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STATEWIDE UNEMPLOYMENT JUMPS SHARPLY IN JULY

 OLYMPIA, Wash., Aug. 31 /PRNewswire/ -- The delayed filing of unemployment claims caused Washington's jobless rate to soar from 7.3 percent to 8.2 percent in July marking the largest increase for the month on record, Employment Security Commissioner Vernon E. Stoner announced today.
 "The normal pattern in July is no change," explained Stoner. "However, this month the maximum weekly benefit increased from $273 to $340, which prompted many unemployed workers to delay filing until after the start of the new benefit year. Although the filings exaggerated the increase in July, it is now clear the economy has been weakening over the last few months."
 The unusually large increase pushed the seasonally adjusted rate from 7.7 to 8.6 percent in July -- the highest in seven years and nearly two percentage points above the national average of 6.8 percent.
 Nonfarm wage and salary employment fell seasonally by 28,200 workers and agriculture employment dropped fractionally. Both were normal for the period with most of the change reflecting an end to the school year in both public (-33,700) and private (-4,100) education. The balance of the economy gained 9,600 jobs. Construction increased by 3,700 -- the best showing for July in two years. Much of the upsurge was in high-profile commercial and industrial building. Wholesale and retail trade showed a 2,200-worker pickup with the strongest sectors being eating and drinking places (+900), apparel (+300), and general merchandise (+500).
 Services other than education were up 1,900 workers in July. This sector enjoyed the usual seasonal boost in tourist activity with amusements and recreation (+900) and hotels and lodging places (+400) both adding staff. Additionally, a 600 worker increase in business services was countered by a loss of 600 jobs in health services over the month as hospitals trimmed costs.
 Basic manufacturing fell by 1,600 during the month, according to Dennis Fusco, chief economist for the department.
 "The aircraft and parts industry continued to scale back by 1,000 workers and a lull between harvests temporarily pulled down food processing 1,000," said Fusco. "However, pulp and paper manufacturing gained 300 and petroleum and plastic products increased 200. The lumber and wood products industry was flat"
 Over the year, Washington's nonfarm wage and salary employment was up 15,800 workers. The slide in manufacturing (-10,900) has been led predominately by ongoing retrenchment in aircraft and parts (-9,100). Net new job growth has come principally in the areas of trade (+8,500) and services (+15,100). Local government (including K-12 education) added 8,300 workers over the past 12 months. State government has been flat and federal payrolls are off 3,100 workers.
 WASHINGTON STATE EMPLOYMENT SECURITY DEPARTMENT
 RESIDENT LABOR FORCE AND EMPLOYMENT IN WASHINGTON
 STATE AND LABOR FORCE MARKET AREAS
 (Not Seasonally Adjusted)
 JULY 1993 PRELIMINARY (a)
 Unemploy- Unemp.
 Labor Force Employment ment Rate
 Washington State Total 2,651,300 2,434,900 216,400 8.2
 Bellingham MSA 74,700 68,900 5,800 7.8
 Bremerton MSA 87,800 81,000 6,800 7.7
 Olympia MSA 88,500 81,700 6,800 7.7
 Seattle PMSA 1,159,800 1,077,800 82,000 7.1
 King County (b) 896,200 833,200 63,000 7.0
 Snohomish County (b) 263,500 244,600 18,900 7.2
 Spokane MSA 182,500 170,400 12,100 6.6
 Tacoma PMSA 264,800 240,800 24,000 9.1
 Tri-Cities MSA 85,100 76,900 8,200 9.6
 Benton County (b) 64,500 59,100 5,400 8.4
 Franklin County (b) 20,700 17,900 2,800 13.5
 Vancouver PMSA 140,000 129,700 10,300 7.4
 Yakima MSA 112,400 97,800 14,600 13.0
 Adams 8,510 7,520 990 11.6
 Asotin 10,530 9,930 600 5.7
 Clallam 25,860 23,390 2,470 9.6
 Columbia 1,380 1,180 200 14.5
 Cowlitz 39,230 34,910 4,320 11.0
 Ferry 3,200 2,810 390 12.2
 Garfield 1,080 1,030 50 4.6
 Grant 31,570 27,940 3,630 11.5
 Grays Harbor 27,380 23,180 4,200 15.3
 Island 24,600 22,770 1,830 7.4
 Jefferson 9,910 9,130 780 7.9
 Kittitas 13,480 11,170 2,310 17.1
 Klickitat 9,100 7,940 1,160 12.7
 Lewis 28,940 25,590 3,350 11.6
 Lincoln 5,000 4,760 240 4.8
 Mason 15,950 14,370 1,580 9.9
 Okanogan 22,350 20,000 2,350 10.5
 Pacific 8,310 7,430 880 10.6
 Pend Oreille 3,770 3,290 480 12.7
 San Juan 7,830 7,490 340 4.3
 Skagit 45,440 40,660 4,780 10.5
 Skamania 2,210 1,750 460 20.8
 Stevens 13,140 11,680 1,460 11.1
 Wahkiakum 1,290 1,160 130 10.1
 Walla Walla 24,370 22,850 1,520 6.2
 Wenatchee Labor Area 53,970 49,160 4,810 8.9
 Chelan County (b) 35,490 32,140 3,350 9.4
 Douglas County (b) 18,470 17,020 1,450 7.9
 Whitman 17,450 16,840 610 3.5
 (a) Official U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics data.
 (b) Estimates are determined by using the Population/Claims Share
 disaggregation methodology.
 Note: Detail may not add due to rounding.
 -0- 8/31/93
 /CONTACT: Dennis Fusco, 206-438-4820 or Michael Wilson, 206-753-5216, both of Washington State Employment Security Department Labor Market and Economic Analysis Branch/


CO: Washington St. Employment Security Dept. ST: Washington IN: SU:

RB -- SE009 -- 7687 08/31/93 17:47 EDT
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Date:Aug 31, 1993
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