Printer Friendly

Science education.

Chair: Howard Walkers, University of Southern Mississippi

Vicechair: Willie R. Heard, University of Southern Mississippi

THURSDAY MORNING

Atlantic Room

8:30 Special Joint Session with the Science Education Division Held in the Emerald Room

Introduction; Howard D. Walters and Roy J. Duhe, J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, Biloxi, MS 39530, and University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39216

8:45 STRUCTURE VISUALIZATION IN BIOCHEMISTRY EDUCATION: SEEING IS BELIEVING

Robert Bateman, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 39406

With the advent of powerful desktop and laptop personal computers has come a wealth of computational tools that can aid in the understanding of chemical and biochemical concepts. This talk will survey several of the free structure visualization software packages that are currently used in biochemistry instruction. The emphasis will be on the most effective uses of these tools both inside and outside the lecture classroom.

9:30 RESEARCH PROBLEMS CONDUCTED BY SECONDARY STUDENTS

Betsy A. Sullivan, Mississippi Museum of Natural Science, Jackson, MS 39202

The Mississippi Junior Academy of Science (MJAS) is sponsored by the Mississippi Academy of Science. Each year, the MJAS conducts a research paper competition at which secondary students submit reports on their research agendas. Students submitting research must compile their work into a specific written guideline. The competition has three phases: (1) Written Paper, (2) Oral Presentation, and (3) Overall Competition. The overall winner, second place winner and honorable mention of the Overall Competition go on to represent Mississippi at the American Junior Academy of Science (AJAS). The 2002 winning papers will be presented during this session.

9:45 QUANTITATIVE TANK AND FISH INVENTORY

Kenny [Shell.sup.*], Sara Pelleteri, and Rick Kastner, Cooperative Internship Program, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College-Jackson County Campus, Gautier, MS 39553, and J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, The University of Southern Mississippi, Biloxi, MS 39530

The purpose of the Fish and Tank Inventory Project was to quantify the aquatic stock at the J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium in Biloxi, Mississippi. Data collected for each tank included (1) the common name of each species, (2) the scientific name and family, (3) the total count in each tank, and (4) the tank capacity, salinity and estimated biomass. Aquarists, educators, and administrators will use this information to best allocate and plan new marine education programs.

10:00 SOUTHEAST REGIONAL AQUATIC NUISANCE SPECIES EDUCATION AND OUTREACH NETWORK

Howard D. Walters, J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, Biloxi, MS 39530

In 2000, the author and colleagues at Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama, and the University of Florida were funded through EPA, the National Sea Grant College and Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant to implement a series of workshops for middle and high school classroom teachers incorporating population ecology concepts and principals with the latest research for Aquatic Nuisance Species and invasive organisms. This effort has been expanded to include the southeast region of the US. Current funding includes 17 additional formal workshops for elementary, middle, and high school teachers and informal education leadership. Additionally, funding will support 57 informal, school-based workshops and three research and curriculum publications over the next two years. This presentation will address results of the first year's effort, methods and materials from the workshops, and address issues related to needs assessment for similar education and outreach efforts on ANS topics in this country.

10:15 Break

10:30 AN INFORMATIVE VIDEO GUIDE ON THE PLANT AND ANIMAL CELL ALONG WITH AN INSTRUCTIONAL PORTION ABOUT THE MICROSCOPE

[Jonathan J. Balentine.sup.*], L. Hollis Melton, and Doug Mansfield, Cooperative Internship Program, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College-Jackson County Campus, Gautier, MS 39553, and J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, The University of Southern Mississippi, Biloxi, MS 39530

An updated form of an instructional video on the proper usage of the microscope was needed for students absent during the class in which the instruction was given. Also needed was an updated version of an informative segment guiding the students through the plan and animal cell lab for Honors Biology. A script was created along with a storyboard for the video. The video was filmed and edited at the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College-Jackson County Campus.

10:45 PROJECT MARINE DISCOVERY: MISSION MANATEE

Jennifer Hale, J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, Biloxi, MS 39530

The Scott Aquarium has recently begun offering exciting and educational field trips to Crystal River, FL. During these excursions, students are introduced to the importance and aesthetics of freshwater spring ecosystems. Because the springs flow at a constant temperature, the Florida manatee finds refuge in these springs during the cold winter months. The Florida manatee is among many marine mammals that are endangered. Students are afforded the opportunity to experience first-hand these graceful and massive animals that may very well become extinct during their lifetime. In addition to this once in a lifetime encounter with manatees, students also have the opportunity to see wildlife up close and personal. The freshwater spring systems are abundant with numerous species of flora, fish and fowl not found in our immediate areas. Please join us for information on how your school can become involved in PMD: Mission Manatee. It is an experience you will never forget.

11:00 COMPUTER FACILITATED EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN IN THE HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE LABORATORY: A COOPERATIVE PROJECT BETWEEN MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND STONE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Clayton [Cowart.sup.*] and Sarah Tingle, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, Perkinston, MS 39573, and The Mississippi Space Grant Consortium, University, MS 38677

The high school science laboratory is an ideal place to introduce the use of the computer in performing real time computer facilitated experiments. The ubiquitous presence of computers makes students in this age group more computer literate than older age groups. To capitalize on this computer literacy, the project partners a student from the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College with the Stone County High School science program. The goal of the project is to implement an experimental series utilizing the application of computer interfaces and sensors in the high school science classroom. Methodology includes set-up of classrooms for the use of hardware, a series of on-site instruction and familiarization modules for the high school science teachers with software application, and the resourcing of hands-on experimental activities for the high school teachers and their students using Vernier LoggerPro software and LabPro interfaces and sensors.

11:15 INTRODUCTION OF GROUP LEARNING ACTIVITIES IN A CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY COURSE

Mary F. Lux, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 39406

Introduction of group activities into a structured, traditional lecture course may represent a shift in style for both the instructor and student. Clinical microbiology, a senior-level professional course in the baccalaureate medical technology program at the University of Southern Mississippi, has been taught with a traditional lecture format. The course presentation format was altered to include various group learning activities such as short inclass group discussions and writing assignments. Group evaluation activities included quizzes as well as group efforts on a portion of three major tests. As one might predict, the performance on group quizzes produced higher grades than the standard individual quiz format of previous years. Likewise, performance on the group portion of the tests was higher when compared with individual efforts from previous years. The group interaction allowed students to discuss and reinforce among their groups, and their response to the group activities was enthusiastic. The averag e final grades in the classes with group activities did not vary greatly from previous classes in which students worked as individuals although student satisfaction was greater in the classes with group activities.

11:30 Divisional Business Meeting

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Atlantic Room

1:30 PROJECT MARINE DISCOVERY: ON THE ROAD

Rebecca Espey, J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, Biloxi, MS 39530

The University of Southern Mississippi College of Marine Sciences invites schools in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama to bring the ocean estuaries to their students for hands-on experiences with marine life and wildlife. Instructors bring coastal animals and activities to schools to give K-12 students "up-close and personal" experience with the marine environment. During interactive sessions, students will learn about endangered and threatened sea turtles, human impacts on the environment, coastal reptiles, and the essential role wildlife has in our coastal habitats. Students and teachers take home an increased awareness and understanding of marine and aquatic environments, a more positive attitude about these fragile areas, and a renewed sense science is fun! Information will be provided on how your school can be involved with Project Marine Discovery: On the Road.

1:45 A MODEL FOR BEGINNING EDUCATION OF THE NATURAL SCIENCES AT THE PREKINDERGARTEN LEVEL

Joan [Elder.sup.*] and Martha Cooper, Mississippi Museum of Natural Science, Jackson, MS 39202

In focusing on the education of three through pre-kindergarten five-year-olds, the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science Preschool Discovery Room was designed to introduce nature in a non-threatening manner. Children are able to interact with an educator in a variety of hands-on activities which are designed to eliminate any fear of the unknown world. Multiple activities have been developed for interaction with children and have been highly successful in achieving specific goals which were developed from the preschool curriculum. The preschool curriculum was developed from the following guidelines: 1. National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), 2. Mississippi Department of Education, and 3. Mississippi Museum of Natural Science.

2:00 DEVELOPMENT OF AN ONLINE UNDERGRADUATE COURSE ABOUT EVOLUTION

Beth [Dunigan.sup.*], Karen Ng, Sheila Hendry, and Kenneth J. Curry, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 39406

An online undergraduate course about evolution was developed over an academic year by a team consisting of a professor and three students pursuing graduate degrees in Science Education. The process first entailed becoming familiar with the software, WebCT. Decisions about the intent of the course had to be made, such as goals, objectives, and target group. Then came the process of actually uploading materials to the online site for use by the students. Oral mini-lectures of the various topics of evolution were put onto a CD which was intended to be a supplement to the textbook and to substitute in part for in-class lectures. A 5-question multiple choice quiz and an asynchronous discussion on an online bulletin board were created for each chapter of the text. Included in the design were three examinations based on the discussion topics in the bulletin board. The course was taught in the summer semester of 2001.

2:15 EXECUTION OF AN ONLINE UNDERGRADU-ATE COURSE ABOUT EVOLUTION

Sheila [Hendry.sup.*], Karen Ng, Beth Dunigan, and Kenneth J. Curry, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 39406

During the summer semester of 2001, an online undergraduate course about evolution was conducted by a team consisting of a professor and three students pursuing graduate degrees in Science Education. The initial enrollment consisted of 42 undergraduate students from Mississippi and other states, including Texas and Iowa. Some students took advantage of a CD on which various aspects of the topic of evolution were discussed as oral mini-lectures. A 5-question multiple choice quiz on each chapter ensured that the chapters were read, resulting in fairly meaningful asynchronous discussions of various topics on the online bulletin board. Three examinations were given with questions based on the topics used in the asynchronous discussions. We discovered that some students paid little attention to good grammar and to proofreading their responses. The principal advantages of the course included convenience of scheduling and convenience of grading, since the software, WebCT, automatically graded the quizzes and posted the grades. Another noticeable advantage was that the writing and grammar skills of the students improved. Some of the disadvantages included a tremendous grading load, hardware and software technical problems, difficulties of timely feedback to correct misconceptions, and the uncertainty of sending responses to faceless people.

2:30 Divisional Poster Session

GULF COAST RESEARCH LABORATORY AND MISSISSIPPI ACADEMY OF SCIENCE: FIFTY-FIVE YEARS OF SCIENCE ON THE GULF COAST

Stacy [Miller.sup.*] and Joyce Shaw, Cooperative Internship Program, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College-Jackson County Campus, Gautier, MS 39553, and J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, The University of Southern Mississippi, Biloxi, MS 39530

The relationship of the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL) and the Mississippi Academy of Sciences (MAS) spans over half a century. Originally early members of MAS who worked tirelessly for its establishment conceived GCRL. From its beginning, the scientists at GCRL have contributed to MAS at many levels. Four GCRL scientists have been elected president of MAS and others have held leadership roles on the division level. This project examines the relationship between GCRL and MAS by tracking the work presented by a scientist at the MAS Annual Meeting and published in the Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences (JMAS). The abstracts written by GCRL scientists who were published in JMAS were entered into a bibliographic database. A list of GCRL scientists who have held significant positions with MAS was compiled. Other archival materials owned by Gunter Library were examined for references to GCRL and MAS interactions. Results of the project will be presented in a poster format at the 2002 MAS Annual M eeting in Biloxi, MS.

SULFA DRUGS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE HUMAN POPULATION

Merri Doretha Ellison and Anil K. [Sharma.sup.*], Mississippi Valley State University, Itta Bena, MS 38941

Sulfa drugs are a common name applied to a group of chemotherapeutic agents that are effective against a number of infectious diseases. In 1935, the German chemist, Gerhard Domagk, discovered that an azo dye, Prontosil, cured streptococcal infections in mice. The active principle in Prontosil was found to be para-aminobenzenesulfonamide, commonly known as sulfanilamide. Sulfa drugs are used to treat fungal and urinary infections, leprosy, and ulcerative colitis, but resistant strains of microorganisms (streptococci, meningococci, and shigella) have made the drug less effective. Antibiotics have largely replaced sulfa drugs in the treatment of bacterial infections. This research will investigate what sulfa drugs are, the pros and cons of the drug, and the studies that were done on sulfa drugs and its effects on the human population.

FRIDAY MORNING

Atlantic Room

9:00 DEVELOPMENT OF A DIGITAL ARCHIVE FOR PRESENTATION OF 35 MM SLIDES

Leslie [Flynn.sup.*], Lacey [White.sup.*], Rebecca Espey, Jennifer Hale, Jeannie Flint, and Willie R. Heard, Cooperative Internship Program, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College-Jackson County Campus, Gautier, MS 39553, and J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, The University of Southern Mississippi, Biloxi, MS 39530

This project entailed scanning and converting 35 mm slides into JPEG files on a computer. These slides are for various projects and presentations and the slides vary in age. Due to advancement in technology, slides are becoming antiquated, but the information need to be preserved. Once scanned, these images were organized by content and then authored on CD-ROM. These authored CDs will eventually be distributed to different departments or other educational facilities as a resource for teaching or formal presentations. These files saved in the highly versatile JPEG format can be used in other projects and programs, such as future use in Microsoft Power Point presentations or in a website.

9:15 DEVELOPING AN EDUCATIONAL VIDEO ON SAFETY IN THE CHEMISTRY LAB

Kari [Bloodsworth.sup.*], Steve [Manis.sup.*], and Doug [Mansfield.sup.*], Cooperative Internship Program, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College-Jackson County Campus, Gautier, MS 39553, and J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, The University of Southern Mississippi, Biloxi, MS 39530

Safety in the chemistry laboratory is a serious matter, which could prevent accidents and save lives. Many students have an unclear knowledge about safety in the laboratory; therefore, they sometimes struggle with successfully completing experiments within the allotted time frame. The purpose of this project was to produce an educational video on safety in the chemistry laboratory. This video was designed to highlight the most common safety violations in an entertaining and educational manner.

9:30 AQUATIC EROTICA: SEX IN THE SEA

Linda S. Flint, J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, Biloxi, MS 39530

A study of reproduction among aquatic and marine animals provokes natural interest and provides information on various species. A look at some mating instincts help to understand why some species become endangered or extinct because their nesting habitats are preserved.

9:45 HOW TO INCREASE MINORITY PARTICIPATION IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING IN SIX WEEKS

Sharon [Walker.sup.*] and Willie R. Heard, J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, Biloxi, MS 39530

The Secretary of the Navy Engineering and Science Residential Program was initiated in 1977 with an overarching goal of augmenting the number of students who pursue a science and/or engineering field, enhancing their content knowledge, stimulating interest in the Navy as a possible career choice, and providing these pre-college students with three hours of undergraduate, college credit. Come hear how your students can get financial assistance, scientific mentoring and college credits.

10:00 Break

10:15 TRANSFORMING A TRADITIONAL FUNGAL LABORATORY

Aimee T. [Lee.sup.*] and Alan [Niven.sup.*], University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 39406

For the last several years we have been transforming our traditional "cook-book" style laboratories in our freshman program to be more interactive, allowing the students' to engage and explore the topics more thoroughly. A traditional diversity laboratory consists of specimens arranged around the room for students to observe. Students generally perform each lab by following directions without being challenged to think. The transformations made to this freshman-level fungal laboratory are based on BSCS constructivist model: engagement, exploration, explanation, elaboration, and evaluation. We will describe the activities associated with each phase and how technology has been incorporated. We will also describe how the student-designed mini-investigation on spore dispersal, which we have recently implemented, is an application of the exploration phase. The students generate a hypothesis, make predictions, and design an experiment using fungal cultures and Rose-Bengal Chloramphenicol (RBC) agar plates. The follo wing week the students evaluate their experiment, draw conclusions and answer questions associated with the results obtained in their experiment.

10:30 BASE PAIR "SOAR"S WITH HELP FROM THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)

Robin W. Rockhold (1), S. [Bender.sup.*] (2), Tiffany Scarff (3), D. Chambliss (3), F. Allen (4), N. Fahmy4, and A. Srinivasan (4), (1.) University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39216; (2.) Jim Hill High School, Jackson, MS 39204; (3.) Teacher Resource Center, Jackson Public School District (JPSD), Jackson, MS 39206, and (4.) Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174

Base Pair, a biomedical research mentorship program that pairs high school students and teachers with research faculty from UMC, has been supported from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 1994. In 2000, Base Pair entered a collaborative effort with personnel from JPSD and faculty from Tougaloo College, that was funded under the K-12 Higher Education Partnership (KHEP) initiative from the NSF. The primary objective for the KHEP award was to establish the academic framework for creation of high school-based Student Oriented Academic Research (SOAR) laboratories that would support student inquiry-based learning and enhance achievement in science and mathematics. To this end, 19 JPSD teachers were recruited and engaged in a series of Saturday workshops on the Tougaloo campus, where focus was centered on techniques and tactics for delivering improved mathematics instruction and offering innovative science activities. Subsequently, teachers participated in an intensive four-week Summer Research Institute, in conjunction with the Base Pair summer activities on the UMC campus. Several SOAR sites are being established, the most advanced of which is in place at Jim Hill High School, where an "Outdoor (environmental) Classroom" is the focus for activities. (Sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the NSF.)

10:45 THE CUMULATIVE NATURE OF LEARNING IS ENHANCED THROUGH THE CORRELATION OF HANDS-ON SCIENCE EDUCATION TO COMPETENCIES FROM STATE SCIENCE STRUCTURE

Martha Cooper, Joan [Elder.sup.*], Betsy A. [Sullivan.sup.*], and Heather [Sullivan.sup.*], Mississippi Museum of Natural Science, Jackson, MS 39202

Formal and informal education programs at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science are designed to build on the cumulative nature of learning, the strengthening of prior knowledge and the interrelationships that occur between the learning environments of school and the Museum. Hands-on programs are correlated to competencies from the State Science Structure and help teachers meet specific classroom objectives and goals. Special programs for children three through college age help build positive attitudes toward science by giving students opportunities for exploration, manipulation, and acquisition of new information.

11:00 DEVELOPING A DOCUMENTARY OF THE COOPERATIVE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM AT MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOR PUBLIC USE

Bridget [Thompson.sup.*], L. Hollis Melton, and Doug Mansfield, Cooperative Internship Program, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College-Jackson County Campus, Gautier, MS 39553, and J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium, The University of Southern Mississippi, Biloxi, MS 39530

This project resulted in the creation of a video documenting the Cooperative Internship Project. The film covered the intern's, and the mentor's responsibilities, and shows some of the projects completed. The film includes a brief history of the program, interviews with current and past interns, and interviews with some of the mentors and instructors.

11:15 A HISTORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE GRAND BAY NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE

Lisa [Benezue.sup.*] and Jennifer Buchanan, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College-Jackson County Campus, Gautier, MS 39553, and Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve/Mississippi, Biloxi, MS 39530

The Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve was the setting for a study which analyzed land use changes within the general vicinity of the reserve during the 20th Century using both historical accounts received through one-on-one interviews with senior citizens as well as interpretation of aerial photography. The researchers identified elder members of the community who have lived most of their lives in proximity to the reserve, developed an appropriate standardized survey that was used to interview these older members of the nearby community, interviewed the seniors and documented with audio tape their historical accounts, surveyed areas near the reserve vicinity to document current land uses, and drafted land use maps in Arcview to document land use changes over time.

11:30 STUDY OF GASOLINE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY INSTRUMENT (GC)

Sabrina [Caldwell.sup.*], Mudlagii B. Goli, and William C. Mahone, Mississippi Valley State University, Itta Bena, MS 38941

There is a general feeling that higher-octane number may be good for your automobile. Keeping that in the mind, we have studied the GC profiles of various gasolines of different octane numbers (87, 89, and 93) sold in the region to find the characteristics of that gasoline. One can use those GC patterns as a fingerprint of a gas. One should be able to easily distinguish 87 from that of 89 and 93. Theoretically, one may be able to predict the GC profile of 89 brand provided 87 and 93 gases were mixed to make such a brand. In-depth report on such an analysis will be presented.
COPYRIGHT 2002 Mississippi Academy of Sciences
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2002, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:various articles on teaching science
Publication:Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jan 1, 2002
Words:3805
Previous Article:Psychology and social science.
Next Article:Zoology and entomology.
Topics:


Related Articles
Simply Speaking.
Teachers' and Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science: Instructional Implications.
Assessing teacher attitudes in teaching Science.
Implementing hands-on programs: these NSF-supported curriculum centers offer valuable online resources. (the online edge).
Do as I say, not as I do: a personal odyssey.
Getting serious about science.
Teaching boxes help streamline science lessons.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2020 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters