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SPACE BUSINESS NEWS REVEALS CLINTON MAY KILL BUSH'S NATIONAL SPACE COUNCIL, TRIM SPACE STATION

 POTOMAC, Md., Dec. 31 /PRNewswire/ -- In an attempt to make good on several campaign promises, President-elect Clinton and his team of Science and Space Transition Team members are looking at paring back funding for the multi-billion dollar Space Station Freedom effort, rewriting NASA's role in commercial space development and liquidating Vice President Quayle's favorite industry bully pulpit, the National Space Council. In the Jan. 4, 1993, issue of Space Business News, contributing editor Melinda Gipson reports that:
 1) Clinton transition team advisers are preparing for a February meeting at which the new administration will review options for downsizing the space station yet again. The president-elect is said to be unwilling to consider terminating station -- "He doesn't want to lose the jobs," in the words of one source close to the team. But everything else is on the table to reduce costs, including a bare bones design that will eliminate the truss structure and pare operations to a minimum. Ballooning costs, experienced by some parts of the program, won't be tolerated, sources agree. Complicating factors include an initial deployment date for space station of 1996, and the fact that the current program includes major contractors and workers in nearly all 50 states. Congress, as recently as two years ago, restructured station, significantly reducing the size and scope of the program.
 2) Another prospect is the elimination of the National Space Council in favor of a broader National Technology Council headed by Vice President-elect Gore, but that would involve statutory changes so the body isn't likely to be revamped overnight. The National Space Council is a White House group chaired by Vice President Quayle with a charter to advise the president on matters relating to space policy.
 3) Still another idea eyed by the Clinton administration is one that would split off NASA's Centers for the Commercial Development of Space from the space agency for integration with a new civil technology agency or the much-touted Centers for Excellence promised from the stump. Ray Askew, head of the Center for Commercial Space Power and Advanced Electronics at Auburn University, worries that removing the centers from the agency that can afford them access to space "seems to me to create a bureaucratic nightmare." This is the latest attempt to reorganize NASA, which has been restructured several times in recent years.
 Space Business News is published by Maryland-based Phillips Business Information, Inc. PBI also publishes Space Station News, Space Exploration Technology, Satellite News and Via Satellite magazine. PBI provides a broad range of business information resources including newsletters, magazines, directories and conferences in the fields of telecommunications, data communications, financial services, defense and aviation.
 -0- 12/31/92
 /CONTACT: John Farley or Jennifer Wunder of Phillips Business Information, 301-340-2100/


CO: Phillips Business Information, Inc. ST: Maryland IN: PUB ARO SU:

TW -- DC006 -- 0915 12/31/92 13:02 EST
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