Printer Friendly

SMALL BUSINESS SURVEY REVEALS PROBLEMS FINDING QUALIFIED JOB APPLICANTS

 SMALL BUSINESS SURVEY REVEALS PROBLEMS
 FINDING QUALIFIED JOB APPLICANTS
 WASHINGTON, May 6 /PRNewswire/ -- In a survey of small businesses by the National Alliance of Business (NAB), more than half of the companies reported they have a problem finding applicants for entry level positions who possess the basic skills they consider most important in making hiring decisions. Small businesses in the United States provide two out of every three new workers their first jobs.
 -- 70 percent of the small businesses reported having difficulty
 finding applicants with the necessary writing skills to handle
 an entry level position.
 -- 59 percent reported problems finding applicants with the
 necessary reading skills.
 -- 62 percent reported problems finding applicants with the
 requisite math skills.
 Commenting on the results of the survey, NAB President William H. Kolberg said: "It is critical that we adopt a national standard for educational attainment so that educators can understand the needs of employers. We are short-changing our children by not preparing them adequately for the work place. We must upgrade academic and other skills so that the 75 percent of our youth which does not graduate from college can hold satisfying, well paying jobs," he added.
 The NAB survey covered the five Foundation Skills and the seven Competencies identified by a government commission as important for success in the work place. The U.S. Department of Labor Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) recommended recently that schools and businesses use the 12 skills and competencies as guidelines for preparing for, and measuring, worker readiness.
 The alliance's members were asked to indicate the importance of each of the 12 guidelines to them as they recruit new workers into entry-level jobs. They were then asked to rank the difficulty of finding candidates who met their expectations in each category. For example, 95.7 percent of respondents said that reading ability is fairly important to very important to these jobs; 59.9 percent said they sometimes or usually have a problem finding young people who can read well enough to hire.
 Other findings included some difficulty in locating new workers who listen well to work directions; 98.6 percent said this is a fairly important or very important skill but 64 percent said they have problems finding good listeners. Nearly 60 percent of the respondents reported that they have problems finding new workers who can work well with others as a member of a team and interface effectively with customers.
 The difficulties encountered by these smaller businesses mirror problems encountered by the nation's largest corporations. In 1990, NAB surveyed the 1,200 largest public and private corporations regarding the experiences of human resources officers in hiring new employees entering the workforce. At that time, only 36 percent of respondents said they were satisfied with the competency of job applicants. These companies indicated that they had to interview seven or eight applicants to find one satisfactory worker. Only 16 percent said they were satisfied with the education of new employees and most said it appeared to them that the math and reading skills of applicants had worsened over the years.
 "Small businesses, which can least afford it, told us they are spending more money each year on remedial education and basic training for their new employees," said Kolberg. "Many of these smaller companies simply cannot afford to spend money upgrading worker skills, so they must hire older workers who will accept low wages or reduce the complexity of work to accommodate unskilled workers."
 The study polled about 2,500 small business members of the Alliance, defined as employing less than 500 workers, and is based on returns from 233 companies. Forty percent of these companies described themselves as a manufacturing business, and the remainder as service oriented.
 According to the U.S. Bureau of Census, more than 6 million -- over 98 percent -- of the 6.1 million U.S. companies employ less than 500 people.
 NAB is a business-led, non-profit organization based in Washington, dedicated to improving the quality of the American workforce.
 -0- 5/6/92
 /CONTACT: Keith Poston of the National Alliance of Business, 202-289-2834/ CO: National Alliance of Business ST: District of Columbia IN: SU:


TW -- DC027 -- 7142 05/06/92 13:21 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:May 6, 1992
Words:702
Previous Article:QUICKTURN'S EMULATION PATENT ISSUED
Next Article:VALHI INC. DECLARES QUARTERLY DIVIDEND AND HOLDS ANNUAL STOCKHOLDER MEETING
Topics:


Related Articles
EMPLOYERS SAY THEY WOULD RECOMMEND MESC'S JOB SERVICE; SURVEY FINDINGS RATE JOB SERVICE HIGHLY IN MOST AREAS
A good worker is hard to find.
Thumbs down to city council, survey says.
Small business employment.
A dismal outlook: survey reveals small businesses are doubtful about the nation's economy.
Michigan Businesses Look to Hire Ten's of Thousands in 2008 - Expect Many Positions to Go Unfilled.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters