Printer Friendly

Saliva screening can help cancer diagnosis, say experts.

Summary: The hospital will provide a detailed report with personal results, genetic counselling, and valuable insights to help patients and their doctors determine the most appropriate breast and ovarian cancer prevention strategies based on risk.

Staff Reporter

The myBRCA HiRisk test screens 26 genes which may be associated with increased risk for hereditary cancer syndromes. (Supplied photo)

Genetic testing and screening through saliva can now potentially prevent breast cancer through early detection, according to health experts.

The myBRCA is a screening test to help people understand their risk for breast and ovarian cancer, and the myBCRA HiRisk test is multi-gene screening to show the risks for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer through the BRCA1 (Breast Cancer 1) and BRCA2 (Breast Cancer 2) genomes.

"One in eight women are diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime, and when diagnosed early, the survival rate goes up by 98 per cent. Statistics show that eight out of 10 breast cancer cases can be prevented if caught early, said Dr Serife Simsek, breast surgeon at Emirates Hospitals & Clinics.

Bruno Rosset, CEO and founder of Just4Me Genetics, said: "If you have a BRCA gene that is not working properly, meaning, it carries a harmful mutation, your risk of developing breast, ovarian and other cancers increase significantly. A BRCA mutation can increase the lifetime risk of breast cancer in women from 12 per cent to 80 per cent by age 80."

BRCA genes are part of the body's natural defence system and help protect from developing certain types of cancer. BRCA1 is a class of genes known as tumour suppressor genes because they normally act to restrain the growth of cells in the breast, while BRCA2 is a tumour suppressor gene that is found in all humans. However, if the BRCA genes mutate into variants, the risk of cancer rises dramatically.

The myBRCA HiRisk test screens 26 genes which may be associated with increased risk for hereditary cancer syndromes - Cowden Syndrome, Li-Fraumeni Syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome, and Lynch Syndrome. In addition, the test screens for the following cancer types - Colorectal Cancer, Endometrial Cancer, Melanoma Pancreatic Cancer, and Gastric Cancer.

The hospital will provide a detailed report with personal results, genetic counselling, and valuable insights to help patients and their doctors determine the most appropriate breast and ovarian cancer prevention strategies based on risk.

"The test will help you to understand your risk of developing breast, ovarian, and other cancer types. In addition to this, it will help identify potentially at-risk family members. By improving the odds of early detection, you can improve the potential for prevention," said Dr Serife.

asmaalizain@khaleejtimes.com

Staff Reporter

Copyright [c] 2017 Khaleej Times. All Rights Reserved. Provided by SyndiGate Media Inc. ( Syndigate.info ).

COPYRIGHT 2017 SyndiGate Media Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2017 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Khaleej Times (Dubai, United Arab Emirates)
Date:Oct 21, 2017
Words:452
Previous Article:Beit Al Khair contributes 55,000 meals across UAE.
Next Article:Residents seek medical help to shed those extra kilos.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters |