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SOCALGAS HELPS SOUTH CENTRAL LOS ANGELES STUDENTS LEARN TO 'ECO' RAP FOR MOTHER EARTH IN YOUTH JOB FAIR

 LOS ANGELES, Nov. 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Students at Jefferson High School will soon have "rhyme and reason" as a new tool to clean up Southern California's pollution when they're introduced to a new form of rap music at the "Youth Environmental, Educational and Career Festival" on Tuesday, Nov. 16, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Jefferson High School's quad cafeteria, 1319 E. 41st St., Los Angeles.
 The purpose of the event, which is sponsored by The Gas Company, Concerned Citizens of South Central Los Angeles and Jefferson High School Community Revitalization Project, in association with "Eco-Rap", is to bring inner-city youth closer to careers, educational opportunities and issues relating to environmentalism.
 Rap Artist A.K. Black and the group "Eco-Rap" will help judge student entries in a "Rap on the Environment" contest. Other Los Angeles rap artists are expected to tour toxic sites and write and perform rap music at the event.
 A.K. Black, who started his unique ecology movement two years ago after winning a rap contest himself, takes the environment seriously and has delivered his "eco-rap" to thousands of young people in the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, Chicago and New York, and just wrapped up a tour in Germany.
 "Eco-Rap" has been described as a group trying to unite environmental movements and the burgeoning community of rap artists who have come to recognize the disastrous effects that toxic wastes or pollution can have on urban environments.
 Lead poisoning, air and water pollution and hazardous waste dumping are issues rarely selected by rap singers. But "Eco-Rap" brings young urban people into the ecological movement where many disadvantaged communities have become the dumping ground for polluters.
 In one of their popular rap songs these "clean-air champions" sing about smoggy skies with such lyrics as "The atmosphere and the air might appear clear, but beware 'cause what's not seen is still there".
 Black believes that "eco-rapping" delivers a message in their music that grabs the attention of inner-city young people. "Youth won't sit down and pick up a newspaper, but if a magazine has their favorite star on the cover, they'll open it," he said.
 In addition to the rap contest, students will also have the opportunity to view environmental displays and discuss environmental careers and issues with representatives from the Gas Company and other community organizations.
 "Eco-Rap" has produced a 30-second public service announcement with environmental rap music for radio and television in English and Spanish encouraging students to attend the festivities at Jefferson High School.
 -0- 11/15/93
 /CONTACT: George McQuade of The Gas Company, 213-244-3030; or RaJendra Samana of Concerned Citizens of South Central Los Angeles, 213-235-1128/


CO: The Gas Company; Concerned Citizens of South Central Los Angeles ST: California IN: UTI ENV SU:

JB-JL -- LA003 -- 4347 11/15/93 11:16 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Nov 15, 1993
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