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Serial transaminases avoid biopsy in renal transplant patients with hepatitis C.

Serial transaminase measurements provide a noninvasive means of estimating the severity of hepatitis C virus infection in infected renal transplant recipients and make liver biopsy unnecessary, according to researchers at the University of Istanbul, Turkey.

Assessment of the relationship between serial serum transaminase levels and liver disease in 82 renal allograft recipients with HCV showed that among patients with persistently normal transaminase values, liver biopsy revealed normal or minimal changes in 10, chronic persistent hepatitis C virus in 2, and chronic active hepatitis in 1. Intermittently abnormal serum transaminase values correlated with normal or minimal changes in 9 patients, chronic persistent hepatitis in 5 patients, chronic active hepatitis in 3 patients, and cirrhosis in 1 patient.

While HCV infection with persistently normal serum transaminases indicated a good prognosis with relation to liver disease, the researchers said that intermittently or continuously elevated levels do not always imply advanced liver disease. (Clinical Transplantation 2000;14:529-532.)
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Publication:Transplant News
Date:Dec 29, 2000
Words:154
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