Printer Friendly

STUDY: KIDS TUNE IN WHEN TEACHERS TEACH WITH TELEVISION; THIRTEEN-WNET/TEXACO TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE EXPANDS

 STUDY: KIDS TUNE IN WHEN TEACHERS TEACH WITH TELEVISION;
 THIRTEEN-WNET/TEXACO TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE EXPANDS
 NEW YORK, Oct. 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Two new studies endorse the use of television as a significant teaching tool in the nation's classrooms and confirm that how students watch is as important as what they watch.
 Both studies show that teachers view television as an extremely effective tool for teaching science and enthusiastically endorse its use in the classroom. The studies also find that students are more engaged and learn more when video is an interactive part of the lesson.
 The studies, designed and analyzed by Teachers College at Columbia University and conducted by WNET, were done to determine the impact of the Thirteen-WNET/Texaco Teacher Training Institute for Science, Television and Technology. One study evaluates the effectiveness of the 1991-92 summer Institute in the New York metropolitan area; the second is a student performance study that compares learning with and without television.
 The Institute was launched in New York in the summer of 1990 through a partnership between Thirteen-WNET and Texaco Inc. In 1991, the program expanded nationwide when Texaco and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting contributed funds to establish the National Teacher Training Institute. To date, more than 17,000 teachers in 12 states have been trained, and close to two million students are already being taught by the Institute's methods.
 The Institute brings together elementary, middle and secondary school teachers to learn hands-on, interactive methods for teaching science with Instructional Television (ITV) -- curriculum-based programming designed by and for educators.
 Master teachers train participants how to record and use short video segments to elicit student participation, reinforcing active rather than passive viewing habits. Video is never used alone as an entertainment device, but rather as an integral part of a lesson, serving to stimulate discussion and motivate students.
 At a press conference today, WNET, Texaco and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting announced the Institute's expansion to ten additional sites around the nation, which will extend the total number of teachers trained to at least 30,000 in 21 states. For the first time, Institute workshops also will be made available nationwide via satellite.
 The first study, the Institute evaluation, involved 250 elementary, middle and secondary school teachers, and their students, from a broad cross section of schools in the New York metropolitan area. All the teachers had received two days of intensive training in teaching with television and technology during the 1991-92 Institute.
 Key findings include:
 -- Students learn more and show higher interest when ITV is part of the lesson;
 -- Students retain more science information when they learn it from instructional video;
 -- Science instructional programming is effective with students of both low ability and high ability; and
 -- Students give high marks to video learning, with more than two-thirds reporting that television helps them understand science better and makes it easier and more interesting for them to learn.
 Further supporting these conclusions are the results of the second study, an intensive six-week classroom comparison of student performance.
 In the student performance study, three pairs of eighth grade classrooms were closely observed at three different schools in the New York metropolitan area. Each pair of classes was taught by the same teacher. Standardized testing scores confirmed that significant differences in intelligence or achievement levels did not exist between classes in each pair. One class was taught science using the interactive ITV approach, while the control class was taught the same material without benefit of video.
 "This research represents an initial effort to document the learning benefits of ITV in the classroom," explained Ruth Ann Burns, vice president and director of the Educational Resources Center at Thirteen-WNET. "The kids exposed to ITV showed four times more improvement than the control group on test scores," she noted.
 "Additionally, the more class-time in which ITV was used, the greater the student learning. ITV students also scored higher on less tangible indicators," she continued. "Their writing was more creative and descriptive, they displayed more ingenuity and innovation on assignments, and they were more confident and enthusiastic in class. These results demonstrate the value of repeating the study with a larger sample and over longer periods of time."
 In the 1992-93 school year, the National Teacher Training Institute will double in size. With continued funding from Texaco and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Thirteen-WNET will train local public television stations and educators to implement teacher training workshops in ten cities: Phoenix, Ariz. (ASSET/KAET); Atlanta, Ga. (Georgia PTV/Dept. of Education); Carbondale, Ill. (WSIU/WUSI); Las Vegas, Nev. (KLVX); Plattsburgh, N.Y. (WCFE); Fargo, N.D. (Prairie Public Television); Portland, Ore. (Oregon Public Broadcasting), Nashville, Tenn. (WDCN); Austin, Texas (KLRU); and Salt Lake City, Utah (Utah Education Network).
 In announcing the expanded sites, James W. Kinnear, president and chief executive officer of Texaco Inc., said: "I am convinced that this is one of the most important initiatives taking place in education reform today. The Teacher Training Institute is a terrific example of the power of partnerships in education. We are proud to be involved with a group of experts who are clearly improving the critical thinking skills of students throughout the nation. With the help of innovative programs like this, I believe we have a real chance of meeting the goal of having American children be first in the world in science and math by the turn of the century."
 During the 1991-92 school year, the Institute trained teachers in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Louisiana, California, South Carolina, Ohio, Florida, Missouri, Texas, Wisconsin and Washington.
 "The Institute is based on the premise that the individual teacher should be the agent of educational change," explained Henry R. Kravis, chairman of Thirteen-WNET's board of trustees. "The two-day workshops are designed and led by a corps of master teachers, and the participants return to their schools with the mission of sharing the Institute's methodology with their peers. We know the word is spreading by the increased number of teachers who want to attend and sites interested in hosting an Institute."
 Beginning in the spring of 1993, workshops also will be made available to teachers for the first time through the Satellite Educational Resources Consortium (SERC), a 23-state partnership of educators and public broadcasters providing courses to any school district with satellite downlink capability. Through SERC, the Institute will present three two-hour live and interactive workshops to science teachers, media and computer specialists, and curriculum coordinators, who will be able to communicate directly via telephone with the master teachers leading the sessions.
 "The Teacher Training Institute really works," said Richard Carlson, president and chief executive officer of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. "And so does SERC. The six-hour satellite course on the SERC system will extend the training to thousands of teachers who have not had access to the Institute. We hope that in the very near future, all teachers in America will be introduced to this vital training."
 -0- 10/26/92
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: Ruth Ann Burns is executive director of the National Teacher Training Institute; Sarah Feldman is national project manager of the National Teacher Training Institute; Cindy Johanson is manager of the National Training Institute in New York. Gary Natriello, Associate Professor, Sociology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, designed the research instruments and protocols for both the survey and the classroom evaluation and analyzed the survey data. Pam Newman Pooley, a media education consultant and educational video instructor in the Department of Communication, Computing and Technology at Teachers College, further analyzed the data and wrote the survey report./
 /CONTACT: Kathryn Perry, 212-560-3026, or Peg Calandrin, 212-560-2915, both of Thirteen-WNET; or Anita M. Larsen, 914-253-4155, David J. Dickson, 914-253-4128, or Maria Mike-Mayer, 914-253-4150, all of Texaco/ CO: Texaco Inc.; Thirteen-WNET; Corporation for Public Broadcasting ST: New York IN: SU:


GK -- NY086 -- 4902 10/26/92 14:25 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 26, 1992
Words:1309
Previous Article:GRAND CASINOS, INC. DECLARED 10 PERCENT STOCK DIVIDEND
Next Article:FREMONT GENERAL CORP. ANNOUNCES THIRD QUARTER EARNINGS
Topics:


Related Articles
THIRTEEN/WNET IN NEW YORK HONORS TEXACO WITH GOLDEN APPLE AWARD FOR ITS PIONEERING EDUCATIONAL COMMITMENT
TEACHERS ACT TO MAKE AMERICAN STUDENTS FIRST IN SCIENCE AND MATH THIRTEEN/TEXACO NATIONAL TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTE AUG. 3-6 IN NEW YORK
LOCAL TEACHER WINS NATIONAL AWARD FOR TEACHING WITH TELEVISION AND TECHNOLOGY
Partnership To Bring Vital New Resource To New York State Teachers.
2008 Teaching & Learning Celebration to Draw National Audience.
Bringing the World to Classrooms, the Celebration of Teaching & Learning Unveils New Web Site for 2009 and Opens for Registration.
Ernst & Young and Cyberchase Make Fun Math and Problem-Solving Activities Available to the General Public.
Public Television Inspires Teachers to Ignite the Love of Learning.
The Celebration of Teaching & Learning Commemorates Fifth Anniversary, Continuing Conversation With More Educators Than Ever.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters