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STRIPED BASS POPULATION TO GET BOOST FROM DELMARVA POWER HATCHERY

 STRIPED BASS POPULATION TO GET BOOST FROM DELMARVA POWER HATCHERY
 WILMINGTON, Del., April 22 /PRNewswire/ -- The striped bass population in the Delaware River will receive a healthy boost this year from a hatchery that is being built by Delmarva Power (NYSE: DEW) at its Edge Moor Power Plant.
 The fish will be spawned and raised in 30 tanks ranging in size from 50 to 10,000 gallons. Initial plans call for the raising of about 20,000 striped bass this year, with a long-range goal of around 100,000 fish within the next three years.
 The project also involves the use of recycled material. Grain silo rings were used to build the tanks, which were placed on a foundation of cement-stabilized coal ash from the power plant. Treated sewage sludge will be used as fertilizer for shrubbery around the tanks.
 About 50 Delmarva Power employees are volunteering their time to construct the hatchery. A consultant will provide the workers with technical assistance on hatchery operations and maintenance. The Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife will offer its expertise when the time arrives for releasing the fish into the Delaware River.
 Pollution in the Delaware River over the years had destroyed much of the spawning grounds of the striped bass, also known as rockfish. "Now that the water quality in the Delaware River has improved, we are beginning to see signs of increased natural production," said Bruce McClenathan, Edge Moor plant manager. "If successful, the hatchery will speed this recovery."
 The Edge Moor hatchery is similar to a rockfish brooding pond built on the grounds of the company's Vienna, Md., power plant in 1985. The Vienna hatchery has raised and released more than 105,000 rockfish over the last seven years. Today, more than 20 percent of the rockfish in the Nanticoke River were raised in the company's brooding pond, according to local ecological studies.
 Delmarva Power's interest in improving striped bass production began about 16 years ago when it funded research studies on striped bass.
 Both fish hatchery projects are part of the company's environmental stewardship program, "Serving & Conserving Delmarva," which is designed to provide reliable service to customers while protecting the environment of the Delmarva Peninsula.
 /delval/
 -0- 4/22/92
 /CONTACT: Wallace C. Judd Jr. of Delmarva Power, 302-429-3595/
 (DEW) CO: Delmarva Power and Light Company ST: Delaware, Maryland IN: SU:


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Date:Apr 22, 1992
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