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Sony's wireless server FSV-PGX1. (The Pulse 2).

You'll be tempted to tuck the FSV-PGXl into your coat pocket as you leave the office, since it looks a lot like a PDA or Pocket PC, but if you do, you may well stuff up your boss' plans for an evening of high level meetings with the lawyers. That's because the FSV-PGX1 is, in fact, a wireless handheld file server from Sony -- not an electronic diary at all. Stick it in the middle of a meeting table, have everyone sit around it with their laptops, and the FSV-PGXl will act as a file distributor -- kind of like a blackjack dealer -- tossing out the files to anyone who needs to take a peek. There's a 20-GB internal hard disk for storage, and it uses the IEEE 802.1lb (Wi-Fi) standard for file transfer at speeds of up to 11 Mbps. Shunning your regular Windows OS flavors, the PGX1 runs on the Linux 2.4.20 operating system but can, of course, route any file system from any computer OS. There's a back-up battery, effectively providing UPS capability if the power goes down via the AC adapter, and a neat little cradle with built-in Ethernet for sale separately. Open price, but approximately [Yen]70,000. To be released in Japan on March 29.

More info: www.sony.jp
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Title Annotation:from Sony Corp.
Publication:Japan Inc.
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:9JAPA
Date:Apr 1, 2003
Words:217
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