Printer Friendly

SO COLUMBUS WASN'T FIRST, SO WHAT? SO STUDIES NOW SHOW HE KNEW IT!

SO COLUMBUS WASN'T FIRST, SO WHAT? SO STUDIES NOW SHOW HE KNEW IT!
 NEW YORK, Sept. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Heresy of heresies, in his self- dubbed heretical history, "Columbus Was Last," science writer-author Patrick Huyghe unleashes a shocker: he knew it!
 "Columbus Was Last, From 200,000 B.C. to 1492, A Heretical History of Who Was First," (Hyperion, $22.95) goes into detail about everybody who came to the New World before Columbus -- from Libyan, Jewish, Hindi and Polynesian explorers on through Vikings, Chinese, Japanese, Welshmen and even other Italians and Portuguese.
 One of the most fascinating aspects of the highly documented history, however, is Huyghe's review of extensive evidence indicating Columbus knew full well about a number of other explorations to the New World although he, of course, thought he was going to India.
 "There are historians who say that when Columbus travelled north, he heard about the Norse voyages to Vinland and the exploration of other navigators," he said.
 "Peter Martyer, the Italian humanist who served as a tutor for the royal family of Spain in the late 15th century and who later wrote extensively about Columbus and probably met him at one time or another, said that Columbus identified on his maps the body of water surrounding the West Indies as 'Welsh Waters.'"
 Huyghe says this documentation supports the theory that Columbus knew about the New World voyage conducted by Welsh explorer Madoc."
 Huyghe notes another theory: that Columbus based his crossing of the Atlantic on the route St. Brendan followed in the sixth century.
 "This hypothesis leans heavily on one particular historical episode," Huyghe says.
 In 1486, King John II of Portugal turned down Columbus' proposal but then decided to charter a Portuguese expedition by Fernao Dulmo to test Columbus' scheme. The expedition was instructed to depart from the Azores, sail west, and carry provisions for 40 days outbound. These stipulations, according to one prominent historian, follow precisely the successful westward leg of the Brendan journey.
 Fernando, in his biography of his father, states that when Columbus subsequently discussed his plans with the Spanish court, he did not reveal all the details, 'fearing lest it be stolen from him in Castile as it had been in Portugal.' To many scholars, this is an obvious admission by Fernando that his father's plan to cross the Ocean Sea had been none other than Brendan's."
 And while Huyghe admits that Columbus' arrival in the New World was of great significance, he also points out that this continent's flawed history should be corrected.
 "When Columbus set foot in America, there were about 500 tribes of people in the continental United States alone, and many more spread throughout the rest of the Americas," Huyghe says. "Yet, their presence there is often ignored or overlooked by some scholars who persist in the simplistic thinking that the history of this continent began with the arrival of a God-ordained, Spanish-funded, Italian-born navigator extraordinaire.
 "The credit for the discovery of the Americans should rightfully be given to the ancestors of the Native Americans."
 As for those who preceded Columbus, Huyghe presents the most substantial evidence to date that Columbus reached the New World perhaps as much as 200,000 years after his predecessors. Huyghe cites data from a variety of archaeologists, geographers, and geologists that indicated Libyan, Jewish, Hindi, and Polynesian explorers -- among others -- all crossed the Atlantic well before Columbus.
 "There is strong evidence that there were repeated transoceanic contacts between China and the Americas over the millennia. It appears that the Japanese were present in Ecuador more than 5,500 years ago and that the Scandinavians made numerous visits to these shores before the Vikings," Huyghe says. "While most of us are familiar with the ancient navigators Leif Erikson and St. Brendan, there is a group of important and virtually unknown explorers that includes the Chinese surveyor Shu- Hai, the Mandingan emperor Abubakari II, the Norwegian king Woden-lithi, the Welshman Madoc, the Italian Antonio Zeno, the Portuguese Joao Vas Core Real, and Henry Sinclair, Earl of Orkney. Although their identities are forgotten and their voyages are, at best, sketchy, all may have reached America just under the 1492 wire."
 Finally, Huyghe presents compelling evidence to support the theory that Columbus was indeed the last explorer to reach the Americas.
 About the Author: Patrick Huyghe is a freelance science writer and co-author with Dr. Louis Frank of "The Big Splash." He has written numerous articles for publications such as Omni, New York, The New York Times Magazine, The Sciences, Audubon, and Discover, and was a science producer for PBS stations WNET in New York and WGBH in Boston. He now lives in Putnam Valley, N.Y.
 -0- 9/17/92
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: Huyghe is available for interviews, review copies available./
 /CONTACT: Jennifer Landers of Hyperion, 212-633-4483/ CO: Hyperion ST: New York IN: PUB SU:


SM -- NYCFNS2 -- 0415 09/17/92 06:50 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 17, 1992
Words:820
Previous Article:IDEX ANNOUNCES 9-3/4 PERCENT RATE ON $75,000,000 SENIOR SUBORDINATED NOTE ISSUE
Next Article:FIRST UNION CORPORATION NEWS RELEASE
Topics:


Related Articles
LOWER AIR FARES ATTRACT RECORD NUMBERS OF PASSENGERS AT PORT COLUMBUS
Discovering Columbus: a bibliographic probe.
The Imaginative Landscape of Christopher Columbus.
LOSS DOESN'T HAUNT KINGS COLUMBUS 4, KINGS 1.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters