

The inclusion of these names does give some clue to the ambitions--both operatic and social--of the Pantheon opera. Francesco Bartolozzi was one of the most fashionable engravers. Henry Tresham, a history painter, had been elected an Associate of the Royal Academy that year, while William Hodges, another history painter and already an RA, had travelled the world with James Cook, and was well known through the published engravings for Cook's journals. Even M. Bernard, the machinist, is listed as "from the Opera, Paris". When this information is combined with the listing of the rest of the supporting crew--two composers, a poet, a translator, the leader of the band, the leader of the ballets, and the ballet master--an attendee could feel that he or she was where the artistic action was. As it happened, it was also symptomatic of the feeling that the promoters wanted to emphasise a break with the past problems of the King's Theatre (Milhous, Dideriksen, and Hume 3-62).

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Some of the 1791 librettos were also larger than normal: in the cases of Armida (De Gamerra), and La bella pescatrice (Zini), and also in related Pantheon publications, such as the ballet descriptions of D'Auberval's Amphion and Thalia and his Telemachus, and the anonymous Description of the allegory, painted for the curtain of the King's Theatre, Pantheon the usual octavo format was replaced by the larger quarto.

The information in the table that follows provides a comprehensive overview of the information contained in the London librettos printed for the Italian opera. The listing of the sources from which this information comes will help to pinpoint just where those references appear. It can be used to adjust our current perceptions of some personnel, and confirm what we know from other sources. These adjustments are both large and small, the example given above of Thomas Lupino being a case in point; one more important one will suffice as a further illustration.

One of the most interesting and important designers associated with the Opera House was Michael Novosielski (1750-95), a Rome-born "scene painter, architect, machinist, designer, [and] entrepreneur" (BDA 11: 78). His date of arrival in England is unknown, but he is recorded working at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, by 23 May 1777. Sybil Rosenfeld ("Novosielski"), Christopher Baugh, and BDA (11: 79) simply give at the date of his move to the King's Theatre as 1781. The authors of BDA, however, also suggest an arrival in the "1780-1781" season, but of the three librettos they cite, all--Mitridate (Anon), Il barone di Torreforte (Anon), and Piramo e Tisbe (Coltellini)--are from 1781, and do not, therefore, support the authors' date range of 1780-81. Yet the two librettos cited here--Ricimero (Anon) and Le serve rivali (Chiari)--are for runs of performances that started on 2 and 19 December 1780 respectively. Moreover, Ricimero opened the season, thereby placing Novolsielski at the King's from its start. Given his later input into the design and architecture of the building, this is also suggestive of a greater involvement with the administration than may otherwise be thought.

What the introduction above does emphasise, though, is that the make-up of an eighteenth-century London libretto was an arbitrary business, governed by such factors as the balance of power in the administration, the desire of that administration to present a particular image, or even the assiduousness of the theatre copyist preparing the version for the printer; the careful presentation of all those who were truly involved in the season was not a priority, nor, indeed, of interest. Caveat utilitor!

Stage and Costume designers working at the Italian Opera in London the evidence of the librettos

1) The alphabetisation is by letter order.

2) The names of the designers are given in the form surname, christian name. In the cases where only the designer's title or initial is known, this information is contained in {} to indicate that nothing more is as yet known.

3) Those names marked with an asterisk * are omitted from BDA.

4) The linguistic form (or forms) of the role as given in the libretto appears under the listing of the name.

5) The dates in column three indicate the seasons in which the designer is recorded by the librettos as working in London. When [] appear within a run of dates, these indicate that there is no record in the librettos of the designer working in London in those years.

6) Those librettos marked with a [dagger] were produced for the King's Theatre at the Pantheon.

7) The date in parentheses after the title of the opera is that date that appears printed on the libretto title page. A forward slash indicates that there is more than one libretto for that version of the opera associated with that year. The number that follows the forward slash gives the possible chronological position of that libretto in the sequence.

8) The pressmark of each libretto is preceded by the holder's sigla as listed by Repertoire International des Sources Musicales (RISM).

9) The square brackets contain the CS and ESTC numbers of the libretto. The CS number is that of Claudio Sartori. I librettos italiani a stampa dalle origini al 1800: catalogo analitico. Cuneo: Bertola & Locatelli, 1990; nCS indicates that that edition of the libretto is not listed by Sartori. The ESTC number is that given to the libretto by the English Short Title Catalogue, online at the British Library; nESTC indicates that that edition of the libretto is not listed in the ESTC.
Designer Dates London
 seasons

Bartolozzi, Francesco * 1725-1815 1790-91
dresses executed from original
drawings by'

Benard, {M.} fl.1790-93 1790-91
'machinist'

Bigari, Francesco Painter and fl.1766-72 1766-67
Machinist'; 'Pittori, 1767-68
machinisti, e dirrectori dello 1768-69
scenari'; Pittori e 1769-70
Machinisti'; 'Direttore dello 1770-71
scenario' 1771-72

Bigari junior, Francesco * (1) fl. 1769-72 1769-70
'painter and machinist' []
 1771-72

Bigheri, (Sig.) * fl. 1793 1792-93
pittore e machinista'

Canter, James 'Pittore e fl. 1761-83 (2) 1767-68
Macchinista'; 'painter and 1768-69
machinist'; 'scene painter and []
machinist' 1773-74

Clerici, Roberto Ingegnero (fl. 1711-48) 1719-20
della Reale Accademia';
'Engineer to the Royal
Academy'

Colomba, Giovanni Battista 1717-93 1773-74
Innocenzo Pittorre e 1775-76
Machinista'; 'Painter and 1776-77
machinist' 1777-78
 1778-79
 1779-80

Conti, Vincenzo Pittori, fl. 1766-96 1766-67
machinisti, e dirrectori dello 1767-68
scenari'; 'Pittori e
Machinisti'

De la Cour, William fl. 1740-63 1739-40
'Le nuove scene sono di ...'

Hodges, William 1744-97 1790-91
'Painter and inventor of the
decorations'

Jolli, Antonio 'Tutte le scene c. 1700-77 1743-44
per l'Opera, e per i Balli, []
sono disegnate e dipinte dal 1746-47
...'

Lion, [Sig.) * fl. 1780-81 1780-81
'director of the scenes'

Lupino, Thomas Tailor and fl. 1757-1814? 1773-74 (3)
Inventor of the dresses'; 1774-75
Tailor'; 'dresses executed 1775-76
by'; 'Sartore'; 'Inventor and 1776-77
maker of the dresses'; 1777-78
'Inventor and master of the 1778-79
dresses' 1779-80
 1780-81
 1781-82
 1782-83
 1783-84
 1784-85
 1785-86
 1786-87
 1787-88
 1788-89
 1789-90
 1790-91

Marinan, Gaetano 1764-1844 1786-87
'painter and machinist' 1787-88
 1788-89
 1789-90
 1790-91
 []
 1792-93
 1793-94
 1794-95

Moenick, Simon Frederic (also 1746-1837 1772-73 (4)
Moeunich, Moench) painter';
'pittore e designatore degli
abiti'; 'painter and pattern
drawer for the dresses'

Novosielski, Michael (usually 1750-95 1780-81 (5)
Novecelleschi) 'Painter and 1781-82
Machinist'; 'Painter and 1782-83
Inventor of the decorations' 1783-84
 1784-85
 []
 1794-95

Obelmann, {Sig.} (usually fl.1774-786 1774-75
Obelman) 'sartore'; 'sartori' []
(with Richter) 1776-77
 1777-78

Rebecca, [Biagio?] c.1735-1808 1785-86
'painter and machinist'

Richter, (Sig.) fl. 1776-78 1777-78
'sartori' (with Obelmann)

Rizzi, Marco 1676-1730 1709-10
'senes painted by..' []
 1711-12

Sestini, Vincenzio the fl. 1775-1800 1784-85
dresses by'; 'tailor, and []
inventor of the dresses' 1788-89
 1789-90
 []
 1792-93
 1793-94
 1794-95

Tresham, Henry 'dresses c. 1751-1814 1790-91
executed from original
drawings by'

Waldre, Vincent c. 1742-1814 1777-78
'pittore, e machinista'

Designer Opera librettos

Bartolozzi, Francesco * ([dagger]) Armida (1791) GB-Lbl
dresses executed from original 11778.C.3. [CS: 2710; ESTC: T70691]
drawings by'

Benard, {M.} ([dagger]) Armida (1791) GB-Lbl
'machinist' 11778.C.3. [CS: 2710; ESTC: T70691];
 ([dagger]) La bella pescatrice (1791)
 GB-Lbl 163.g.55. [CS: 3900; ESTC:
 T90000]; ([dagger]) Idalide (1791-2)
 GB-Lbl 907.k.4.(l.) [CS: 12631; ESTC:
 T55177]; ([dagger]) Quinto Fabio
 (1791-2) GB-Lbl 163.g.43. [CS: 19412;
 ESTC: T70232].

Bigari, Francesco Painter and Astarto, re di Tiro (1770) GB-Lbl
Machinist'; 'Pittori, 907.i.13.(5.) [CS: 3258; ESTC:
machinisti, e dirrectori dello T70484]; La buona figliuola (1766) GB-
scenari'; Pittori e Lbl 11714.b.39.(5.) [CS: 4194; ESTC:
Machinisti'; 'Direttore dello T29778]; La buona figliuola (1767-3)
scenario' GB-Lbl 11714b.39.(5.) [CS: 4199; ESTC:
 T69492]; La buona figliuola maritata
 (1767) GB-Lbl 11714.aa.13.(6.) [CS:
 4264; ESTC: T69492]; La buona
 figliuola maritata (1768) US-Lau ML 48
 C73 V.2 [CS: 4265; ESTC: N15263];
 Carattaco (1767) GB-Lbl
 907.i.10.(10.) [CS: 5090; ESTC:
 T19932]; La conquista delMessico
 (1767) GB-Lbl RB.23.b.1222 [CS: 6240;
 ESTC: T224129]; La contadina in corte
 (1771-2) GB-Lbl 907.i.14.(1.) [CS:
 6312; ESTC: T70017]; Le con tadine
 bizzarre (1769-2) GB-Lbl 907.i.12.(6.)
 [CS: 6353; ESTC: T34000]; Cosroe
 (1770) GB-Ob Harding D 2450 (3) [nCS;
 ESTC: T185237]; La costanza di
 Rosinella (1770) GB-Lbl 1342.m.3. [CS:
 6788; ESTC: T106529]; Ezio (1767) GB-
 Lbl RB.23.a.7960 [nCS; ESTC: T184310];
 Il filosofo di campagna (1768-1) GB-O
 b Harding D 2445 (3) [nCS; ESTC:
 T2221U]; 11 filosofo di campagna
 (1768-2) GB-Ob Harding D 2445 (5)
 [nCS; ESTC: T222112]; Il filosofo di
 campagna (1768-3) GB-Ob Harding D
 2445 (1) [nCS; ESTC: N49080]; Ifigenia
 in Aulide (1768) GB-Lbl
 H714.aa.21.(8.) [CS: 12727; ESTC:
 T36977]; La moglie fedele (1768) US-
 LAu ML48 C73 v.3 [CS: 15768; ESTC:
 N20776]; L'olimpiade (1770) GB-Lbl
 U716.aa.16. [nCS; ESTC: T72072]; Orfeo
 ed Euridice (1770) GB-Lbl
 11714.aa.21.(5.) [CS: 17432; ESTC:
 T43414]; Orfeo ed Euridice (1771) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.ll.(7.) [CS: 17436; ESTC:
 T43415]; Il padre e ilfiglio rivali
 (1769) GB-Lbl 907.112.(5.) [CS: 17689;
 ESTC: T43554]; Le pazzie d'Orlando
 (1771-2) GB-Lbl T1777.bb.4.(l.) [CS:
 18249; ESTC: T43800]; Il ratto delta
 sposa (1768) GB-Lbl 11714.aa.21.(4.)
 [CS: 19529; ESTC: T46307];
 La schiava (1767) GB-Lbl 1508-238.
 [nCS; ESTC: T129438]; Semiramide
 riconosciuta (imp.) GB-Ob 17405.e.21
 (5) [CS: 21587; ESTC: T70481];
 Sesostri (1768) GB-Lbl 907.i.12.(3.)
 [CS: 21890; ESTC: T47970]; Sifare
 (1767) GB-Lbl 907X10.(9.) [CS: 21976;
 ESTC: T48271]; Sifare (1768) GB-Ob
 Harding D 2445 (2) [nCS; nESTC]; Gli
 stravaganti; o sia, i matrimonian alla
 moda (1766) GB-Lbl 11775.e.3.(3.) [CS:
 22684; ESTC: T48732]; Tigrane (1767)
 GB-Lbl 1342.m.2. [CS: 23147; ESTC:
 T106528]; Trackebarne gran mogol
 (1766) GB-Lbl 16088-4555.(1.) [nCS;
 ESTC: T121185]; Gli uccellatori (1770)
 GB-Lbl 907.i.9.(4.) [CS: 24191; ESTC:
 T70477]; I viaggiatori tornati in
 Italia (1772) GB-Lbl 639.f.27.(3.)
 [CS: 24817; ESTC: T68800 & T200344?];
 Le vicende della sorte (1770) GB-Lbl
 907.i.13.(4.) [CS: 24855; ESTC:
 T70482].

Bigari junior, Francesco * (1) Il camovale di Venezia; o sia, La
'painter and machinist' virtuosa (1772) GB-Lbl 907.i.14.(4.)
 [CS: 5141; ESTC: T69481]; Il disertore
 (1770) GB-Lbl 639.f.27.(2.) [CS: 7964;
 ESTC: T68799]; Ezio (1770) GB-Lbl
 11775.e.3.(4.) [CS: 9525; ESTC:
 T33936].

Bigheri, (Sig.) * Odenato e Zenobia ([1793J/2) PL-Kj
pittore e machinista' Lit. ang. 280II [nCS; ESTC: T230197].

Canter, James 'Pittore e Gli amanti ridicoli (1768) GB-Lbl
Macchinista'; 'painter and 907.i.12.(2.) [CS: 1147; ESTC:
machinist'; 'scene painter and T21798]; Antigono (1774) GB-Lbl
machinist' RB.23.a.8558 [nCS; ESTC: T224722];
 Arianna e leseo (1768) GB-Lbl 1608-
 4555.(3.) [CS: 2594; ESTC: T121174];
 Armida (1774) GB-Lbl 907.i.14.(9.) [CS
 2692; ESTC: T70473]; La contessina
 (1774) GB-Lbl 162.g.19. [CS: 6478;
 ESTC: T71124]; Le donne vendicate
 (1769) GB-Lbl 907.i.12.(4.) [CS: 8314;
 nESTC]; Lucio Vero (1773-2) GB-Lbl
 907.i.15.(2.) [CS: 14253; ESTC:
 T69513]; Il mercato di Malmantile
 (1769) US-U X782.1 F52M 1769 [CS:
 15467; ESTC: N67684]; Nanetta e Lubino
 (1769) GB-Lbl 907.i.13.(1.) [CS:
 16234; ESTC: T70468]; Nitteti (1774)
 GB-Lbl 907.i.14.(7.) [CS: 16570; ESTC:
 T69501]; L'olimpiade (1774) GB-Ob
 Harding D 2448 (7) [CS: 17011; ESTC:
 T186117]; Perseo (1774) GB-Lbl
 907.k.1.(5.) [CS: 18549; ESTC:
 T89947]; Ilpuntiglio amoroso (1773)
 GB-Lbl 11715.cc.10.(1.) [CS 19325;
 ESTC: T133153]; Il ratto della sposa
 (1768) GB-Lbl U714.aa.21.(4.) [CS:
 19529; ESTC: T46307]; Il re alia
 caccia (1769) GB-Ob Harding D 2445 (6)
 [CS: 19562; ESTC: T68801]; Le serve
 rivali (1769) GB-Lbl 907.i.13.(2.)
 [CS: 21864; ESTC: T70474]; Il signor
 dottore (1767) GB-Lbl 907.i.12.(1.)
 [CS: 22001; ESTC: T48273].

Clerici, Roberto Ingegnero Numitore GB-Ob Harding D 2442 (2)
della Reale Accademia'; [CS: 16812; ESTC: T43211].
'Engineer to the Royal
Academy'

Colomba, Giovanni Battista Alcina (1776) D-Sl Fr.D.oct.4547 [nCS;
Innocenzo Pittorre e nESTC]; Alessandro nell'Indie GB-Ob
Machinista'; 'Painter and Harding D. 2449 (3) [CS: 811; ESTC:
machinist' T72071]; Alessandro nell'Indie GB-Lbl
 907.i.17.(1.) [CS: 821; ESTC: T89977];
 Le ali d'amore (1776) GB-Lbl 907.1.15.
 (5.) [CS: 90 4; ESTC: T69479]; Le ali
 d'amore (1777) GB-Lbl 907.1.16. (2.)
 [CS: 905; ESTC: T89963]; L'amore
 soldato (1780) GB-Lbl 907.i.16.(9.)
 [CS: 1758; ESTC: T70483]; Antigono
 (1774) GB-Lbl RB.23.a.8558 [nCS; ESTC:
 T224722]; Antigono (1776) GB-Lbl
 907.i.16.(1.) [CS: 2172; ESTC:
 T89973]; Armida (1774) GB-Lbl
 907.i.14.(9.) [CS 2692; ESTC:
 T70473]; Artaserse (1779) GB-Ob
 Harding D 2446 (5) [CS: 3082; ESTC:
 T186547]; Astarto (1776) US-NHub ML48
 L698 v.9 no.5 [CS: 3255; ESTC:
 T22961]; L'avaro deluso (1778-2) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.16.(10.) [CS: 3557; ESTC:
 T89964]; Il bacio (1776) GB-Lbl
 11714.b.10.(2.) [CS: 3628; ESTC:
 T68798]; Caio Mario (1776-2) GB-Lbl
 907.i.14.(12.) [CS: 4460; ESTC:
 T70019]; La contadina in corte (1779-
 2) GB-Lbl 1508-320. [CS: 6322; ESTC:
 T130062]; La contessina (1774) GB-Lbl
 162.g.l9. [CS: 6478; ESTC: T71124];
 Demofoonte (1778) GB-Lbl 907.i.16.(8.)
 [CS: 7566; ESTC: T89975]; Didone
 abbandonata (1775-2) GB-Lbl
 907.i.15.(4.) [CS: 7838; ESTC:
 T69508]; La donna di spirito (1775)
 GB-Lbl 907.i.14.(8.) [CS: 8241; ESTC:
 T70002]; Il duca d'Atene (1780) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.17.(2.) [CS: 8398; ESTC:
 T89983]; Enea, e Lavinia (1779-2) GB-
 Lbl 1342.k.4. [CS: 8871; ESTC:
 T88662]; La fraschetana (1776-1) D-Gs
 8 P DRAM IV, 7090 [nCS; ESTC:
 T161588]; La fraschetana (1776-2) GB-
 Lbl 1490.m.64. [CS 10959; ESTC:
 T75751]; La frascatana (1778) GB-Lbl
 1342.m.5 [CS: 10976; ESTC: T89971];
 Germondo (1776-2) GB-Lbl
 11714.b.ll.(1.) [CS: 11565; ESTC:
 T72409]; La governante (1779-2) GB-
 Lbl 11777.bb.4.(2.) [CS: 12444; ESTC:
 T9086]; Visola d'amore (1776) GB-Lbl
 1490.m.65. [nCS; ESTC: T75752]; Lucio
 Vero (1773-2) GB-Lbl 907.i.15.(2.)
 [CS: 14253; ESTC: T69513]; La marchesa
 giardiniera (1775) EIRE-Dn LO 8683
 [CS: 14726; ESTC: T172681]; Motezuma
 (1775) GB-Lbl 11715.C.19. [CS: 15160;
 ESTC: T70470]; Nitteti (1774) GB-Lbl
 907.i.14.(7.) [CS: 16570; ESTC:
 T69501]; L'olimpiade (1774) GB-Ob
 Harding D 2448 (7) [CS: A1
 [nCS; ESTC: N42151]; Perseo (1774) GB-
 Lbl 907.k.l.(5.) [CS: 18549; ESTC:
 T89947]; Piramo e Tisbe (1775) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.14.(11.) [CS: 18742; ESTC:
 T70013]; Piramo e Tisbe (1776) GB-Lbl
 907.i.15.(6.) [CS: 18743; ESTC:
 T69487]; Il puntiglio amoroso (1773)
 GB-Lbl 11715.cc.l0.(1.) [CS: 19325;
 ESTC: T133153]; Quinto Fabio (1780-2)
 GB-Lbl 11714.cc.4. [CS: 19400; ESTC:
 T70467]; Quinto Fabio (1780-3) F-Pn
 Res.V.S.600 [CS: 19401; nESTC];
 Rinaldo (1780) GB-Lbl 907.i.17.(3.)
 [CS: 19849; ESTC: T89988]; La Schiava
 (1780) GB-Cu MR463.b.75.2 [nCS;
 nESTC]; La sposa fedele (1775-2) US-
 Plc Rare O Ital Gug 52324.D.5 [nCS;
 ESTC: N37479]; Telemaco (1777) GB-Lbl
 1508-431. [CS: 22896; ESTC: T129744];
 La vestale (1776) GB-Ob Harding D 2448
 (4) [CS: 24738; ESTC: T69480]; Zemira
 e Azore (1779-2) GB-Lbl 907.i.11.(8.)
 [CS: 25290; ESTC: T52923].

Conti, Vincenzo Pittori, La buona figliuola (1766) GB/Lbl
machinisti, e dirrectori dello 11714b.39.(5.) [CS: 4194; ESTC:
scenari'; 'Pittori e T29778]; La buona figliuola (1767/3)
Machinisti' GB/Lbl 11714.b.39.(5.) [CS: 4199;
 ESTC: T69492]; La buona figliuola
 maritata (1767) GB/Lbl U714.aa.13.(6.)
 [CS: 4264; ESTC: T69492]; La buona
 figliuola maritata (1768) US/Lau ML
 48 C73 V.2 [CS: 4265; ESTC: N15263];
 Carattaco (1767) GB/Lbl 907.i.10.(10.)
 [CS: 5090; ESTC: T19932]; La conquista
 del Messico (1767) GB/Lbl
 RB.23.b.1222 [CS: 6240; ESTC:
 T224129]; Ezio (1767) GB/Lbl
 RB.23.a.7960 [nCS; ESTC: T184310]; Il
 filosofo di campagna (1768/1) GB/Ob
 Harding D 2445 (3) [nCS; ESTC:
 T222111]; Il filosofo di campagna
 (1768/2) GB/Ob Harding D 2445 (5)
 [nCS; ESTC: T222112]; Il filosofo di
 campagna (1768/3) GB/Ob Harding D
 2445 (1) [nCS; ESTC: N49080]; Ifigenia
 inAulide (1768) GB/Lbl U714.aa.21.(8.)
 [CS: 12727; ESTC: T36977]; La moglie
 fedele (1768) US/LAu ML48 C73 v.3 [CS:
 15768; ESTC: N20776]; Il ratto della
 sposa (1768) GB/Lbl U714.aa.21.(4.)
 [CS: 19529; ESTC: T46307]; La schiava
 (1767) GB/Lbl 1508/238. [nCS; ESTC:
 T129438]; Sesostri (1768) GB/Lbl
 907.i.12.(3.) [CS: 21890; ESTC:
 T47970]; Sifare (1767) GB/Lbl
 907X10.(9.) [CS: 21976; ESTC: T48271];
 Sifare (1768) GB/Ob Harding D 2445
 (2) [nCS; nESTC]; Il signor dottore
 (1767) GB/Lbl 907X12.(1.) [CS: 22001;
 ESTC: T48273]; Gli stravaganti; o sia,
 i matrimonian alia moda (1766?) GB/
 Lbl 11775.e.3.(3.) [CS: 22684; ESTC:
 T48732]; Tigrane (1767) GB/Lbl
 1342.m.2. [CS: 23147; ESTC: T106528];
 Trackebarne gran mogol (1766) GB/Lbl
 16088/4555.(1.) [nCS; ESTC: T121185].

De la Cour, William Busiri; overo, In van si fugge atnore
'Le nuove scene sono di ...' (1740) GB-Lbl 907.i.3.(8.) [CS: 4297;
 ETSC: T89957].

Hodges, William ([dagger]) Armida (1791) GB-Lbl
'Painter and inventor of the 11778.C.3. [CS: 2710; ESTC: T70691];
decorations' ([dagger]) La bella pescatrice (1791)
 GB-Lbl 163.g.55. [CS: 3900; ESTC:
 T90000]; ([dagger]) ldalide (1791-2)
 GB-Lbl 907.k.4.(1.) [CS: 12631; ESTC:
 T55177].

Jolli, Antonio 'Tutte le scene Annibale in Capua (1746) GB-Lbl
per l'Opera, e per i Balli, 639.d.22.(6.) [CS: 2041; ESTC:
sono disegnate e dipinte dal T21899]; Antigono (1746) GB-Lv Plays
...' 90 (1) [CS: 2118; ESTC: N30384];
 Fetonte (1747-2) GB-Lbl 639.d.22.(7.)
 [CS: 10112; ESTC: T35492]; Mitridate
 (1746) GB-Lbl 907.i.5.(7.) [CS: 15655;
 ESTC: T39540]; Rosalinda (1744) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.4.(8.) [CS: 20146; ESTC:
 T69041].

Lion, [Sig.) * Il barone di Torreforte (1781-2) GB-
'director of the scenes' Lbl 907X17.(6.) [CS: 3806; ESTC:
 T89980]; Mitridate (1781-2) GB-Lbl
 907.i.15.(9.) [CS: 15661; ESTC:
 T70007].

Lupino, Thomas Tailor and Alcina (1776) D-Sl Fr.D.oct.4547 [nCS;
Inventor of the dresses'; nESTC]; L'albergatrice vivace (1783-
Tailor'; 'dresses executed 2) GB-Lbl 907,i,18.(3.) [CS: 561;
by'; 'Sartore'; 'Inventor and ESTC: T71785]; Alceste (1786-2) US-AA
maker of the dresses'; RBR PR4049.B15M6 [CS: 600; ESTC:
'Inventor and master of the N29644]; Alessandro nell'Indie GB-
dresses' Lbl 907.i.17.(1.) [CS: 821; ESTC:
 T89977]; Le ali d'amore (1776) GB-Lbl
 907.i.15.(5.) [CS: 904; ESTC: T69479];
 L'amore protetto dal cielo; o sia, La
 vestale (1787-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.l.(7.)
 [CS: 1727; ESTC: T90002]; L'amore
 soldato (1780) GB-Lbl 907.i.16.(9.)
 [CS: 1758; ESTC: T70483]; Antigono
 (1774) GB-Lbl RB.23.a.8558 [nCS;
 ESTC: T224722]; Antigono (1776) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.16.(1.) [CS: 2172; ESTC:
 T89973]; Armida (1786-2) GB-Lbl
 11778.aaa.18. [CS: 2707; ESTC:
 T70690]; ([dagger]) Armida (1791) GB-
 Lbl 11778.C.3. [CS: 2710; ESTC:
 T70691]; Artaserse (1779) GB-Ob
 Harding D 2446 (5) [CS: 3082; ESTC:
 T186547]; Astarto (1776) US-NHub ML48
 L698 v.9 no.5 [CS: 3255; ESTC:
 T22961]; L'avaro deluso (1778-2) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.16.(10.) [CS: 3557; ESTC:
 T89964]; Il bacio (1776) GB-Lbl
 H714.b.10.(2.) [CS: 3628; ESTC:
 T68798]; Il barone di Torreforte
 (1781-2) GB-Lbl 907.1.17.(6.) [CS:
 3806; ESTC: T89980]; ([dagger]) La
 bella pescatrice (1791) GB-Lbl
 163.g.55. [CS: 3900; ESTC: T90000];
 Caio Mario (1776-2) GB-Lbl
 907.i.14.(12.) [CS: 4460; ESTC:
 T70019]; La cameriera astuta (1788-2)
 US-Ch TS 8092-642.1788 [CS: 4588;
 ESTC: N72292]; La contadina in corte
 (1779-2) GB-Lbl 1508-320. [CS: 6322;
 ESTC: T130062]; Il convito (1782-2)
 GB-Lbl 907.i.18.(1.) [CS: 6596; ESTC:
 T71453]; Demofoonte (1778) GB-Lbl
 907.i.16.(8.) [CS: 7566; ESTC:
 T89975]; Didone abbandonata (1775-2)
 GB-Lbl 907X15.(4.) [CS: 7838; ESTC:
 T69508]; ([dagger]) La discordia
 conjugale (1792-2) GB-Lbl
 907.k.3.(6.) [CS: 7941;
 ESCT: T89952]; Il duca d'Atene
 (1780) GB-Lbl 907X17.(2.) [CS: 8398;
 ESTC: T89983]; Le due getnelle (1784-
 2) GB-Lbl 907X18.(12.) [CS: 8500;
 ESTC: T71459]; Enea e Lavinia (1779-
 2) GB-Lbl 1342.k.4. [CS: 8871; ESTC:
 T88662]; L'eroe cinese (1782-2) GB-
 Lbl 907X15.(10.) [CS: 9206; ESTC:
 T69500]; L'eroe cinese (1782-3) US-Ws
 205504 [nCS; ESTC: N68145]; L'eroe
 cinese (1784) GB-Lbl 907.k.l.(2.) [CS:
 9208; ESTC: T89953]; La fraschetana
 (1776-1) D-Gs 8 P DRAM IV, 7090 [nCS;
 ESTC: T161588]; La fraschetana (1776-
 2) GB-Lbl 1490.m.64. [CS 10959; ESTC:
 T75751]; La frascatana (1778) GB-Lbl
 1342.m.5. [CS: 10976; ESTC: T89971];
 La frascatana (1781) GB-Lbl
 H775.e.3.(5.) [nCS; ESTC: T40155]; Le
 gelosie villane (1784-2) GB-Lbl
 907.k.l.(3.) [CS: 11413; ESTC:
 T89948]; Germondo (1776-2) GB-Lbl
 H714.b.ll.(1.) [CS: 11565; ESTC:
 T72409]; Giannina e Bernardorne (1787-
 2) GB-Lbl 907.k.l.(ll.) [CS: 11748;
 ESTC: T89950]; Giulio Cesare in Egitto
 (1787-2) GB-Lbl 1342.k.34. [CS: 12214;
 ESTC: T71450]; Giulio Sabino (1788-2)
 GB-Lbl 907.k.2.(1.) [CS: 12239; ESTC:
 T71792]; La governante (1779-2) GB-
 Lbl H777.bb.4.(2.) [CS: 12444; ESTC:
 T9086]; ([dagger]) Idalide (1791-2)
 GB-Lbl 907.k.4.(1.) [CS: 12631; ESTC:
 T55177]; L'inglese in Italia (1786-2)
 US-PHlc O Ital Anfo 52326.D.7 [CS:
 13205; ESTC: N29096]; L'isola d'amore
 (1776) GB-Lbl 1490.m.65. [nCS; ESTC:
 T75752]; Issipile (1784) I-Bc 268 [CS:
 13928; nESTC]; La locanda (1792) GB-
 Lbl 907.k.3.(2.) [CS: 14360; ESTC:
 T90003]; La locandiera (1788) GB-Lbl
 H777.cc.1.(2.) [CS: 14375; ESTC:
 T17111]; Il marchese Tulipano (1786-
 2) D-Mbs Fiche L.eleg.m. 3780 [CS:
 14747; nESTC]; Mitridate (1781-2) GB-
 Lbl 907X15.(9.) [CS: 15661; ESTC:
 T70007]; ([dagger]) La molinarella
 (1791-2) US-Ch * EC75 R2727 795db [CS:
 15828; ESTC: N12471]; Nitteti (1774)
 GB-Lbl 907X14.(7.) [CS: 16570; ESTC:
 T69501]; L'olimpiade (1788-2) GB-Lbl
 907.k.2.(4.) [CS: 17038; ESTC:
 T71456]; Verseo (1774) GB-Lbl
 907.k.l.(5.) [CS: 18549; ESTC:
 T89947]; Verseo (1786) US-Wc ML50.2
 .P333 S2 Case [CS: 18551; nESTC];
 Viramo e Tisbe (1776) GB-Lbl
 907X15.(6.) [CS: 18743; ESTC: T69487];
 Viramo e Tisbe (1781) GB-Lbl 163.g.56.
 [CS: 18746; ESTC: T70236]; Quinto
 Fabio (1780-2) GB-Lbl
 11714.CC.4. [CS: 19400; ESTC: T70467];
 Quinto Fabio (1780-3) F-Pn Res.V.S.600
 [CS: 19401; nESTC]; ([dagger]) Quinto
 Fabio (1791-2) GB-Lbl 163.g.43. [CS:
 19412; ESTC: T70232]; Il re Teodoro in
 Venezia (1787-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.l.(8.)
 [CS: 19642a; ESTC: T89946]; Ricimero
 (1780) F-Pn Res. V.S.721 [CS: 19810;
 nESTC]; Rinaldo (1780) GB-Lbl
 907.i.17.(3.) [CS: 19849; ESTC:
 T89988]; I rivali delusi (1784-2) GB-
 Lbl 907X18.(10.) [CS: 20021; ESTC:
 T71447]; Gli schiavi per amore (1787)
 GB-Lbl 1342.k.29. [CS: 21225; ESTC:
 T100202]; Gli schiavi per amore (1788-
 2) US-Cn V. 461. 656 [CS: 21227; ESTC:
 N64045]; La scuola de' gelosi (1786-
 2) US-NHub ML50 S165 S4 [nCS; nESTC];
 Le serve rivali (1780) US-CAe Mus
 589.219 [CS: 21872; nESTC]; Lucio
 Silla (1783) GB-Lbl 907X18.(8.) [CS:
 22022; ESTC: T71791]; La sposa fedele
 (1775-2) US-Plc Rare O Ital Gug
 52324.D.5 [nCS; ESTC: N37479]; Il
 trionfo d'Arianna (1784-2) GB-Lbl
 907.k.l.(1.) [CS: 23669; ESTC:
 T89992]; Il trionfo della costanza
 (1783-2) GB-Ob Harding D 2453 (6) [CS:
 23771; ESTC: T174292]; Il trionfo
 della costanza (1783-3) GB-Lbl
 11714b.39.(7.) [CS: 23772; ESTC:
 T68202]; Il tutor buriato (1787-2) GB-
 Lbl 907.k.l.(9.) [CS: 24149; ESTC:
 T89960]; La vestale (1776) GB-Ob
 Harding D 2448 (4) [CS: 24738; ESTC:
 T69480]; Virginia (1786-2) GB-Ob
 Dunston B 1992 (7) [CS: 24960; ESTC:
 N52705]; Zemira e Azore (1779-2) GB-
 Lbl 907X11.(8.) [CS: 25290; ESTC:
 T52923]; Zemira e Azore (1781) GB-
 Lbl 643.e.10.(7.) [CS: 25291; ESTC:
 T90615].

Marinan, Gaetano Aci e Galatea (1795/2) GB/Lbl
'painter and machinist' 907.k.4.(9.) [CS: 206; ESTC: T69490];
 Alceste (1786/2) US/AA RBR
 PR4049.B15M6 [CS: 600; ESTC: N29644];
 L'amore protetto dal cielo; o sia, La
 vestale (1787/2) GB/Lbl 907.k.l.(7.)
 [CS: 1727; ESTC: T90002]; Armida
 (1786/2) GB/Lbl 11778.aaa.18. [CS:
 2707; ESTC: T70690]; ll barbiere di
 Siviglia (1789/2) US/SM 233652 [CS:
 3748; ESTC: N43623]; Il burbero di
 buon core (1794/2) GB/Lbl 907.k.3.(4.)
 [CS: 4293; ESTC: T89957]; La cameriera
 astuta (1788/2) US/Ch TS 8092/
 642.1788 [CS: 4588; ESTC: N72292]; Il
 capriccio dramtnatico (1794/2) GB/Lbl
 907.k.4.(2.) [CS: 5063; ESTC: T70469];
 I contadini bizzarri (1794/2) GB/Lbl
 907.k.2.(2.) [nCS; ESTC: T72064]; Il
 convito (1782/2) GB/Lbl 907X18.(1.)
 [CS: 6596; ESTC: T71453]; ([dagger])
 La discordia conjugale (1792/2)
 GB-Lbl 907.k.3.(6.) [CS: 7941; ESCT:

 T89952]; Il disertore (1789-2) GB-Lbl
 1609-1604. [CS: 7973; ESTC: T121954];
 La generosita d'Alessandro (1789-2)
 GB-Lbl 1608-3714. [nCS; ESTC: T1237];
 Giannina e Bemardorne (1787-2) GB-Lbl
 907.k.l.(ll.) [CS: 11748; ESTC:
 T89950]; Giulio Cesare in Egitto
 (1787-2) GB-Lbl 1342.k.34. [CS: 12214;
 ESTC: T71450]; Giulio Sabino (1788-2)
 GB-Lbl 907.k.2.(1.) [CS: 12239; ESTC:
 T71792]; I giuochi d'Agrigento (1793-
 2) GB-Lbl 907.k.4.(4.) [CS: 12269;
 ESTC: T69506]; lfigenia in Aulide
 (1789-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.2.(5.) [CS:
 12740; ESTC: T71457]; fingiese in
 Italia (1786-2) US-PHlc O Ital Anfo
 52326.D.7 [CS: 13205; ESTC: N29096];
 La locanda (1792) GB-Lbl 907.k.3.(2.)
 [CS: 14360; ESTC: T90003]; La
 locandiera (1788) GB-Lbl
 U777.cc.l.(2.) [CS: 14375; ESTC:
 T17111]; Il matrimonio segreto (1794-
 2) GB-Lbl 907.k.6.(1.) [CS: 15241;
 ESTC: T89984]; ([dagger]) La
 molinarella
 (1791-2) US-Ch *EC75 R2727 795db [CS:
 15828; ESTC: N12471]; Le nozze di
 Dorina
 (1793-2) GB-Lbl 1342.k.25. [CS: 16729;
 ESTC: T100852]; Odenato e Zenobia
 ([1793J-2) PL-Kj Lit. ang. 280 H [nCS;
 ESTC: T230197]; L'olimpiade (1788-2)
 GB-Lbl 907.k.2.(4.) [CS: 17038; ESTC:
 T71456]; Perseo (1786) US-Wc ML50.2
 .P333 S2 Case [CS: 18551; nESTC]; Il
 re Teodoro in Venezia (1787-2) GB-Lbl
 907.k.l.(8.) [CS: 19642a; ESTC:
 T89946]; Gli schiavi per amore (1787)
 GB-Lbl 1342.k.29. [CS: 21225; ESTC:
 T100202]; Gli schiavi per amore (1788-
 2) US-Cn V. 461. 656 [CS: 21227;
 ESTC: N64045]; La scuola de'gelosi
 (1786-2) US-NHub ML50 S165 S4 [nCS;
 nESTC]; Semiramide (1794-2) GB-Lbl
 907.k.4.(6.) [CS: 21520; ESTC:
 T69503]; Semiramide (1795) I-Rb
 3.48.5.23 [CS: 21521; nESTC];
 Teodolinda (1793) GB-Lbl 907.k.4.(10.)
 [CS: 23017; ESTC: T69483]; Il tutor
 buriato (1787-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.l.(9.)
 [CS: 24149; ESTC: T89960]; La
 vendemmia (1789-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.2.(6.)
 [CS: 24511; ESTC: T71445]; La villana
 riconoscinta (1789-2) GB-Lbl
 163.g.66. [CS: 24880; ESTC: T112312];
 Virginia (1786-2) GB-Ob Dunston B 1992
 (7) [CS: 24960; ESTC: N52705]; I
 zingari in fiera (1793-2) PL-Kj Lit.
 ang. 279 II [nCS; ESTC: N53749]; I
 zingari in fiera (1794) GB-Lbl
 907.k.4.(7.) [CS: 25402; ESTC:
 T69504].

Moenick, Simon Frederic (also Il Cid (1773-1) GB-Lbl
Moeunich, Moench) painter'; 11714.aa.21.(7.) [CS: 5576; ESTC:
'pittore e designatore degli T30761]; Il Cid (1773-2) GB-Lbl
abiti'; 'painter and pattern 643.g.5.(10.) [CS: 5577; ESTC: T8507];
drawer for the dresses' Orfeo ed Euridice (1773) GB-Lbl
 907.i.14.(6.) [CS: 17437; ESTC:
 T69486]; ([dagger]) Quinto Fabio
 (1791-2) GB-Lbl 163.g.43. [CS: 19412;
 ESTC: T70232]; Sofonisba (1772) GB-Ob
 Harding D 2443 (6) [CS: 22190; ESTC:
 T193996]; Tamerlano (1773) GB-Lbl
 11725.b.23.(1.) [CS: 22832; ESTC:
 T70472].

Novosielski, Michael (usually L'albergatrice vivace (1783-2) GB-Lbl
Novecelleschi) 'Painter and 907X18.(3.) [CS: 561; ESTC: T71785];
Machinist'; 'Painter and Alina; o sia, La regina di Golconda
Inventor of the decorations' (1784-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.l.(4.) [CS: 908;
 ESTC: T89982]; L'amore contrastato;
 ossia, La molinarella (1794-2) GB-Lbl
 907.k.4.(5) [CS: 1577; ESTC: T69505];
 Il bacio (1782) US-Wc ML48 .A6 [CS:
 3629; nESTC]; Il barone di Torreforte
 (1781-2) GB-Lbl 907X17.(6.) [CS: 3806;
 ESTC: T89980]; La contadina in corte
 (1782) GB-Lbl 163.g.38 [CS: 6323;
 ESTC: T70237]; Il convito (1782-2) GB-
 Lbl 907X18.(1.) [CS: 6596; ESTC:
 T71453]; Il curioso indiscreto (1784-
 2) C-Hnu B 10245 [nCS; ESTC: N31182];
 Demofoonte (1784) C-Mm PR1269 H63 v.72
 [nCS; ESTC: T89975]; Le due gemelle
 (1784-2) GB-Lbl 907X18.(12.) [CS:
 8500; ESTC: T71459]; L'eroe cinese
 (1782-2) GB-Lbl 907X15 (10) [CS: 9206;
 ESTC: T69500]; L'eroe cinese (1782-3)
 US-Ws 205504 [nCS; ESTC: N68145];
 L'eroe cinese (1784) GB-Lbl 907.k.l
 (2) [CS: 9208; ESTC: T89953]; Ezio
 (1781) GB-Ob Harding D 2451 (5) [nCS;
 ESTC: T184306]; La frascatana (1781)
 GB-Lbl 11775.e.3.(5.) [nCS; ESTC:
 T40155]; Le gelosie villane (1784-2)
 GB-Lbl 907.k.l.(3.) [CS: 11413; ESTC:
 T89948]; Giunio Bruto (1781-2) GB-Lbl
 11714b.39.(6.) [CS: 12255; ESTC:
 T70005]; Ifigenia in Aulide (1782-2)
 GB-Lbl 907X17.(5.) [CS: 12730; ESTC:
 T89987]; Issipile (1784) I-Bc 268 [CS:
 13928; nESTC]; Orpheus and Euridice
 (1785) GB-Lbl 162.g.l7 [CS: 17454;
 ESTC: T70235]; Viramo e Tisbe (1781)
 GB-Lbl 163.g.56 [CS: 18746; ESTC:
 T70236]; Il pittor parigino (1785-2)
 GB-Lbl 1342X.26 [CS: 18833; ESTC:
 T100866]; Quinto Fabio (1782) GB-Lbl
 907X15.(11.) [CS: 19405; ESTC:
 T70010]; Ricimero (1780) F-Pn Res.
 V.S.721 [CS: 19810; nESTC]; I rivali
 delusi (178-2) GB-Lbl 907X18.(10.)
 [CS: 20021; ESTC: T71447]; La schiava
 (1784) GB-Lbl 907X18.(11.) [CS: 21188;
 ESTC: T71441]; Le serve rivali (1780)
 US-CAe Mus 589.219 [CS: 21872; nESTC];
 Lucio Silla (1783) GB-Lbl 907X18.(8.)
 [CS: 22022; ESTC: T71791]; Il trionfo
 d'Arianna (1784-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.l.(1.)
 [CS: 23669; ESTC: T89992]; Il trionfo
 della costanza (1783-2) GB-Ob Harding
 D 2453 (6) [CS: 23771; ESTC: T174292];
 Il trionfo della costanza (1783-3) GB-
 Lbl 11714.b.39.(7.) [CS: 23772; ESTC:
 T68202]; I viaggiatorifelici (1781-2)
 GB-Ob Harding D 2451 (3) [CS: 24782;
 ESTC: 1177076]; I viaggiatori felici
 (1782-1) GB-Lbl 907X17.(9.) [CS:
 24798; ESTC: T89972]; I
 viaggiatorifelici (1782-2) US-PHlc O
 Ital Anf 52324.D.4 [nCS; ESTC:
 N48663]; I viaggiatorifelici (1785)
 GB-Lbl 17715.bb.50 [CS: 24805; ESTC:
 T89970]; Zemira e Azore (1781) GB-Lbl
 643.e.10.(7.) [CS: 25291; ESTC:
 T90615].

Obelmann, {Sig.} (usually L'amore artigiano (1778) GB-Lbl
Obelman) 'sartore'; 'sartori' 907.i.16.(5.) [CS: 1563; ESTC:
(with Richter) T89969]; L'amore soldato (1778) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.16.(9.) [CS: 1755; ESTC:
 T89978]; La clemenza di Scipione
 (1778) GB-Lbl 907.i.16.(4.) [CS: 5670;
 ESTC: T89961]; Creso (1777-2) GB-Lbl
 907.i.15.(7.) [CS: 6906; ESTC:
 T69509]; Le due contesse (1777) GB-
 Lbl 841.b.33.(4.) [CS: 8461; ESTC:
 T56489]; Enfile, regina di Zacinto
 (1777-2) GB-Lbl 1342.m.4. [CS: 9090;
 ESTC: T89967]; La marchesa giardiniera
 (1775) EIRE-Dn LO 8683 [CS: 14726;
 ESTC: T172681]; Orione (1777) US-NHub
 ML48 L698 v.10 no.5 [nCS; ESTC:
 N42151]; Il re pastare (1778) GB-Lbl
 907.i.16.(7.) [CS: 19623; ESTC:
 T89974]; La vera costanza (1778) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.16.(6.) [CS: 24605; ESTC:
 T89997]; Vittorina (1777) GB-Lbl
 907.i.16.(3.) [CS: 25150; ESTC:
 T89968].

Rebecca, [Biagio?] Il marchese Tulipano (1786-2) D-Mbs
'painter and machinist' Fiche L.eleg.m. 3780 [CS: 14747;
 nESTC].

Richter, (Sig.) Creso (1777-2) GB-Lbl 907.i.15.(7.)
'sartori' (with Obelmann) [CS: 6906; ESTC: T69509]; Le due
 contesse (1777) GB-Lbl 841b.33.(4.)
 [CS: 8461; ESTC: T56489]; Orione
 (1777) US-NHub ML48 L698 v.10 no.5
 [nCS; ESTC: N42151].

Rizzi, Marco L'Idaspe fedele (1710-1) GB-Ob Vet. A4
'senes painted by..' e.832 (2) [CS: 12643; ESTC: N7663];
 L'Idaspe fedele (1712) GB-Lbl
 639.d.l7.(1.) [CS: 12644; ESTC:
 T36971].

Sestini, Vincenzio the Act e Galatea (1795-2) GB-Lbl
dresses by'; 'tailor, and 907.k.4.(9.) [CS: 206; ESTC: T69490];
inventor of the dresses' Alceste (1795-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.3.(8.)
 [nCS; ESTC: T89945]; L'amore
 contrastato; ossia, La molinarella
 (1794-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.4.(5.) [CS:
 1577; ESTC: T69505]; Andromaca (1790-
 2) GB-Lbl 162.g.5. [CS: 1919; ESTC:
 T71123]; Il barbiere di Siviglia
 (1789-2) US-SM1233652 [CS: 3748; ESTC:
 N43623]; Il burbero di buon core
 (1794-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.3.(4.) [CS:
 4293; ESTC: T89957]; 11 capriccio
 drammatico (1794-2) GB-Lbl
 907.k.4.(2.) [CS: 5063; ESTC: T70469];
 I contadini bizzarri (1794-2) GB-Lbl
 907.k.2.(2.) [nCS; ESTC: T72064]; Il
 disertore (1789-2) GB-Lbl 1609-1604.
 [CS: 7973; ESTC: T121954]; I due
 castellani burlati (1790-2) GB-Lbl
 163.g.36. [CS: 8445; ESTC: T99083]; La
 generosita d'Alessandro (1789-2) GB-
 Lbl 1608-3714. [nCS; ESTC: T1237]; La
 generosita d'Alessandro (1790) GB-Lbl
 907.k.2.(3.) [CS: 11501; ESTC:
 T72073]; I giuochi d'Agrigento (1793-
 2) GB-Lbl 907.k.4.(4.) [CS: 12269;
 ESTC: T69506]; Ifigenia in Aulide
 (1789-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.2.(5.) [CS:
 12740; ESTC: T71457]; Il matrimonio
 segreto (1794-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.6.(1.)
 [CS: 15241; ESTC: T89984]; Ninetta; o,
 Chi dell'altrvi si veste presto si
 spoglia (1790-2) GB-Lbl 1342.k.3. [CS:
 16481; ESTO T102937]; Le nozze di
 Dorina (1793-2) GB-Lbl 1342.k.25. [CS:
 16729; ESTC: T100852]; Odenato e
 Zenobia ([1793-2) PL-Kj Lit. ang. 280
 H [nCS; ESTC: T230197]; Orpheus and
 Euridice (1785) GB-Lbl 162.g.17. [CS:
 17454; ESTC: T70235]; Il pittor
 parigino (1785-2) GB-Lbl 1342.k.26.
 [CS: 18833; ESTC: T100866]; Semiramide
 (1794-2) GB-Lbl 907.k4.(6.) [CS:
 21520; ESTC: T69503]; Semiramide
 (1795) I-Rb 3.48.5.23. [CS: 21521;
 nESTC]; Teodolinda (1793) GB-Lbl
 907.k.4.(10.) [CS: 23017; ESTC:
 T69483]; L'usurpator innocente (1790)
 GB-Lbl 162.g.31. [CS: 24290; ESTC:
 T81109]; La vendemmia (1789-2) GB-
 Lbl 907.k.2.(6.) [CS: 24511; ESTC:
 T71445]; I viaggiatorifelici (1785)
 GB-Lbl 17715.bb.50. [CS: 24805; ESTC:
 T89970]; La villana riconoscinta
 (1789-2) GB-Lbl 163.g.66. [CS: 24880;
 ESTC: TT12312]; La villanella rapita
 (1790-2) GB-Lbl 907.k.3.(1.) [CS:
 24916; ESTC: T90004]; I zingari in
 fiera (1793-2) PL-Kj Lit. ang. 279 II
 [nCS; ESTC: N53749]; I zingari in
 fiera (1794) GB-Lbl 907.k.4.(7.) [CS:
 25402; ESTC: T69504].

Tresham, Henry 'dresses ([dagger]) Armida (1791) GB-Lbl
executed from original 11778.C.3. [CS: 2710; ESTC: T70691].
drawings by'

Waldre, Vincent L'amore artigiano (1778) GB-Lbl
'pittore, e machinista' 907.i.16.(5.) [CS: 1563; ESTC:
 T89969]; L'amore soldato (1778) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.16.(9.) [CS: 1755; ESTC:
 T89978]; Creso (1777-2) GB-Lbl
 907.i.15.(7.) [CS: 6906; ESTC:
 T69509]; Le due contesse (1777) GB-
 Lbl 841b.33.(4.) [CS: 8461; ESTC:
 T56489]; Erifile, regina di Zacinto
 (1777-2) GB-Lbl 1342.m.4. [CS: 9090;
 ESTC: T89967]; Il re pastore (1778)
 GB-Lbl 907.i.16.(7.) [CS: 19623; ESTC:
 T89974]; La vera costanza (1778) GB-
 Lbl 907.i.16.(6.) [CS: 24605; ESTC:
 T89997]; Vittorina (1777) GB-Lbl
 907.i.16.(3.) [CS: 25150; ESTC:
 T89968].

(1) Not included in Rosenfeld and Croft-Murray.

(2) BDA 3: 40, suggests that he arrived in 1768.

(3) BDA 9: 383 suggests that he did not start to work at the King's
Theatre until the 1775-1776 season.

(4) BDA 10: 270 suggests that he did not start work at the King's
until 1773.

(5) Rosenfeld "Novosielski" and Baugh are among those who give his
arrival at the King's Theatre as 1781. BDA 11: 79 gives the arrival
as being for the 1780-81 season, but omits the relevant 1780
librettos from his list of works.

(6) BDA 11: 87 gives 'fl.' from 1776.


Works Cited

In the case of the librettos, the citation is followed by the RISM library sigla and press mark of the copy consulted, followed by square brackets which contain the relevant CS and ESTC numbers. The CS number is that of Sartori; nCS indicates that that edition of the libretto is not listed by Sartori. The ESTC number is that given to the libretto by the English Short Title Catalogue, online at the British Library; nESTC indicates that that edition of the libretto is not listed in the ESTC.

Addison, Joseph. The Spectator. 8 vols. London: Jacob and Richard Tonson, 1757.

Andrei, Antonio. Quinto Fabio. London: H. Reynell, 1791. GB-Lbl 163.g.43 [CS: 19412; ESTC: T70232].

Anon, Il Barone di Torreforte. London: E. Cox, 1781. GB-Lbl 907.i.17.(6.) [CS: 3806; ESTC: T89980].

--. Description of the allegory, painted for the curtain of the King's Theatre, Pantheon. London: T. Bensley, 1791.

--. Gli stravaganti; o sia, i matrimonian alia moda. London: W. Griffin, 1766. GB-Lbl 11775.e.3.(3.) [CS: 22684; ESTC: T48732].

--. Mitridate. London: E. Cox, 1781. GB-Lbl 907.i.15.(9.) [CS: 15661; ESTC: T70007].

--. Ricimero. London: R. Ayre, 1780. F-Pn Res. V. S. 721 [CS: 19810; nESTC].

Badini, Carlo Francesco. L'Inglese in Italia. London: J. Almon, 1786. US-PHlc O Ital Anfo 52326.D.7 [CS: 13205; ESTC: N29096].

Baugh, Christopher. "Novosielski". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2004 ed. 41: 230-31.

Boswell, James. A view of the Edinburgh theatre during the summer season, 1759. London: A. Morley, 1760.

Bottarelli, Giovan Gualberto. La locanda. London: H. Reynell, 1791. US-Ch TS 8392.502.1791 [nCS; ESTC: N72291].

--.La mollinarella. London: H. Reynell, 1791. US-Ch *EC75 R2727 795db [CS: 15828; ESTC: N12471].

--. Tamerlano. London: W. Griffin, 1773. GB-Lbl U725.b.23.(1.) [CS: 22832; ESTC: T70472].

Burden, Michael. "Integrating dance; an early 'reform' opera on the London stage". The British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Annual Conference, January 2011, St. Hugh's College, Oxford. Lecture.

--. "Adapting Phaeton; Quinault's 'role' in reform opera on the London stage." The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Annual Conference, March 2011, Vancouver. Address. At http://ora.ouls.ox.ac.uk. Web.

Burden, Michael, and Christopher Chowrimootoo. The Italian Opera Aria on the London Stage 1709-1801. 2 vols. Forthcoming.

--. "A movable feast: the aria in the Italian libretto in London before 1800." Eighteenth-Century Music 4:2 (2007): 285-89.

Burrows, Donald, and Rosemary Dunhill. Music and theatre in Handel's world. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002.

Calzabigi, Ranieri de. Orpheus and Euridice. London: J. Jarvis, 1785. GB-Lbl 162.g.17 [CS: 17454; ESTC: T70235].

Chiari, Pietro. Le serve rivali. London: W. Mackintosh, 1780. US-CAe Mus 589.219 [CS: 21872; nESTC].

Coltellini, Marco. La contessina. London: G. Corrall, 1774. GB-Lbl 162.g.19 [CS: 6478; ESTC: T71124].

--. Piramo e Tisbe. London: E. Cox, 1781. GB-Lbl 163.g.56 [CS: 18746; ESTC: T70236]. Croft-Murray, Edward. Decorative Painting in England II. London: Country Life, 1970.

--. "The Painted Hall in Heidegger's House at Richmond". The Burlington 78 (1941): 1:105-12; II: 155-59.

De la Cour, William. "Mr De la Cour to the Public". Edinburgh Courant, 5 March 1763.

Dean, Winton, and John Merrill Knapp. Handel's operas, 1704-1726. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1987.

De Gamerra, Giovanni. Armida. London: Stuart and Stevenson, 1786. GB-Lbl 11778.aaa.18 [CS: 2707; ESTC: T70690].

--.Armida. London: H. Reynell, 1791. GB-Lbl 11778.C.3 [CS: 2710; ESTC: T70691].

--. Verseo. London: T. Cadell, 1774.

D'Auberval, M. Amphion and Thalia; or, Amphion, the pupil of the muses. London: H. Reynell; 1791.

--. Telemachus. London: H. Reynell; 1791.

ESTC. English Short Title Catalogue. British Library. Web.

Fiske, Roger. English theatre music in the eighteenth century. London: Oxford UP, 1973.

Grimaldi, Niccolino (attrib.). L'Idaspe fedele. London: Jacob Tonson, 1710. GB-Lbl 639.d.17.(l.) [CS: 12644; ESTC: T36971].

--. L'Idaspe fedele. London: Jacob Tonson, 1712. GB-Lbl 639.d.17.(1.) [CS: 12644; ESTC: T36971].

Highfill, Philip H, Kalman A. Burnim, and Edward A. Langhans, A Biographical Dictionary of Actors, Actresses, Musicians, Dancers, Managers and other stage personnel in London, 1660-1800. 16 vols. Carbondale, Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 1973-93.

Hume, Robert D. "The Economics of Culture in London, 1660-1740". Huntington Library Quarterly 69A (2006): 487-533.

Lindgren, Lowell. "The staging of Handel's operas in London". Handel: tercentenary collection. Ed. Stanley Sadie and Anthony Hicks. Ann Arbor: UMI Research P, 1987. 93-119.

Lorenzi, Giovanni Battista. La discordia conjugale. London: H. Reynell, 1792. GB-Lbl 907.k.3.(6.) [CS: 7941; ESCT: T89952].

Mancini, Francesco. L'Idaspe fedele. London: Jacob Tonson, 1710. GB-Ob Vet. A4 e.832 (2) [CS: 12643; ESTC: N7663].

Metastasio, Pietro. Antigono. London: R. Rapley, 1774. GB-Lbl RB.23.a.8558 [nCS; ESTC: T224722].

--. Demetrio (as Alceste). London: J. Almon, 1786. US-AA RBR PR4049.B15M6 [CS: 600; ESTC: N29644].

--.Nitteti. London: T. Cadell, 1774. GB-Lbl 907.I.14 (7) [CS: 16570; ESTC: T69501].

--. Semiramide riconosciuta. London: G. Woodfall, 1748. GB-Lbl 907.i.6.(4.) [CS: 21560; ESTC: T69496].

Milhous, Judith. "Painters and Paint at the Pantheon Opera, 1790-1792". Theatre Research International 24.1 (1999): 54-70.

Milhous, Judith, Gabriella Dideriksen, and Robert D. Hume. Italian Opera in Late Eighteenth-Century London II: The Pantheon Opera and Its Aftermath 1789-1795. Oxford: Clarendon P, 2001.

Moretti, Ferdinando. Idalide. London: H. Reynell, 1791, GB-Lbl 907.k.4.(1.) [CS: 12631; ESTC: T55177].

Morselli, Adriano. Pirro e Demetrio. London: J. Tonson, 1716. US-Ws PR1259 06 B3 v.5 Cage [CS: 18803; ESTC: N19783].

Olsen, Kirstin. Daily life in 18th-century England. Westport, Conn: Greenwood P, 1999.

Price, Curtis A., Judith Milhous, and Robert D. Hume. Italian Opera in Late Eighteenth-Century London I: The King's Theatre, Haymarket 1778-1791. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1995.

RISM. RISM Library Sigla. RISM Zentraldaktion, 2009. Web.

Rolli, Pietro. Aristodemo, tiranno di Cuma. London: [NP], 1744. GB-Lbl 907.i.4.(11.) [CS: 2656; ESTC: 69039].

--. Busiri overo in van sifugge amore. London: J. Crichley, 1740. GB-Lbl 907.i.3.(8) [CS: 4297; ETSC: T89957].

--. Numitore. London: Thomas Wood, 1720. GB-Ob Harding D 2442 (2) [CS: 16812; ESTC: T43211].

--. Rosalinda. London: [NP], 1744. GB-Lbl 907.i.4.(8.) [CS: 20146; ESTC: T69041].

--. Rossane. London: [NP], 1747. GB-Lbl 90715.(10.) [CS: 20210; ESTC: T45238].

Rosenfeld, Sybil. Georgian scene painters and scene painting. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1981.

--. "A Lupino collection of costume designs". Theatre Notebook 30.2 (1976): 58-60.

--. "Novosielski". New Grove Dictionary of Opera. Ed. Stanley Sadie. 4 vols. London: MacMillan, 1992. 3: 630.

--. "Scene painters at the London theatres in the 18th century". Theatre Notebook 20.3 (1966): 113-18.

Rosenfeld, Sybil, and Edward Croft-Murray. "A checklist of scene painters working in Great Britain and Ireland in the 18th century". Theatre Notebook 19.1 (1964): 6-20; 19.2 (1964): 49-64; 19.3 (1965): 102-13; 19.4 (1965): 133-45.

Sartori, Claudio. I librettos italiani a stampa dalle origini al 1800: catalogo analitico. 7 vols. Cuneo: Bertola & Locatelli, 1990-94.

Scouten, Arthur H. The London Stage 1729-1747. The London Stage 1660-1800, 3:3. Carbondale, 111: Southern Illinois UP, 1962.

Vanneschi, Franceso. Annibale in Capua. London: G. Woodfall, 1746. GB-Lbl 639.d.22.(6.) [CS: 2041; ESTC: T21899].

--. Bellerofonte. London: G. Woodfall, 1747. GB-Lbl 90715.(8) [CS: 3927; ESTC: T21511].

--. Vetante. London: G. Woodfall, 1747. GB-Lbl 639.d.22.(7.) [CS: 10112; ESTC: T35492].

--. Mitridate. London: G. Woodfall, 1747. GB-Lbl 90715.(7.) [CS: 15655; ESTC: T39540],

Vertue, George. Anecdotes of painting in England; with some account of the principal artists; and incidental notes on other arts. Ed. Horace Walpole. 2 vols. London: J. Dodsley, 2/1782.

Whistler, Catherine. "Venetian Painters in Britain". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. 61 vols. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 56: 247-52.

Zini, Saverio. La bella pescatrice. London: H. Reynell, 1791. GB-Lbl 163.g.55. [CS: 3900; ESTC: T90000].

--. La pastorella nobile. London: H. Reynell, 1791. GB-Lbl 163.g.53 [CS: 18171; ESTC: T89999].

Notes

(1) For the activities of scene painters, see Rosenfeld "Scene Painters" and Georgian scene painters.

(2) Annual Inflation Rates in the United States 1775-2010, and United Kingdom, 1265-2009, Measuring worth.com, Web, accessed 5 April 2010.

(3) This rise caused some controversy, although this appears to have related to the division of the extra money, rather than the rise itself: see Price, Milhous, and Hume 140-41.

(4) See Vertue 3, 268-69, for the Rizzi/Ricci spelling, and other contemporary details.

(5) For one account of this period, see John Merrill Knapp in Dean and Knapp 14050; for another, Fiske 31-51.

(6) Born in Naples, Nicolini had appeared in all the major Italian opera centres, and had arrived in London in 1708. He made his debut at the King's Theatre in a version of Alessandro Scarlatti's Pirro e Demetrio, and enjoyed a great personal success. The lion can be found satirised in Addison, 1.13 (15 March 1711): 68-73.

(7) Rosenfeld ("Scene painters" 114) lists him appearing in 1735-36, but cites no evidence in support of this inclusion.

(8) "As I have received the payment of [sets for Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Newcastle] only by benefits, the managers, instead of being losers, must have considerably gained, because they were always such nights as the charges of the house could not be otherwise cleared" (De la Cour).

(9) Between 1744 and this season, the opera house, like most of the theatres in London, was operating erratically during the crisis precipitated by the Jacobite Rebellion (Scouten 1179).

(10) "'T wou'd be impossible for Words to express the deep Sense I retain, of my very great Obligations to You (Ladies) for the Countenance you have so graciously bestowed on my Endeavours to entertain you this Winter, at the King's Theatre in the Haymarket ... this being the last Opera I shall bring on this Season." AN. JOLLI. 7 March 1748. In [Preface] "To the Ladies". Semiramide. By Metastasio.

(11) In 1976, these were in the private collections of Mrs R. I. Young, Miss P. Butler, Mr L. Lambourne, and Mr Archer, with six of them being held by the Birmingham Art Gallery; see Rosenfeld "A Lupino collection".

(12) For details of sources and accounts of the Pantheon opera scenes, see Milhous.

Michael Burden is director of New Chamber Opera, Professor of Opera Studies at Oxford University, and Fellow in Music at New College, where he is also Dean. His research is on the stage music of Henry Purcell and on aspects of dance and theatre in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. His published work includes a catalogue of Metastasio's operas as performed in London, an edition of he Ballet de la Nuit: Rothschild B1/16/6 with Jennifer Thorp, and a forthcoming biographical account of Regina Mingotti's years in London. He is currently completing a book on the staging of opera in London 1660 to 1860, is on the editorial committees of the collected Stradella and Eccles editions, and is President of the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies.
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