Printer Friendly

SYNERGEN AWARDED THIRD CNTF PATENT

 SYNERGEN AWARDED THIRD CNTF PATENT
 BOULDER, Colo., Aug. 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Synergen Inc.


(NASDAQ: SYGN) announced today that it has obtained U.S. patent 5,141,856 for the recombinant production of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). This is the third patent Synergen has received relating to CNTF, the first was granted in March 1991 for the human nucleic acid (DNA) sequence and the second was awarded in April 1991 for the process of purifying CNTF.
 The patent issued today by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) claims methods and materials used for producing recombinant CNTF, including recombinant production in E. coli as well as other host cells and expression vectors comprising the nucleotide sequence encoding CNTF.
 "We are extremely pleased that the U.S. PTO has recognized our pioneering neurobiology work with the issuance of our third CNTF patent," stated Jon S. Saxe, president and chief executive officer. "The three CNTF patents protect our investment in our aggressive development program. We now have an outstanding commercial foundation for the marketing of CNTF," he added.
 Synergen is developing CNTF as part of a joint venture with Syntex (U.S.A.) Inc. The Synergen patents are licensed to the Syntex- Synergen Neuroscience Joint Venture, which is developing new protein- based therapeutics for the treatment of neurological diseases.
 CNTF is being investigated by the Syntex-Synergen Neuroscience Joint Venture for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The first study in patients with ALS began in May 1992 at Tufts University Medical Center under the direction of Theodore Munsat, M.D., professor of neurology and pharmacology. Patient recruitment has already begun for a subsequent multicenter study.
 CNTF is a nerve repair factor normally produced by the body in response to damage to peripheral nerves. A lethal disease with no known treatment, ALS, commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease, causes progressive degeneration of the motor nerves. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that CNTF may be useful in preventing or slowing degeneration of the primary motor neurons that ultimately leads to death for people with ALS.
 The Syntex-Synergen Neuroscience Joint Venture was formed by the two companies in 1990. CNTF is the first compound from the joint venture to reach human clinical trials. Other proteins in development are nerve growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and a Parkinson's Factor.
 Synergen is a biopharmaceutical company engaged in the discovery, development and manufacture of protein-based pharmaceuticals. The company's research is targeted toward products to treat inflammatory diseases, wound healing and neurological diseases.
 -0- 8/25/92
 /CONTACT: Debra Bannister of Synergen, 303-938-6242/
 (SYGN) CO: Synergen Inc. ST: Colorado IN: MTC SU:


MC -- DV003 -- 3075 08/25/92 14:04 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Aug 25, 1992
Words:441
Previous Article:HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STUDENTS WHO WORKED ON METRO SYSTEM TO RECEIVE SCHOLARSHIPS, AUG. 26
Next Article:SANTA MONICA BANK DECLARES DIVIDEND
Topics:


Related Articles
SYNERGEN AND UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AWARDED BROAD PATENT FOR INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST
SYNERGEN COMPLETES BUYOUT OF R&D PARTNERSHIP
SYNERGEN APPOINTS HEADS OF CLINICAL RESEARCH AND REGULATORY AFFAIRS IN EUROPE
SYNERGEN APPOINTS VICE PRESIDENTS OF MARKETING AND SALES AND PROCESS ENGINEERING
SYNERGEN TO PRESENT ANTRIL PHASE III SEPSIS TRIAL RESULTS
SYNERGEN REPORTS MANAGEMENT CHANGES
SYNERGEN REPORTS FIRST QUARTER FINANCIAL RESULTS
SYNERGEN INC. REPORTS THIRD QUARTER FINANCIAL RESULTS
MEDTRONIC AND SYNERGEN AGREE TO DEVELOP DIRECT INFUSION OF THERAPEUTIC AGENT FOR PARKINSON'S DISEASE

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters