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STANFORD MEDICAL CENTER AND NEWPORT CENTER OFFER FRAMELESS STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY

 SANTA CLARA, Calif., Dec. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The following was released by ACCURAY Inc. today:
 Surgical treatment of brain tumors is difficult. In order to excise diseased tissue, surgeons must destroy or disturb much of the surrounding healthy tissue. A successful alternative to invasive surgery is radiation treatment, however some types of tumors and arteriovenous malformations (defective blood vessels) do not respond well to conventional radiation methods.
 Stereotactic radiosurgery allows high-dose beams of radiation to be targeted at a tumor while reducing the damage to surrounding tissue. Unlike standard radiation treatment, in which the tumor is treated from only a few angles with large diameters beams, sterotactic radiosurgery treats the tumor with hundreds of small diameter beams of different angles that are carefully determined by computer. The linear accelerator, LINAC, that produces the radiation beams is programmed to target tumors from different points in space, but all of the beams are directed to a precise point known as the isocenter, which is the heart of the tumor. By treating the tumor in this fashion, most of the directed radiation lies inside the tumor envelope. A drawback to this kind of treatment is the required use of a stereotactic frame that must be screwed into the skull of the patient and left in place during the treatment, which may take all day.
 ACCURAY Inc., Santa Clara, is pleased to announce that it has completed arrangements for the clinical demonstration of its new system for stereotactic radiosurgery, the Neurotron 1000. The Neurotron 1000 is a significant improvement over current systems in that it provides precise delivery of radiation dose without the need for a stereotactic frame. In addition, the articulated arm that the Neurotron 1000 uses provides much more positioning flexibility than conventional systems. While conventional stereotactic radiosurgery systems move only along arcs that lie on the surface of a sphere, the Neurotron 1000 is able to move in arbitrary paths, such as spirals. This extra flexibility allows for better tumor treatment and reduces the amount of radiation to healthy tissue.
 The first Neurotron 1000 will be installed at Stanford University Hospital in Stanford, Calif. during the first quarter of 1993. The second Neurotron 1000 will be installed in the medical plaza of Newport Center in Newport Beach, Calif. during the second quarter of 1993. The Stanford researchers are primarily concerned with optimizing the systems inherent flexibility, whereas the Newport system will be dedicated to conducting clinical work.
 The primary objective of the first few clinical trials is to show safe and effective treatment in neurosurgical applications. However, because the system is flexible in comparison with available alternatives, ACCURAY expects that eventually the system will be used for both stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy (precision radiation treatment in other parts of the body). The stereotactic radiotherapy uses of the system are one of the driving forces of the Stanford research team.
 -0- 12/17/92
 /CONTACT: Bo Preising, product manager of ACCURAY, 408-982-9900/


CO: ACCURAY Inc.; Stanford Medical Center; Newport Center ST: California IN: MTC SU: PDT

GT-SG -- SJ002 -- 8056 12/17/92 09:03 EST
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Date:Dec 17, 1992
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