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Social stress as an indicator of crime: evaluating the spatial distribution of crime using proximate locations at the block level.

SOCIAL STRESS AS AN INDICATOR OF CRIME: EVALUATING THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF CRIME USING PROXIMATE LOCATIONS AT THE BLOCK LEVEL. LJ MORGAN, PHYSICAL AND EARTH SCIENCES, JACKSONVILLE STATE UNIVERSITY, JACKSONVILLE, ALABAMA 36265. JESSICA ROSS, 6313 WINFREY PLACE, MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 36117

It is hypothesized that areas of higher crime are directly related to the spatial arrangement of socially stressed neighborhoods at the micro or block level of aggregation. Of particular concern is that crime and stress, though mildly correlated when considering crime and stress within the same localized spatial area, indicate stronger relationships at varying distances from the associated block. It is also suggested that higher stress levels using the Localized Index of Social Stress (LISS) will manifest in stronger correlations with crime at greater distances and that these correlations will peak and then dissipate with the effect of distance decay. Five characteristics of stress have been identified as areas of lower income, non-white populations, higher numbers of children per household, and female heads of households with no husband present (Bronnimann 2008). Using the data that was collected at the individual household level, we were able to find that these five variables are directly associated with stress and levels of stress making up part of the social hierarchy.

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Title Annotation:Anthropology Paper Abstracts
Author:Morgan, L.J.; Ross, Jessica
Publication:Journal of the Alabama Academy of Science
Article Type:Book review
Date:Apr 1, 2015
Words:207
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