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Species of adult Odonata from three natural areas in Mississippi.

Mississippi was quoted recently as one of the most under-surveyed states for Odonata (Donnelly, 2002). Published updates of species distribution or even point-location data are necessary for official documentation of biodiversity and to provide a baseline for setting conservation priorities. Furthermore, published species lists serve as a reference tool for persons involved with biological inventory. A comprehensive update of Odonata species and county records in Mississippi, complete with state-wide distribution maps, is planned for release within a few years (S. Krotzer, pers. comm.). In the mean-time, this article presents a compilation of collected or sight records from three locations sampled during the 2003-04 flight seasons: Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge (NNWR), Strawberry Plains Audubon Center (SPAC), and Tombigbee National Forest (TNF). Managers at these locations requested and were promised lists of Odonata species, thus this article will help facilitate the fulfillment of that promise.

The NNWR and TNF are adjacent and spread over four counties in east-central Mississippi. The Noxubee River flows through both areas and supports numerous beaver impoundments. These wetlands are typically less than a meter deep and dominated by soft rush (Juncus effusus), bur-reed (Sparganium americanum), and tag alder (Alnus serrulata). Other lentic sources of odonates in these areas include bottomland swamps, reservoir lakes, and ponds.

The SPAC is a 2,500 acre former plantation near Holly Springs in northern Mississippi. This mixed woodland and fallow pasture landscape is interspersed with farm ponds, moist-soil wetlands, and a Nuphar dominated beaver impoundment. Much of the fallow open space is under fire restoration to warm-grass prairie.

Most of the following records were taken from research outings to wetlands, so the lists are weak on lotic breeders, and because most surveys occurred at project sites that I sampled mostly in summer, the coverage is incomplete and the lists really represent a minimum species set for each natural area. In addition, records are based on adults, without exuviae or nymph collections to truly determine residency. Therefore, the possibility exists that at least some species were in transit from a natal site beyond the natural area's boundary.

These species lists were generated during ecological research on wetland-breeding Odonata. Details of some projects and survey methods are given in Bried (2005) and more will become available in forthcoming publications (e.g., Bried and Ervin, 2005).

Altogether, 77 species were caught or seen across all natural areas in 2003-04. This total is nearly 60% of the odonates currently known to occur in Mississippi (Abbott, 2005). Most records include collected specimens of at least one adult; the sight-only records are marked with an asterisk (*). Voucher specimens are stored in the Mississippi Entomological Museum of Mississippi State University.

NOXUBEE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

damselflies (Zygoptera, 18 species)

Argia apicalis, A. tibialis, Calopteryx maculata, Enallagma basidens, E. civile, E. divigans, E. geminatum, E. signatum, E. traviatum, E. vesperum, Ischnura hastata, I. kellicotti, I. posita, I. ramburii, Lestes australis, L. inaequalis, L. rectangularis, L. vigilax

dragonflies (Anisoptera, 40 species)

Anax junius, Aphylla williamsoni, Arigomphus maxwelli, Celithemis elisa, C. eponina, C. fasciata, Cordulegaster obliqua, Coryphaeschna ingens*, Dromogomphus spinosus, D. spoliatus, Epiaeschna heroes, Epitheca cynosura, E. princeps, Erythemis simplicicolis, Erythrodiplax minuscula, Gomphaeschna furcillata, Gomphus exilis, G. lividus, Hagenius brevistylus, Ladona deplanata, Libellula cyanea, L. incesta, L. luctuosa, L. lydia, L. pulchella, L. semifasciata, L. vibrans, Macromia illinoiensis georgiana, M. taeniolata, Nasiaeschna pentacantha, Pachydiplax longipennis, Pantala flavescens, P. hymenaea, Perithemis tenera, Somatochlora linearis, Sympetrum ambiguum, Tramea carolina, T. lacerata

In addition, Dr. Lloyd Bennett of Mississippi State University captured adult specimens of the dragonflies Cordulegaster bilineata and Gomphus vastus at NNWR (species verifications made by J. Bried).

STRAWBERRY PLAINS AUDUBON CENTER

damselflies (19 species)

Argia apicalis, Calopteryx maculata, Enallagma aspersum, E. basidens, E. civile, E. daeckii, E. divigans, E. doubledayi, E. dubium, E. geminatum, E. signatum, E. vesperum, Ischnura hastata, I. posita, I. ramburii, Lestes australis, L. inaequalis, L. vigilax, Nehalennia integricollis

dragonflies (32 species)

Anax junius, A. longipes, Arigomphus villosipes, Celithemis elisa, C. eponina, C. fasciata, Epiaeschna heroes, Epitheca cynosura, E. princeps, Erythemis simplicicolis, Erythrodiplax minuscula, Gomphaeschna furcillata, Gomphus exilis, G. lividus, Ladona deplanata, Libellula auripennis, L. cyanea, L. incesta, L. luctuosa, L. lydia, L. pulchella, L. vibrans, Macromia taeniolata, Nasiaeschna pentacantha, Pachydiplax longipennis, Pantala flavescens, P. hymenaea, Perithemis tenera, Sympetrum ambiguum, S. vicinum, Tramea carolina, T. lacerata

Several additional species were found nearby around Chewalla Lake in Holly Springs National Forest, including the damselflies Argia fumipennis, A. tibialis, Chromagrion conditum, and Nehalennia gracilis. To my knowledge, the only previous Mississippi record of N. gracilis is given in Westfall and May (1996). There are no county records of this species in Mississippi (Donnelly, 2004), nor is it currently listed in the Odonata Central database (see Abbott, 2005).

TOMBIGBEE NATIONAL FOREST

damselflies (18 species)

Argia apicalis, A. fumipennis, A. tibialis, Calopteryx maculata, Enallagma daeckii, E. divigans, E. dubium, E. geminatum, E. signatum, Ischnura hastata, I. kellicotti, I. posita, I. prognata, I. ramburii, Lestes forficula, L. inaequalis, L. vigilax, Nehalennia integricollis

dragonflies (36 species)

Anax junius, Aphylla williamsoni, Boyeria vinosa*, Celithemis eponina, C. fasciata, C. verna, Cordulegaster erronea*, Coryphaeschna ingens*, Dromogomphus spinosus, Epiaeschna heroes, Epitheca cynosura, E. princeps, Erythemis simplicicolis, Erythrodiplax minuscula, Gomphaeschna furcillata, Gomphus exilis, Ladona deplanata, Libellula cyanea, L. flavida, L. incesta, L. luctuosa, L. lydia, L. pulchella, L. semifasciata, L. vibrans, Macromia illinoiensis georgiana, M. taeniolata, Nasiaeschna pentacantha, Pachydiplax longipennis, Pantala flavescens, Perithemis tenera, Progomphus obscurus, Sympetrum vicinum, Tachopteryx thoreyi*, Tramea carolina, T. lacerata

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Thanks to Madge Lindsay (SPAC), Henry Sansing/Larry Williams (NNWR), and Kim Bittle (TNF) for permission to conduct the research. Thanks also to Lloyd Bennett for sharing his Odonata faunistic information. An anonymous reviewer provided helpful comments on an earlier draft of this article. This research was supported by funding from the US Geological Survey Water Resources Research Institute to Gary N. Ervin (Mississippi State University, Department of Biological Sciences), grant #01HQGR0088, and a Society of Wetland Scientists Student Research Grant to Jason T. Bried.

LITERATURE CITED

Abbott, J.C. 2005. OdonataCentral: An online resource for the Odonata of North America. Austin, Texas. Available at http://www.odonatacentral.com. (Accessed: March 23, 2005).

Bried, J.T. 2005. Community and conservation ecology of dragonfly and damselfly adults in Mississippi wetlands. M.S. Thesis. Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, USA.

Bried, J.T., and G.N. Ervin. 2005. Distribution of adult Odonata among localized wetlands in east-central Mississippi. Southeastern Naturalist, in press.

Donnelly, N. 2002. Dot map project--patterns of diversity are emerging. Argia 14(2):13-16.

Donnelly, N.W. 2004. Distribution of North American Odonata, Part III: Calopterygidae, Lestidae, Coenagrionidae, Protoneuridae, Platystictidae. Bulletin of American Odonatology 8:33-99.

Westfall, M.J., Jr., and M.L. May. 1996. Damselflies of North America. Scientific Publishers, Gainesville, Florida.

Jason T. Bried (1)

Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762

(1) jasonbried@hotmail.com; Current Address: The Nature Conservancy, Eastern New York Chapter, 200 Broadway, Suite 301, Troy, NY 12180
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Author:Bried, Jason T.
Publication:Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences
Geographic Code:1U6MS
Date:Oct 1, 2005
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