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SIX CENTRAL EUROPEAN JOURNALISTS TO STUDY PRESS AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN U.S.

 SIX CENTRAL EUROPEAN JOURNALISTS TO STUDY
 PRESS AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN U.S.
 CHICAGO, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Six Central European environmental journalists will study environmental reporting techniques and environmental policies in the United States during a six-week fellowship program organized by the National Safety Council's Environmental Health Center (EHC).
 Environmental reporters from TV, radio, newspapers and magazines in Czechoslovakia, Germany, Hungary and Poland will participate in the cross-country Central European Environmental Journalism Program from April 16 to May 28.
 The six Central European journalists chosen to participate in the 1992 fellowship program are:
 -- Jan Baltus, Technicky Tydenik, Brno, Czech and
 Slovak Federal Republic.
 -- Zuzana Novakova, Radio Profil Pardubice, Czech
 and Slovak Federal Republic.
 -- Eugeniusz Pudlis, Wypolnota, Warsaw, Poland.
 -- Marta Sarvari, Magyar Nemzet, Budapest, Hungary.
 -- Adelheid Scholz, Mitteldeutscher Rundfunk (MDR Broadcasting),
 Leipzig, Germany.
 -- Josef Tucek, Mlada fronta Dnes, Prague, Czech and Slovak
 Federal Republic.
 Now in its second year, the program provides the European journalists working insights into the roles of the independent press in the U.S., and shows them practical pollution control techniques relevant to their countries' problems. Among environmental leaders with whom the reporters will meet are U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator William K. Reilly; Smithsonian Institution Assistant Secretary for External Affairs Thomas E. Lovejoy; and World Watch Institute President Lester Brown.
 "Central Europe's emerging democracies face daunting pollution problems as a result of decades of environmental neglect," said T.C. Gilchrest, National Safety Council president. "The region's free press will be critical to those societies' confronting and overcoming those problems, and our program is designed to help them do so."
 The program was one of the first launched in the United States to help Central European journalists examine and expand their roles at a time of historic social, economic and political changes. Reporters in many parts of Central Europe now openly write about pollution problems which once were considered taboo.
 EHC this year is co-sponsoring the fellowship with the independent U.S.-based Society of Environmental Journalists.
 The "Journalists Helping Journalists" program is designed also to benefit American reporters involved in the project. Central European journalists will learn U.S. reporters' experiences in covering pollution control, waste management and related environmental issues. U.S. print and broadcast journalists gain broader perspectives on environmental issues in other parts of the world by working with their Central European counterparts.
 The 1992 Central European Environmental Journalism Program is being underwritten through an unusual public/private/foundation sector headed by The German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF), an independent American foundation which pioneered the fellowship in 1991. In addition to a second-year grant of $55,000 from GMF, the program this year is supported also by congressionally appropriated funds administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Support for Eastern European Democracy Act; and by corporate contributions provided by The Boeing Co. and by Dow Chemical USA.
 The six European reporters arrive April 16 in Washington where they will spend one week with environmental managers, policy makers, citizen activists, legislators, government regulators and scholars. The journalists then will travel for four weeks to various sites around the U.S., beginning with the world's largest estuary, the Chesapeake Bay; to California for site visits and meetings in Los Angeles and San Francisco; to Boulder and Denver, Colo.; and then to Louisiana, along the Gulf Coast and through what many refer to as the "chemical corridor."
 In mid-May, the reporters will travel to Pittsburgh and Harrisburg, Pa., and then to Washington before returning to their home countries on May 28.
 The Environmental Health Center is a Washington-based non-profit, non-governmental organization that works to enhance media coverage of environmental issues. It is a division of the National Safety Council, a Chicago-based not-for-profit, non-governmental public service organization dedicated to safety and health.
 The German Marshall Fund of the United States is an independent American foundation established in 1972 as a memorial to the post-World War II Marshall Plan.
 -0- 4/2/92
 /CONTACT: Bud Ward or Jan O'Brien of Environmental Health Center, 202-293-2270/ CO: Environmental Health Center ST: Illinois IN: SU:


TS -- NYFNS1 -- 4678 04/03/92 07:30 EST
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