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Slaves of the Shah; new elites of Safavid Iran.

1860647219

Slaves of the Shah; new elites of Safavid Iran.

Babaie, Sussan et al.

I.B. Tauris & Co.

2004

218 pages

$65.00

Hardcover

Library of Middle East history; v.3

DS292

Babaie (Islamic art history, U. of Michigan), Kathryn Babayan (Iranian history and culture, U. of Michican), Ina Baghdiantz-McCabe (Armenian history, Tufts U.), and Massumeh Farhad (curator of Islamic art, Smithsonian Institution) examine the royal household slave system of the Safavid culture in Iran 1501-1722, focusing on the first half of the 17th century. Rather than attempting a history of the organization of slavery during the period, they highlight cases that typify the agency of slaves and encapsulate the potentialities of their status. Distributed in the US by Palgrave Macmillan.

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Publication:Reference & Research Book News
Article Type:Book Review
Date:Nov 1, 2005
Words:128
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