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Seminar in advanced rheumatology: selected proceedings of a live symposium held March, 2008 bulletin of the NYU hospital for joint diseases.

Supported by educational grants from: Amgen & Wyeth Pharmaceuticals; Bristol-Myers Squibb; Centocor, Inc.; Genentech/Biogen IDEC; Roche Laboratories

Target Audience

This program is intended for physicians and allied healthcare professionals in the fields of rheumatology, orthopedics and internal medicine.

Statement of Need

New therapies are available for rheumatoid arthritis (e.g., TNF blockers. Additional therapeutic strategies (e.g., new approaches to TNF blockade, IL-6-targeted therapy) appear poised to be introduced in the foreseeable future. There is a need for physicians to understand the proper use of the newer treatments, particularly when used in combination with existing disease modifying treatments. Fibromyalgia is a common and frequently debilitating disease. To date, therapy for fibromyalgia has been off-label and largely empirically-based. Recently the FDA approved the first drug for fibromyalgia. There is a need for physicians to understand the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia as well as the best practices for treating the condition, including the use of pregabalin vs older, off-label therapies. Osteoarthritis afflicts approximately 40 million Americans, but currently available therapies are analgesic and/or palliative. New insights into the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis raise the possibility of developing disease-modifying agents. Physicians treating OA patients need to know the best current practices for OA therapy, and recognize the implications of current research on future therapies. The pathophysiology and recommended treatments for childhood arthritides differ from those for adult patients, and new treatments for pediatric arthritides are available whose use may differ from their use in adult populations. Rheumatologists treating children with arthritis need to be knowledgeable about both well-established and newly-available therapies. Skin involvement in lupus presents with a wide range of potential findings, but since rheumatologists are not formally trained in dermatology, they may not always recognize the rashes of lupus or know the best treatments for these conditions. Giant cell arteritis is a form of vasculitis that carries a risk of disastrous outcomes including blindness. While steroids are effective in many patients, some patients respond poorly or fail to tolerate the treatment. For these patients, there is a strong need for better insights into, and approaches for, vasculitis management.

Educational Objectives

* recognize the new therapies available for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and develop individualized treatment plans to ameliorate symptoms, improve joint function and slow disease progression;

* distinguish between the currently available therapies for fibromyalgia, and based on best-practice data, develop decision making protocols for optimizing therapy for individual patients;

* apply knowledge of osteoarthritis pathophysiology and therapeutic best-practices to develop treatment plans that provide optimum benefit with minimal risk to specific patients;

* recognize the indications and contraindications for both established and newer therapies available for the treatment of pediatric arthritis, and develop a treatment plan for the safe, appropriate and effective treatment of pediatric arthritis patients;

* identify specific rash types on lupus patients, and treat and monitor appropriately with the most effective medications;

* identify patients who are failing or are likely to fail conventional therapy for giant cell arteritis, and institute appropriate alternative treatments.

Accreditation Statement

The NYU Post-Graduate Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation Statement

The NYU Post-Graduate Medical School designates this educational activity for a maximum of 7 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Method of Participation

To receive up to 7 CME credits, read this supplement, which should take 7 hours of your time, complete the post-test with a minimum passing grade of 70%, complete the evaluation, and submit to the NYU Post-Graduate Medical School (instructions enclosed).

This activity is valid for credit from October 15, 2008 through October 14, 2009.

Faculty Credentials

Steven B. Abramson, MD

Professor of Medicine and Pathology

NYU School of Medicine

New York, NY

Clifton Bingham, MD

Professor of Medicine

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Baltimore, MD

Lindsey Criswell, MD

Professor of Medicine

University of California San Francisco

San Francisco, CA

Gary Hoffman, MD

Professor of Medicine

Cleveland Clinic Foundation

Cleveland, OH

Stephen Honig, MD

Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine

NYU School of Medicine

New York, NY

David Hunter, MD

Professor of Medicine

Boston University School of Medicine

Boston, MA

Michael Lockshin, MD

Professor of Medicine

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

New York, NY

Philip Mease, MD

Clinical Professor of Medicine

University of Washington School of Medicine

Seattle, WA

Michael H. Pillinger, MD

Associate Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology

NYU School of Medicine

New York, NY

Theodore Pincus, MD

Clinical Professor of Medicine

NYU School of Medicine

New York, NY

James Tumlin, MD

Associate Professor of Medicine

Emory University Medical School

Charlotte, NC

John Varga, MD

Professor of Medicine

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Chicago, IL

Joan von Feldt, MD

Associate Professor of Medicine

University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, PA

Yusuf Yazici, MD

Assistant Professor of Medicine

NYU School of Medicine

New York, NY

Disclosure Statement

The NYU Post-Graduate Medical School adheres to ACCME Essential Areas and policies, including the Standards for Commercial Support, regarding industry support of continuing medical education. In order to resolve any identified conflicts of interest, disclosure information is provided during the planning process to ensure resolution of any identified conflicts. Disclosure of faculty and commercial relationships as well as the discussion of unlabeled or unapproved use of any drug, device, or procedure by the faculty is listed below.

Steven B. Abramson, MD, serves as a consultant to Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp., Merck & Co., Inc., Pfizer, Inc., Schering-Plough, CombinatoRx, and Amgen.

Clifton O. Bingham, III, MD, serves as a consultant to Abbott Laboratories, Amgen, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp., Merck & Co., Genentech, Targeted Genetics, and NiCox. He is the recipient of research funding from Genentech and Wyeth Pharmaceuticals. He is also the recipient of educational grant support from Abbott Laboratories, Amgen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Genentech, and Centocor, Inc.

Lindsey Criswell, MD, MPH, has no financial relationships to disclose.

Gary S. Hoffman, MD, has no financial relationships to disclose.

Stephen Honig, MD, serves on the speakers' bureau of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.

David Hunter, MBBS, MSc, PhD, is the recipient of research funding from DonJoy, Inc., Pfizer, Inc., Merck & Co., Inc., AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, and Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

Michael Lockshin, MD, has no financial relationships to disclose. Dr. Lockshin's presentation will include discussion of the unlabeled or unapproved use of a drug, device, or procedure; i.e., rituximab, heparin.

Philip Mease, MD, serves as a consultant to Amgen, Abbott Laboratories, Biogen IDEC, Centocor, Genentech, Roche Laboratories, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, and UCB, Inc. He also serves on the speakers' bureau of Amgen, Abbott Laboratories, Biogen IDEC, Centocor, Genentech, and Wyeth Pharmaceuticals. In addition, Dr. Mease is the recipient of research funding from Amgen, Abbott Laboratories, Biogen IDEC, Centocor, Genentech, Roche Laboratories, and Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

Michael Pillinger, MD, has no financial relationships to disclose.

Theodore Pincus, MD, serves as a consultant to UCB, Inc., Bristol-Myers Squibb and Abbott Laboratories. He is a recipient of research funding from Bristol-Myers Squibb and Amgen.

James A. Tumlin, MD, serves as a consultant to FlowMedica Corp., GE Healthcare, Genentech, Ineos Corporation. He is a recipient of research funding from FlowMedica Corp., GE Healthcare, Genentech, Abbott Pharmaceuticals, and Ineos Corporation.

John Varga, MD, is the recipient of research funding from Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. Dr. Varga's presentation will include discussion of the unlabeled or unapproved use of a product; i.e, imatinib mesylate.

Joan Von Feldt, MD, serves as a consultant to Genentech/ Biogen IDEC and Amgen. Dr. Von Feldt's presentation will include discussion of the unlabeled or unapproved use of a drug, device or procedure; i.e., hydroxychloroquine and rituximab.

Yusuf Yazici, MD, serves as a consultant to Roche Laboratories, Celgene, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., and Centocor, and serves on the speakers' bureau of Pfizer, Inc. and Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.

The independent reviewer of this activity has no financial relationships to disclose.
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Publication:Bulletin of the NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Sep 1, 2008
Words:1297
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