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STUDY SAYS AIRLINE PILOTS DIE AT YOUNGER AGE THAN GENERAL POPULATION

STUDY SAYS AIRLINE PILOTS DIE AT YOUNGER AGE THAN GENERAL POPULATION
 ARLINGTON, Va., June 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Airline pilot death rates are much higher around retirement age than those of the general population, according to a new study published in the June issue of the Flight Safety Foundation's Flight Safety Digest.
 The study, conducted by two Cyprus-based insurance experts, suggests that airline pilot death rates surge near and shortly after retirement age. Ibrahim E. Muhanna, the principal author of the study and chief executive officer of the OmniLife Overseas Insurance Co., said two data sources used for the study confirmed the trends.
 Data used for the study came from airline pilots associations in the United Kingdom, Argentina, Colombia, Switzerland, Greece, Ireland, Spain and the U.S. Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA).
 The non-U.S. data sources covered pilot deaths between the ages of 50 and 74; their average age of retirement was 56. The ALPA data covered deaths of those pilots between the ages of 60 and 80; 60 is the mandatory retirement age for U.S. pilots.
 Each group of data, when compared with general population trends, showed significant younger death rates for airline pilots. A comparison using the non-U.S. data showed that pilot death rates surged in the 55-59 age category and that the average age of death for the pilots studied was about 61. The average age of death for the general male population dying in the 50-74 age group is about 63.
 The ALPA data also indicate death rates at younger ages, with an average age at death of 67, compared to 70 for the general population. The study reports that 69 percent of pilot deaths in the ALPA data occurred in the first nine years after retirement. By comparison, the death distribution for the general population is more even, with only 45 percent of deaths in the 60-80 range occurring in the first nine years.
 Muhanna launched the preliminary study after pension fund data indicated that pilot life expectancy was lower than the general population. He asked for industry assistance during the Flight Safety Foundation's 43rd International Air Safety Seminar in Rome in 1990. Seminar participants later provided him with the data used in the study.
 Flight Safety Foundation is an international membership organization dedicated to improving flight safety. Non-profit and independent, the foundation was launched in 1945 in response to the aviation industry's need for a neutral clearinghouse to disseminate objective safety information, and for a credible and knowledgeable body that would identify threats to safety, analyze the problems and recommend practical solutions to them. Since its beginning, the foundation has acted in the public interest to produce positive influence on aviation safety. Today, the foundation provides leadership to 552 member organizations in 72 countries.
 -0- 6/15/92
 /CONTACT: Roger Rozelle, director of publications, Flight Safety Foundation, 703-522-8300/ CO: Flight Safety Foundation ST: IN: AIR SU:


KD -- DC999 -- 0275 06/15/92 15:09 EDT
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Date:Jun 15, 1992
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