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Social housing is back in Ontario.

TORONTO -- Social housing is back in Ontario! For the first time in a decade the provincial and federal governments have taken steps to develop a sizeable number of new affordable housing. More than 2,300 new affordable housing units will be created in Ontario municipalities supported by the $56 million under the Canada-Ontario Affordable Housing Program.

Prime Minister Paul Martin told community activists in Montreal that the federal Liberal election platform will include a five-year plan to fund affordable housing, a departure from a decade of government policy.

The funding in Ontario includes $41.8 million for 26 pilot projects located in eight municipalities; $13.2 million allocated for affordable housing in four municipalities; and $1.0 million for the repair and renovation of housing in northern Ontario.

The Canada-Ontario Affordable Housing Agreement is a five-year commitment that combines $245 million in Government of Canada funding with matching contributions from the Government of Ontario, municipalities and other private and non-profit partners.

The federal allocations under the Canada-Ontario agreement include: (amount, number of units, city, sponsor, etc)

* $1.43 million, 53-unit project in Toronto, Newtonbrook United Church and the Taiwanese United Church of Toronto Non-Profit Homes Corporation, for lower income senior citizens, families with children, and single persons, approximately 40 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $7 million, 264-unit project in Toronto, BG Schickedanz for lower income senior citizens, families with children, and single persons.

* $837,000, 31-unit project in Toronto Bellwoods Centre, for disabled persons. All of the tenants will pay rent geared to income.

* $5.2 million for a 193-unit project in Toronto, Medallion Property Incorporated for lower income senior citizens, families with children, and single persons. Approximately 40 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $729,000, 27-unit project in Toronto, St. Clare's Multifaith Housing Society for disabled persons. All of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $216,000 for an 8-unit project in Toronto.sponsored by Urban Habitat. The units will be occupied by families and single persons.

* $324,000, 12-unit project in Toronto, Aykler and Co. The units will be occupied by lower income single persons.

* $6.2 million, a 232-unit project in Toronto. Verdiroc, for lower income families with children, and single persons. Approximately 25 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $2.2 million, 83-unit project in Toronto, Remington for lower income families with children, and single persons.

* $2.43 million, 90-unit project in London, Homes Unlimited for lower income tenants. Approximately, 50 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $324,000, 12-unit project London, Affordable Housing Foundation, for lower income families. All of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $1.62 million, 60-unit project in Vaughan sponsored by the municipal non-profit organization of the Regional Municipality of York, for lower income senior citizens; approximately 40 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to income.

* $1.56 million, 58-unit project in Newmarket, the municipal non-profit organization of the Regional Municipality of York, for lower income seniors. Approximately 90 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $918,000, 34-unit project in Hamilton, Hamilton Housing Corporation, for lower income senior citizens and single persons. Approximately 50 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $702,000, 26-unit project, Hamilton, St. Elizabeth Homes, for lower income senior citizens, all of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $189,000, 7-unit project in Guelph, Guelph Unit 344 of the Army, Navy and Air Force in Canada, Matrix Affordable Homes for the Disadvantaged Inc, for lower income senior citizens and single persons. Approximately 30 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $891,000, 33-unit project in Guelph, the municipal non-profit organization of the City of Guelph, for lower income tenants. Approximately 50 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $270,000, 10-unit project in Arthur, Matrix Affordable Homes for the Disadvantaged Inc. for lower income tenants. Approximately 50 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $1 million, 44-unit project in Guelph, non-profit organization 805395 Ontario Ltd. for lower income tenants. Approximately 50 per cent of the tenants will pay rent geared to their income.

* $1.3 million, 50-unit project in Peterborough sponsored by the municipal non-profit organization of the City of Peterborough. The units will be occupied by lower income tenants."

* $110,000, 6-unit project in Kingston, Elizabeth Fry Society for lower income families and single persons.

* $347,000, 14-unit project in Kingston Home Base Housing for lower income single persons.

* $1.4 million, 85 units of a 110-unit project in Kingston, P. Martin Construction, and the units for lower income families.

* $1 million, 136-unit project in Mississauga, municipal non-profit organization of Peel Region for lower income senior citizens.

* $408,000, 48-unit project in Mississauga, municipal non-profit organization of Peel Region, for lower income single persons.

* $2.9 million, 200-unit project in Brampton, municipal non-profit organization of Peel Region, for lower income senior citizens and single persons.

Allocation to cities:

* $3.78 million, to the City of Windsor for the construction of up to 140 units of affordable housing.

* $4.05 million to the Region of Niagara for the construction of up to 150 units of affordable housing.

* $2.7 million to the City of Brantford for the construction of up to 100 units of affordable housing.

* $2.7 million to the City of Stratford for the construction of up to 100 units of affordable housing.

Affordable Housing Remote Allocation

* $1 million to the Frontiers Foundation, for the renovation, rehabilitation or replacement of housing in Northern Ontario. 416-325-1657
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Publication:Community Action
Date:Mar 15, 2004
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