Printer Friendly

STATE BUDGET CUTS MEAN INCREASED PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT

 STATE BUDGET CUTS MEAN INCREASED PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
 LOS ANGELES, Sept. 2 /PRNewswire/ -- Parents wait too long to


monitor academic programs, thinking that it is the school's responsbility to inform them of their youngster's academic performance, said psychologist Robert R. Butterworth, Ph.D.
 "In a climate of academic budget cutting resulting in reduced school personnel and more students per class," Butterworth said, "Parents need to take the initiative in opening up a dialogue with their youngsters and teachers, not waiting until academic difficulties occur.
 "Many parents operate in a 'crisis' mode when it comes to their children's school performance," Butterworth said. "They wait until academic difficulties occur instead of getting involved at the beginning of the new school year."
 Butterworth said that when parents fail to keep track of their child's academic performance, they generally remain in the dark until late October when the first report card arrives.
 "By waiting, the parents allow the child to drift into bad habits that are difficult to break six weeks into the school year.
 "Parents should not rely on their children to give them honest feedback concerning negative performance in school. A child experiencing academic difficulty will usually be the last person to tell a parent that they are having trouble."
 Butterworth suggests establishing a behavior motivation system to reward tasks such as homework completion, study habits and positive school reports.
 Why parents fail:
 -- Failing to communicate early in the school year with their
 children's teachers to monitor their child's progress;
 -- Not exhibiting consistent interest or reviewing homework
 assignments on a daily basis;
 -- Failing to give encouragement and rewards for positive school
 achievement;
 -- Failure to establish clear goals and objectives concerning
 school performance;
 -- Anger outbursts or using guilt or harsh and threatening
 behavior to raise academic achievement.
 Parents need to grade themselves on:
 -- Their involvement in educational activities;
 -- How they recognize positive school performance;
 -- How often they communicate with teachers;
 -- How effectively they convey the importance of a good
 education.
 "Research shows a general relationship between parent's actions and their children's school accomplishments. Children perform better when they're expected to. Poor school performance is rarely a result of intellectual or academic ability, but a failure of parents to become involved in their youngsters' schooling when school begins," Butterworth said.
 -0- 9/2/92
 /CONTACT: Robert R. Butterworth, Ph.D., of Contemporary Psychology Associates, 213-487-7339/ CO: Contemporary Psychology Associates ST: California IN: SU:


AL -- LA012 -- 5875 09/02/92 11:29 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 2, 1992
Words:407
Previous Article:SHELL, SDG&E OPEN NATURAL GAS FUELING STATION
Next Article:JENNIFER MOORE SPEAKS ON TELEVISION AND BUSINESS NEWS IN THE '90s
Topics:


Related Articles
The role of parental involvement in youth sport participation and performance.
Education Wins Big in Budget Battle.
By the numbers: a data bank on education trends for district leaders.
'Great Public Schools for Every Child' the Theme of OEA's American Education Week Campaign.
GOVERNOR SHATTERED HIS PROMISE TO SCHOOLS.
Parental involvement and its influence on the reading achievement of 6th grade students.
Confidential services for teenagers.
Getting parents involved.
EDITORIAL PARENTS UNITED LAUSD MOMS AND DADS ARE MAD AND NOT GOING TO SIT IT OUT ANYMORE LAUSD moms and dads are mad and not going to sit it out...

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters