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SECTUR ISSUES STATEMENT ON NEW ENTRANCE REGULATION FOR U.S. VEHICLES

 SECTUR ISSUES STATEMENT ON NEW ENTRANCE REGULATION FOR U.S. VEHICLES
 MEXICO CITY, Jan. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- On Jan. 8, the Mexican Secretariat of Finance issued a regulation concerning the temporary importation of vehicles from the United States. The new regulation -- intended to prevent the importation of vehicles into Mexico for the purposes of illegally reselling them there and thus avoiding applicable taxes and duties -- has caused some confusion for U.S. visitors to Mexico. In its ongoing effort to facilitate road travel to Mexico, however, Mexico's Secretariat of Tourism (SECTUR) has issued the following statement to clarify the regulation's requirements:
 The new regulation simply requires that visitors driving a car or other passenger vehicle into Mexico furnish customs authorities with an additional piece of documentation. Before the new regulation went into effect, travelers driving to Mexico had to provide the following documents:
 -- Proof of nationality and tourist card;
 -- Driver's license; and
 -- A copy of the title to the vehicle or of the applicable rental
 agreement, or an affidavit from the owner of the vehicle, if he
 or she was not the driver, consenting to its movement into
 Mexico.
 The new regulation requires that the driver now also furnish a copy of his or her automobile insurance policy, or, in its absence, a surety bond issued by a Mexican company for the entire "blue book" value of the car. The driver's full-coverage automobile insurance policy (liability, comprehensive, and collision), must have been issued by a foreign insurance company and it must be in effect for at least two months from the date of entrance into Mexico.
 When these requirements are met, a temporary import permit will be issued. This permit allows multiple entrances within a period of six months.
 None of these requirements applies to vehicles traveling within an area approximately 12 miles of the border or within the states of Baja California and Baja California Sur.
 Mexico's documentation requirements for visitors from the U.S. have always been liberal, unfortunately enabling profiteers from both sides of the border to take advantage of them. These individuals, posing as tourists, would drive their cars into Mexico, sell them, and pocket the proceeds without paying duties and taxes. Currently, there are an estimated 500,000 illegal automobiles in Mexico.
 The new regulation will prevent this kind of abuse and once its requirements are widely known should not cause unwarranted delays at the border.
 For more information on road travel to Mexico, contact the Mexican Government Tourism Office in San Antonio, Texas, at 512-366-3242.
 -0- 1/16/92
 /CONTACT: Marivi Lerdo or Melody Kimmel of Fleishman-Hillard, 212-265-9150, for Mexico Travel News/ CO: Mexico Travel News ST: IN: LEI SU:


JT -- NY052 -- 0524 01/16/92 12:38 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jan 16, 1992
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