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SOUTHWEST AND KENDELL AIRLINES WIN TOP HONORS IN ATW AWARDS PROGRAM

SOUTHWEST AND KENDELL AIRLINES WIN TOP HONORS IN ATW AWARDS PROGRAM
 WASHINGTON, Feb. 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Southwest Airlines and Kendell Airlines are recipients of Air Transport World's 1991 Airline of the Year awards in the magazine's 18th annual achievement awards program. ATW editors also honored CFM International for technical achievement; Robert L. Crandall, chairman and CEO of AMR Corporation for industry service; Virgin Atlantic Airways for passenger service; and Japan Airlines for media/public relations.
 Presentation of awards will take place in Singapore on Feb. 24 in conjunction with the Asian Aerospace '92 Show.
 1991 Airline of the Year, Southwest Airlines of Dallas, has demonstrated excellence over the years in disciplines required for safe, reliable and fairly priced air transportation, reports Air Transport World's February 1992 issue.
 Southwest began in 1971 as a small three-airplane carrier operating entirely within Texas. In 1990, Southwest was the only U.S. major airline to show both an operating and net profit. Last year, when almost no airlines enjoyed profits, Southwest reported its 19th consecutive profit.
 Southwest operates a fleet of 123 Boeing 737s, -200s, -300s and -500s. Its basic philosophy is to provide a solid spread of frequencies in its markets, generally going into a new market with 10 or more trips a day. Southwest's basic operating philosophy is efficiency. Fares are low, averaging less than $55 per ticket. The airline now serves 32 cities in 14 states, its most notable recent achievement a successful penetration of hotly contested California markets.
 Southwest is notable for the atmosphere created by its chairman, president and CEO, Herb Kelleher. He makes working fun for his 9,800 employees and for his customers as well.
 1991 Commuter/Regional Airline of the Year, Australia-based Kendell Airlines, is that country's largest regional carrier and the only airline there to post a profit last year. Kendell has come a long way since the days when it operated 10 round-trip weekday flights, using a single twin-engine Piper Navajo. Today, the airline employs some 190 people, using six Saab 340As and eight Fairchild Metros to 21 destinations. Last year it carried some 320,000 people, posting a $A35 million profit.
 From 1967 through the early 1970s, when the airline was named Premiair Aviation, it scheduled service and charter by day and hauled freight by night. Two years passed before a flight was canceled for maintenance reasons. Even then, Kendell had a solid reputation for reliability.
 In February 1975, the airline's founder, Don Kendell, purchased the first of two four-engine Lycoming-powered Riley/de Havilland Herons. Kendell bought the first of eight 16-passenger Fairchild Metroliner IIs in 1976. The first of six Saab 340s commenced service in February 1985. By 1988, annual passenger carriage had exceeded 240,000 per year. Kendell Airlines has been profitable for eight of the last 10 years and boasts a dispatch reliability of some 99 percent. Last year, Australia's Civil Aviation Authority recognized the carrier for its excellence.
 CFM International, a French/United States company, is winner of the 1991 Airline Technology Achievement Award for its CFM56 family of power plants. The CFM56 brought the quiet, efficiency and economy of high-bypass-engine technology to the middle-thrust ranges, capturing the majority of that market.
 In business since 1974, CFM International is jointly owned by SNECMA and General Electric.
 In 1981, the CFM56 flew on its first successful commercial application, a DC-8 re-engining program. Although CFM-powered Boeing 737s are ubiquitous today, the first 737-300 flew only nine years ago. Today, the 737 is the CFM56's most popular commercial mount racking up orders and options for more than 2,200 airplanes. Total orders for all versions of the CFM56 stand at well over 11,000 engines. Still selling well on 737s and Airbus Industrie A320s, the engine will begin service on a new transport, the very long-range Airbus A340, this year.
 Robert L. Crandall, chairman and CEO of AMR Corporation, parent company of American Airlines, received the Industry Service Award.
 Crandall has been an advocate of the interests of a deregulated airline industry. His vigorous approach has won him considerable respect within the industry.
 Unique among airline CEOs by defending the pricing strategies of the industry before Congress and the business community, Crandall has broached "untouchable" subjects, such as the high cost to the airline industry of "social-cause" legislation.
 A list of innovations to which Crandall's name always will be attached: the computer reservations system; market-rate wages (the "B" Scale); frequent-flier programs; super-saver fares and yield management.
 Virgin Atlantic Airways is the winner of the 1991 Passenger Service Award. Started in 1984, London-based Virgin Atlantic, which employs 7,500, has set service standards by which other airlines are being judged.
 Founder and chairman, entertainment tycoon Richard Branson, labeled his top service Upper Class, structuring its fares in direct competition with other carriers' business classes. Seating in Virgin's fleet of 747s provides recliner seats with up to 15 inches more leg room than most business-class seating. Individual video sets are provided for Upper Class, while economy class has individual seat-back videos. Virgin offers free head, neck and shoulder massages to Upper Class, and manicures are available. Comfort in economy class is ensured by seats that are pitched at 34 inches rather than the standard 31.
 Passenger surveys conducted by London airport authorities give the airline a 99 percent loyalty rating for business-class travelers and 97 percent for economy class. This loyalty has provided a 240 percent passenger growth between 1985-86 and 1989-90, from 226,808 to 770,427.
 Winner of the 1991 Airline Media/Public Relations Award is the public relations staff of Japan Airlines who has demonstrated innovation, extra effort, and consistent excellence. JAL's PR staff is involved in the publication of no fewer than seven periodicals, including a monthly and a quarterly in English. The staff maintains a stock of fact sheets published in several languages covering more than 50 topics relating to the airline's operations.
 -0- 2/4/92
 /CONTACT: James P. Woolsey, senior editor/associate publisher, Air Transport World, 202-659-8500/ CO: Air Transport World ST: District of Columbia IN: AIR SU:


TW -- DC004 -- 6803 02/04/92 15:09 EST
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