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Science education.

Chair: Michael Carley, USM Gulf Coast Research Laboratory

Vice-chair: Samual Clardy, USM Gulf Coast Research Laboratory

THURSDAY MORNING

Ash

O12.01

8:00 USE OF THE INTEGRATED SYSTEM APPROACH TO CONNECTING TECHNOLOGY OF THE 21ST CENTURY FOR INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM.

Prince Showi, James Ejiwale

Jackson State University

Never before have men been so close together, yet so far apart, in so many ways. This is particularly frustrating period in the history of our nation. Technology, as it affects everyone in this age of science, is a powerful force upon the pattern of our society. The unique aspect of this era is the rapidity with which knowledge becomes outdated. Our changing society and power pressures are constantly moving us to new thresh-holds. Our nation is faced with problems growing out of a rapidly increasing population, an increased and expanded industrial economy, and accelerated job changes. To provide education and training for all who need it, who seek it, and who can profit from it. To improve, as necessary, ongoing programs and develop new programs to meet the needs of people in a changing economy. To meet the challenge of projected and rapidly increasing enrollments in Technology Education.

As we complete the twentieth century and prepare for the twenty-first century, it is important to realize that our world is far different from one which existed a hundred year ago. We must try to understand how changes will originate, their probable future direction, and how to cushion our self against the shocks that might come. Since have no heritage of the future. Therefore we must, by re-examining past programs, project such a heritage and relate it to current thinking and Technological innovations.

O12.02

8:20 A VISUAL APPROACH TO REMINDING NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENTS ABOUT EXPONENTS

Harold A. Simmons, Randall Warren

Northwest Community College

Non-traditional students who have not been associated with mathematics nor science for a period of time are more likely to exhibit the most prevalent academic condition in the United States--that being "mathophobia". This is usually expressed during the math or science supposed review of how to deal with exponents and scientific notation. The following visual approach has been developed to attempt to guide these students; since, slides and\or the board may be covered, crowded, and filled with symbols and rules.

In addition and subtraction, a 'change' symbol is used to remind the student which entry was altered:

2 x 10^2-->2 x 10^2

3 x 10^3 ?--> 30 x 10^2

In multiplication and division, a 'to the whatever' platform is utilized. This is an extended line on which the exponents are assembled. For example, (-3)+(+4)

(2 x 10^-3)(3 x 10^4) = 6 x 10-----------< 'to the whatever' platform and (+4)-(-2)

(4 x 10^4) / (2 x10^-2) = 8 x 10-------------

These seemingly simple devices help clarify exponents for students who need a reminder about some of the 'ghosts of math's past'. Student response to these visual setups has been positive. The more formal rules and guides can then be introduced without as much initial apprehension.

O12.03

8:40 THE USE OF ASM "MICROBLIBRARY" RESOURCES IN TEACHING MICROBIOLOGY

Mary Lux (1), Rebecca Buxton (2)

(1) University of Southern Mississippi, (2) University of Utah

Because of the high expectations in the technology-enhanced classroom, instructors are challenged to obtain high-quality images for use in "PowerPoint" and other visual teaching and testing formats. Because of ubiquitous access to the Internet, many instructors have been eager to exchange and share classroom resources with their colleagues around the globe. MicrobeLibrary (ML) was established by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) to "... be an electronic journal of peer-reviewed educational resources for the teaching community." Materials include over 1400 learning objectives; still and animated visual resources; science and education feature articles and journal papers; review of books, videos, software and websites; and curriculum resources. We will highlight how instructors have used the ML curriculum and visual resource area in their clarromms. Increased concern and regulation for use of highly infectious organims in teaching have limited the use of many organism and ML resources have filled the gaps for continued effective presentations of a broad diversity of organisms. Although no outcomes assessments have been performed on these specific additions to our curricula, course evaluations have improved with the addition of enhanced visual technology in classrooms. The accessibility of high-quality, legally-available images has contributed to our successes. Most academic institutions recognize the peer-reviewed status of ML, which offers an opportunity for communication and publication withon the microbiology education community.

O12.04

9:00 ENHANCEMENT OF ATTITUDE IN COLLEGE BIOLOGY STUDENTS THROUGH INCREASED USE OF VISUAL INSTRUCTION

Johnny Mattox

Blue Mountain College

Today's traditional college freshmen have been reared in the modern information age, having been exposed to computers, the Internet, online communities, text messaging, and video games from an early age. It has been estimated that eighty percent of these students are mostly visual learners. Two classes of general biology students were taught using both traditional lecture and lecture incorporating PowerPoint presentations. Students were then administered a questionnaire that included questions concerning their perferential method of instruction. Eighty-one percent of the forty-two students that responded to the questionnaire indicated that they preferred instruction that included PowerPoint presentations. Ninety percent of the students responded that the use of PowerPoint had enhanced their understanding of biology and eighty-three percent responded that they felt their attitude toward biology had improved through the use of PowerPoint instruction. The results obtained from this survey seem to indicate that the use of PowerPoint instruction does have a positive effect on student attitude toward biology.

O12.05

9:20 TECHNOLOGY ASSIMILATION IN SCIENCE CLASSROOM (TASC): A NEW STANDARD FOR ENHANCED STUDENT LEARNING

Babu Patlolla (1), Josephine Posey (1), Jan Duncan (1), Leroy Johnson (1), Joyce White (2), Gayla Banks (3)

(1) Alcorn State University, (2) Jefferson School District, (3) Claiborne County School District

The Department of Biological Sciences and the Department of Education at Alcorn State University conducted a four-week (July 2-30, 2007) workshop for local middle school and high school science teachers. Eighteen in-service teachers from the local school districts participated in this program. Activities included computer applications, hands on contemporary molecular biology techniques and incorporation of varied learning styles into teaching methods. Participants also took three field trips in the state and attended seminars. As a part of program evaluation pre and post surveys were conducted by an internal and external evaluator. Two follow-up sessions are planned for the 2007-2008 academic year to discuss the incorporation of the new knowledge in their class. Participants enjoyed the field trips and were eager to share their experiences with their colleagues at their school district. (This project was funded by Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning through No Child Left Behind Summer Institute for Teachers Title II Program # 2007-073E.)

9:40 Break

O12.06

10:00 ENHANCING WEBSITE ACCESSIBILITY OF DATA GENERATED BY THE CENTRAL GULF OF MEXICO OCEAN OBSERVATION SYSTEM

Jessica A. Kastler (1), Sharon H. Walker (1), Stephan D. Howden (2)

(1) The University of Southern Mississippi-Gulf Coast Research Laboratory-J.L. Scott Marine Education Center, (2) The University of Southern Mississippi-Department of Marine Sciences

Ocean Observation Systems (OOS) are networks of data collecting stations spread throughout the world's ocean. Each station provides information concerning local oceanographic and atmospheric conditions. Used together the data can help people understand the coastal environment, improve weather forecasts, notify boaters of unsafe navigation conditions, or assist emergency responders in locating people needing help. The Central Gulf of Mexico Ocean Observation System (CenGOOS) maintains a buoy on the coast of Mississippi that transmits data onshore at 30-minute intervals. This buoy has operated since 2004, except during a two-year hiatus resulting from hurricane damage in 2005.

The CenGOOS website broadcasts data from this buoy as it becomes available. This website was examined to determine how easily it could be used by individuals with varying degrees of awareness about OOS. Modifications to improve the accessibility of these data to various stakeholders were listed. High school science teachers were selected as the user group to be targeted with the first modifications. The following modifications were implemented to enhance the website for use by teachers. Directions were written for downloading data and graphing in Microsoft Excel. Descriptions were written and posted to describe parameters measured, their significance, and the instruments that measure them on the USM buoy. Lesson plans were designed to explore the manner in which common weather events appear in time series of key parameters.

O12.07

10:20 The Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico: Catalyzing Relationships Among Scientists and Teachers to Enrich Classroom Ocean Sciences Learning

Sharon H. Walker (1), Jessica A. Kastler (1), John Dindo (2), Mike S. Spranger (3), Dan Brooks (4)

(1) The Unversity of Southern Mississippi, (2) the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, (3) the University of Florida, (4) Mississippi State University, United Kingdom

The Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico (COSEE:CGOM) is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation to The University of Southern Mississippi, Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, J.L. Scott Marine Education Center (MEC). Through this grant, the MEC participates in the nationwide COSEE network to improve ocean sciences education by providing opportunities for scientists and teachers to learn from and teach each other during field experiences. Teachers share their expertise in pedagogy, communication with diverse audiences, and classroom culture. Scientists share marine science content knowledge and the process of conducting research. These experiences occur during Weekend Workshops and Summer Institutes, which are held annually in two Gulf of Mexico states. Teachers who have participated in a Summer Institute, or similar experience elsewhere in the U.S., may embark on a Sea Scholars cruise, an advanced professional development program during which they work with surveyors aboard U.S. Navy oceanographic survey vessels focusing on physical, chemical, geological and biological oceanic processes. These processes include areas such as acoustics, bathymetry, meteorology, water quality parameters, bioluminescence, navigation, various sediment types, and Naval applications of these data. Participants work collaboratively to develop content--rich or inquiry-based lesson plans, the best of which are posted to the COSEE:CGOM website www.cosee-central-gom. This presentation will share results of COSEE:CGOM activities to date and provide information for researchers or teachers who would like to participate in future activities.

O12.08

10:40 CREATING A STATIC SHELL EXHIBIT FOR PATRONS OF THE J. L. SCOTT MARINE EDUCATION CENTER THROUGH THE CLASSIFICATION AND CATALOGING OF SPECIMENS

Diane Stopher (1), Shelia Brown (2)

(1) Cooperative Intern Program with the 1 Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College--Jackson County Campus Honors Biology Students, (2) Gulf Coast Research Laboratory-J.L. Scott Marine Education Center, (3) The national Aeronautics and Space Administration

The purpose of the project was to increase the number of static displays for the J. L. Scott Marine Education (MEC) of the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL) post-Hurricane Katrina. Shells donated to the J. L. Scott Marine Education Center (MEC) were identified, classified, and grouped based on worldwide distribution. After the shells were cataloged, they were labeled with appropriate descriptors and placed into a display case. The new exhibit will be used for viewing by visitors and as an educational teaching resource by the Research Associates of the MEC as they implement educational programs.

O12.09

11:00 SAFETY IN THE CHEMISTRY LAB: AN OUNCE OF CAREFUL PLANNING IS WORTH A POUND OF RUSHING INTO CHAOS

Vicdaly Williams (1), Steve Manis (1)

(1) Cooperative Internship Program with the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College- Jackson County Campus Honors Biology Students, (2) The National Aeronautics and Space Administration

It is very important for students participating in activities to know the safety procedures before performing any work. The intent of the Chemistry laboratory video was to educate the students on how to react to different situations that could occur in the Laboratory. Topics included in the safety video were appropriate student behavior, handling of chemicals, eye protection, proper use of Bunsen burners, and clean up procedures.

O12.10

11:20 CREATING A SAFETY VIDEO FOR MICROBIOLOGY

Mallory Hoerner (1), Janice Cooley (1)

(1) Cooperative Intern Program with the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College--Jackson County Campus Honors Biology Students, (2) The National Aeronautics and Space Administration

The purpose of this project was to create a video that focused on the importance of laboratory safety in Microbiology. The intern, with the mentor's assistance, demonstrated correct and incorrect laboratory procedures in the video. There are two volunteers that demonstrated the procedures in the video combined with complementary narration. The intern met weekly with the mentor, created an outline for the film, and received approval for all components of the video.

11:40 Business Meeting

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Ash

O12.12

1:40 THE DEVELOPMENT OF A HUMAN BODY LEARNING CENTER FOR THIRD AND FOURTH GRADE GIFTED STUDENTS

Alicia Bowman (1), Bobbie Morgan (1), Anja Comerford (1)

(1) Cooperative Intern Program with the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College--Jackson County Campus Honors Biology Students, (2) Ocean Springs School District, Magnolia Park Elementary School, (3) the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

The gifted students at Magnolia Park Elementary School participate in various self-paced learning centers. The centers require the students to research and learn more in-depth material about a specific subject. Learning centers were created to assist students in exploring the various systems of the human body. The students used hands-on, interactive activities to gain information about the human body to which they would not have access in an average third or fourth grade class. Students routinely understand and gain knowledge concerning the levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. These centers provided the students the opportunity to learn on the synthesis and evaluation levels, ultimately resulting in a more detailed knowledge of the human body and its major systems.

O12.13

2:00 THE EFFICACY OF ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGIES AND THEIR THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS FOR AMPUTEES

Demarco Pendarvis, Kelvin Reed, Nicholas Haynes, Susan A. Bender Jim Hill High School

The objectives of this project are to design and build and electronic alternative to the human forearm and hand and the therapeutic applications for amputees. We will accomplish this task by designing an original electronic arm and hand that will be connected to the pressure points and neuromuscular junctions in existing human tissues. We will discuss the results of the trials of our invention and our success in developing our novel technologies. This research is sponsored by a grant given to the University of Mississippi Medical Center awarded to the Base Pair Program from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Project Director Dr. Rob Rockhold.

2:20 Break

O12.14

2:40 THE EFFECTS OF HOMEOPATHIC REMEDIES ON THE METABOLISM OF GLUCOSE IN Gryllus assimilis AND ITS IMPLICATIONS TO THE TREATMENT OF HUMAN DIABETES

Brandon E. Hodges, Susan A. Bender

Jim Hill High School

This research project will discuss the metabolism of glucose in field crickets, Gryllus assimilis. The methods include the use of a metabolism chamber to measure the oxygen consumption of both ale and female crickets at controlled temperatures. These will serve as the control group while a second set of crickets will receive over the counter homeopathic remedies for the treatment of Diabetes mellitus. We will then measure the rates of glucose metabolism in the experimental group to determine the effectiveness of these remedies in mediating the metabolic process. We will then attempt to connect the use of glucose in invertebrates to the potential benefits of homeopathic medicines on human Diabetes mellitus. This research is sponsored by the University of Mississippi Medical Center and the Base Pair/SOAR grant funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr. Rob Rockhold project director.

O12.15

3:00 RURAL BIOMEDICAL INITIATIVE: TRANSFORMING RURAL STUDENTS INTO SCIENTIFIC SCHOLARS

Cindy Cook (1), Jeff Stokes (1), Susan A. Bender (1), R. W. Rockhold (1)

(1) Puckett Attendance Center, (2) Murrah High School, (3) Jim Hill High School, (4) University of Mississippi Medical Center

The Rural Biomedical Initiative (RBI) is an undertaking to inculcate components of Jackson Public School's programs, Base Pair and SOAR, into an emblematic rural high school science curriculum with the intent of establishing a student awareness of the infinite array of opportunities available in both medical and scientific regimes. Puckett Attendance Center in the Rankin County School District was selected as the first rural Mississippi school to implement RBI. The 2007-2008 biomedical research students chose the course from the class selection choice card based not only on interest generated from the comments of first year students, but also the course overview. During the first week of school, students were polled regarding career interests. Of the students polled, 50 % declared interest in a medical-related career, 30% in a science-related career, and 20% undecided. The students were exposed to a series of unit lectures and an array of laboratory investigations extending through four areas of focus which included Medicine and Health, Biotechnology, Forensics, and Environmental Science. Throughout each unit, student progress was recorded providing evidence that 82% of the students performed above average while only 18% performed average. Currently, 70% of the students surveyed declare interest in a medical-related career, 20% scientific-related field, and 10% undecided. RBI provides rural students an opportunity not only to experience their career interests, but also explore incalculable opportunities available in medical and scientific prefectures. (Supported by the Pre-college Science Education program of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and UMMC)

O12.16

3:20 CURRENT SCIENCE NEWS AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL CASE STUDIES TO INSPIRE STUDENT SUCCESS

Susan A. Bender

Jim Hill High School

High school and college students are becoming increasingly concerned about the emergence of new bacterial and viral threats to public health. Although many of these pathogens have been around for many years, the advent of an increasingly active media has generated a sense of panic and fear over the perceived threats associated with community acquired infections. These original case studies help student's master new skills and assimilate new content while developing a sense of self confidence. The students are able to intelligently discuss the current threats to public health without experiencing the panic associated with those that are ignorant of science. This research is sponsored by the University of Mississippi Medical Center and the Base Pair/SOAR grant funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr. Rob Rockhold, Project Director.

O12.17

3:40 MARINE SCIENCES CAREERS EXPOSITION

Michael Carley, Shelia Brown

J.L. Scott Marine Education Center

The University of Southern Mississippi (USM) Gulf Coast Research Laboratory's (GCRL) J.L. Scott Marine Education Center (MEC) hosted a Marine Sciences Careers Exposition Day on January 19, 2008. The Exposition was held on the campus of GCRL in Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Sponsors for this program were the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources (MSDMR), USM, GCRL, MEC, Coastal Conservation Association Mississippi, and Chevron Pascagoula. During the Exposition high school students were provided the opportunity to interact with local scientists, researchers, engineers, and formal and nonformal educators from USM's Department of Coastal Sciences and Department of Marine Sciences-Stennis Space Center, the National Marine Fisheries Service, U.S. Navy, MSDMR, and other marine related agencies in both formal and informal settings. The scientists/researchers presented career testimonials, research presentations, tours of research and work facilities, and field experiences.

6:00 Dodgen Reception and Poster Session (Please set up between 4:00 and 4:30p) Location: Grand Ballroom

P12.01

A SURVEY OF THE NATURAL AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT OF THE GULF COAST RESEARCH LABORATORY

Sarah Deutsch (1), Joyce Shaw (3)

(1) Cooperative Intern Program with the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College--Jackson County Campus Honors Biology Students, (2) The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, (3) Gunter Library, Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, The University of Southern Mississippi

The Ocean Springs campus of the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, bound by the Mississippi Sound to the south and Halstead Bayou to the north, consists of approximately 35 acres of marsh, sandy shoreline, lawns, wooded areas, and the built environment. The purpose of this project is to document and review the birds, mammals, and reptiles coexisting among the humans, trees, and buildings on the campus. Activities included interviewing staff members about their knowledge of animals seen on campus, visiting Gulf Islands National Seashore Park to access information about wildlife in the Park which is directly across the bayou from the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, compiling literature about the animals and trees, and using archival documents to verify information about the built environment. The results of this project included: a listing of commonly found birds, mammals, and reptiles and an inventory of buildings including: the date of construction and architect, a listing of trees, photography documentation of physical and biological entities, and fact sheets concerning common animal species.

P12.02

FIRST STEPS IN CREATING A SEARCHABLE DIGITAL DATABASE FOR CURRENTS, THE JOURNAL OF MARINE EDUCATION

Stevie Smith (1), Sharon H. Walker (2), Johnette Bosarge (2)

(1) Cooperative Intern Program with the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College--Jackson County Campus Honors Biology Students, (2) The University of Southern Mississippi-Gulf Coast Research Laboratory-J.L. Scott Marine Education Center, (3) The National Aeronautics and Space Administration

The mission of the National Marine Educators Association (NMEA) is to make known the world of water, both fresh and salt. The NMEA has approximately 1,100 members, including formal and informal educators, media professionals, research scientists, and social scientists. Most members belong to one of NMEA's 17 regional chapters. The NMEA publishes Current, the Journal of Marine Education three to four times annually for audiences representing academia, state/federal governmental agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses/industries. The archive of Current includes paper copies of all issues published each year since 1978. Digital copies of these records were destroyed with the J.L. Scott Marine Education Center and Aquarium facility in Biloxi, Mississippi during Hurricane Katrina, in August 2005. The long term goal of this project is to develop a digital database which can be searched on the basis of author, volume/issue or year of publication, key word, or category. Articles were digitized into "pdf" files, and assigned to categories (e.g., "activity," "exemplary program," or "pedagogy"). All information was entered into a spreadsheet which will serve as the foundation for future work. Statistics describing total number of articles and number of articles per category demonstrate the development of the publication, its membership, and marine education in general through the previous 29 years.

P12.03

EDUCATIONAL CURRICULUM FOR THE BIRD EXHIBIT

Theresa Freshour (1), Makala Brown (2)

(1) Cooperative Internship Program with the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College- Jackson County Campus Honors Biology Students, (2) The Walter Anderson Museum of Art, (3) The National Aeronautics and Space Administration

A curriculum was needed to give school tours background resources in both art and science in order to maximize the educational value of the museum. A list of book resources was compiled for teacher and classroom use and a list of online resources was compiled concerning W alter Anderson, art history, and science/nature. A list of art activities for the classroom and for use at the museum was prepared. This curriculum will be provided to all school tours before and during their visits.

P12.04

SCIENCE BEYOND THE BASICS: AN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

Lane Havard (1), Julia Platt (2)

(1) Cooperative Intern Program with the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College--Jackson County Campus Honors Biology Students, (2) Oak Park Elementary Fourth Grade Class, (3) The National Aeronautics and Space Administration

The primary objective of this project was to introduce elementary-age students to the exploration of the science curriculum in an in-depth creative manner. Required topics were expanded and applied to current events and every-day fundamentals. Hands-on projects enhanced student understanding through participation in experimental experiences. Topics presented included matter, weather and atmospheric, solar systems, and climate.

P12.05

"YOUR BACKYARD" PROJECT ENGAGES COLLEGE STUDENTS IN ONLINE CLASS

Wendy Garrison

The University of Mississippi

The objective of this assignment was to challenge college students in a freshman level non-majors biology class to come up with original and simple ways to positively affect their personal environment or "backyard." Students in the Spring 2007 online BISC104 class "Inquiry Into Life, The Environment" were given a choice between two projects, with about 65% choosing to work on "Your Backyard." Methods used online for this project were peer review discussion boards, digital photography and computer generated sketches, and graphs. This poster presents six designs reflecting different student ideas and approaches to incorporating wildlife-friendly features in familiar areas. The assignment followed up on earlier class discussions on pesticide safety and exercises on making graphs. Students were required to follow specific guidelines in designing their site, creating time-lines, and documenting sources and cost estimates for materials. The imagined projects were diverse and included backyards recovering from Hurricane Katrina; sorority grounds; small individual apartment grounds; a school courtyard; a Mississippi hunt club. Because of cost and other restrictions students were asked NOT to implement the projects for the class, but many students were enthusiastic about following through at a later date, and found that they had developed a new outlook.

P12.06

SUPERHYDROPHOBIC MATERIAL MIMICS LOTUS LEAVES

Anil Sharma, Kimberly Jefferson

Mississippi Valley State University

The water droplets rest on wood that has been treated with a nanoparticular surface coating, prepared by the BASF chemical company. The coating has made the surface of the wood highly water-repellent (superhydrophobic) by decreasing the forces of adhesion between the wood and water. As a result, the contact area between water and wood is minimized, making the water droplets assume a globular form instead of wetting the wood. Superhydrophobic surfaces are self-cleaning and stay clean for a long time. The nanostructures in superhydrophobic coatings are also found in natural materials, such as the leaves of the lotus plant. Such a superhydrophobic material could potentially be applied to airplane wings (to keep them from icing up), the hulls of ships (to help them ply waters more easily), and clothing (to keep them dry).

P12.07

DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING SCIENCE LESSONS FOR A FOURTH GRADE GIFTED CLASS

LeAnn Potter (1), Shera Zimmerman (1), Adelle Register (2)

(1) Cooperative Intern Program with the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College--Jackson County Campus Honors Biology Students, (2) Pecan Park Elementary, (3) The National Aeronautics and Space Administration

As gifted students, the select fourth grade class was comprised of children whose thinking abilities were above that of their peers. The focus of this study was to research, develop, and implement science lessons for these students. Each individual study was created to meet the fifth grade Mississippi Science Frameworks by introducing information pertaining to the solar system through participation in hands-on activities. Various methods of learning were utilized to continue increasing the students' knowledge at an advanced pace.

P12.08

USING TRIANGLULAR INQUIRY LEARNING TO INCREASE TEST SCORES IN THE MISSISSIPPI DELTA

Abigail S. Newsome, Louis Hall, Mack Felton, Jr., Udai Kudikyala

Mississippi Valley State University

Triangular inquiry learning is designed to increase science test scores of students while enhancing teacher effectiveness. By combining state and national educational standards this project attempted to create a working model that could be used to exploit triangular inquiry learning methods using a hands-on approach. This project provided hands-on infusion of technology into instructional processes for teachers and students while introducing the facts of science and technology as they relate to catfish farming. By providing students and teachers experiences and year-round instructional activity, this project proposed to stimulate interest in STEM disciplines while improving student outcomes. Activities consisted of students and teachers attending a two week residential program. Students received instructions in water quality analysis collection and correlation led by participating teachers with the support of university faculty. Students were paired with teachers to perform field based laboratory experiments. Pre- and pot-test results showed a 10.88% percent increase in science knowledge with a standard deviation of 23.84. Students and faculty also developed websites using Netscape Composer 7.1. The websites can be viewed at http://nsfitest.mvsu.edu.

P12.09

THE INFLUENCE OF STUDY HABITS ON THE ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF BIOLOGY UNDERGRADUATES

Tamilselvi Gopal, Jacob C Blickenstaff, Sherry Herron

The University of Southern Mississippi

In the midst of many sophisticated electronic devices and plenty of resources, students study habits vary vastly from one to another. The study habits and time spent on task also influences the academic achievement of biology major undergraduates. This research was aimed at studying the relationship between the study habits of biology undergraduates and their grades. We defined study habits as time spent on academic activities at home in a day, week, weekend, time preference, resource used, time spent on television & internet, learning method and place of study. The study was conducted among 150 biology undergraduate students at USM. Preliminary results show that more than 87% of the students spend less than 1 hr on reading biology every day and less than 3 hrs during the week end. Also, 85% of the students use only the class notes, 85% of the students read at their residence and 60% of the students preferred individual learning method. Students were grouped according to the CGPA and their responses were correlated. This study revealed some interesting correlations between study habits and the grades (detailed results will be discussed in the poster). The study results will help the students, teachers and parents to understand the relation between the study habits and the grade. Further, suggestions for the parents and teachers will also be provided in order to motivate the students. Some ideas for future research will also be addressed.
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Publication:Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:1U6MS
Date:Jan 1, 2008
Words:4917
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