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Squiring salmon upstream.

The following is a true fish story. Thanks to three timber companies, the Craig Ranger District of the Tongass saved taxpayers as much as $100,000 and at the same time built a 165-foot fishway-fish ladder and flume-bypassing a 15-foot waterfall on Dog Salmon Creek. Now salmon and steelhead anglers have a dramatically improved opportunity to come up with some good fish stories of their own.

The private-sector partners contributed all equipment, labor, explosives, transportation, and incidental support for the job. The Forest Service coordinated the project and did the engineering work. In addition, the construction work required precise timing so that it began after late-departing fingerlings had made their exit and ended before the adult salmon returned to spawn.

When biologist Dan Garcia opened the gate, thousands of salmon waiting at the bottom of the falls began to swim up through the new fishway. And anglers began working on generating some fish stories.
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Title Annotation:Focus: Partners for the Land; construction of fishway on Dog Salmon Creek, Alaska
Author:McIntosh, Paul
Publication:American Forests
Date:Nov 1, 1990
Words:154
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