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SCRIPPS HOWARD FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES

 CINCINNATI, March 8 /PRNewswire/ -- The Scripps Howard Foundation today announced the winners of its 1992 National Journalism Awards.
 Five newspapers, three individuals, three television stations and two radio stations were recognized for their efforts in 13 categories ranging from human interest writing and public service to support of literacy and defense of the First Amendment. Bronze plaques and $39,000 in cash prizes will be awarded at a banquet hosted by Scripps Howard (NASDAQ: SCRP) and its television station WEWS on April 16 in Cleveland.
 The winners are:
 Blaine Harden, The Washington Post -- Human interest writing. Harden will receive $2,500 and the Ernie Pyle Award plaque.
 In the spirit of Scripps Howard's famed World War II correspondent, Harden told the stories of troops in the Balkan war zone. Judges said: "The stage was Sarajevo, but each scene portrayed by Harden was a surprise in focus, augmented by depth, detail and definite craftsmanship. His reporting about great human adversity and resilience exemplified Ernie Pyle's work."
 Robert Friedman, St. Petersburg Times -- Editorial writing. Friedman will receive $2,000 and the Walker Stone Award plaque.
 Friedman won for a collection of editorials that brought historical perspective and context to 1992. Judges said: "Robert Friedman displayed an astounding array of talent and topics. His work was also concise, clear and extremely well crafted."
 The Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel -- Environmental reporting, over 100,000 circulation. The Sentinel will receive $2,000 and an Edward J. Meeman Award plaque, recognizing the work of reporters John Glisch, Alex Beasley and Mary Beth Regan.
 Regarding The Sentinel's year-long study of the contamination of Florida's ground water, judges said: "The articles were exceptionally well-researched and well-written, explaining in vivid human terms the impact of man's actions on Florida's most precious natural resource -- water. The authors showed great understanding of their subject, avoiding the trap of blaming big industry for all environmental problems. The Sentinel showed how the actions of small businesses, the military and even individual citizens can have a devastating impact."
 The National Law Journal, New York -- Environmental reporting, under 100,000 circulation. The Journal will receive $2,000 and an Edward J. Meeman Award plaque recognizing the work of reporters Marianne Lavelle and Claudia MacLachlan, and Washington, D.C. bureau chief Marcia Coyle.
 An eight-month investigation found that white communities see faster action, better results and stiffer penalties against violators of environmental law than neighborhoods where blacks, Hispanics and other minorities live. Judges said: "This was an impressive, innovative research project that persuasively made its startling point with both telling statistics and human stories. It was an important piece of work that should forever change the way environmental laws are enforced. We were equally impressed by the scope and objectivity of the research."
 San Francisco Examiner -- Public service reporting, over 100,000 circulation. The Examiner will receive $2,500 and a Roy W. Howard Award plaque.
 The newspaper's entry consisted of four exclusive reports by Seth Rosenfeld that told how Dow Corning Corp. had -- for more than a decade -- covered up health risks of silicone breast implants used by tens of thousands of women. His reporting prompted quick action in Congress and at the Food and Drug Administration. By April 1992, the FDA had adopted new rules restricting the use of silicone, hundreds of women had sued Dow, which is now out of the silicone business, and a serious potential health risk had been adequately exposed. Judges said: "Rosenfeld's determination to look beyond an obscure verdict and his newspaper's dedication to public service sparked a national debate and prompted reforms that otherwise might not have happened. Few stories have had more national impact in a shorter period of time. It is in the highest tradition of journalistic responsibility."
 The Albuquerque (N.M.) Tribune -- Public service reporting, under
100,000 circulation. The Tribune will receive $2,500 and a Roy W.


Howard Award plaque recognizing work by reporters Lynn Bartels, Ed Asher and Dan Vukelich.
 From April to December 1992, The Tribune explored every aspect of the drunken driving (DWI) problem. Articles appeared as news stories, columns and editorials. Through personal stories and computer assisted analysis of 68,400 DWI citations, The Tribune demonstrated the failure of the system. The series galvanized city, county and state officials into remedial action. Judges said: "The Tribune's series is a classic example of a newspaper-wide effort toward a significant public service."
 David Lawrence, Jr., The Miami Herald -- Service to the First Amendment. The publisher and chairman of The Miami Herald will receive $2,500 and the newspaper will receive an Edward Willis Scripps Award plaque.
 Lawrence was recognized for his defense of the First Amendment when faced with opposition to the newspaper's editorial that cautioned against tightening the U.S. economic embargo against Cuba. Judges said: "In a remarkable series of five signed columns, Lawrence described the ensuing crisis as a 'defining moment' for both The Herald and the city of Miami ... With his brave, balanced reaction in the face of threats both to his live and to his profession, Lawrence upheld America's most cherished democratic principles of free expression and fair play."
 The Anderson (S.C.) Independent-Mail -- Service in support of literacy, newspaper category. The Independent-Mail will receive $2,500 and will designate a literacy program in its community to receive a $5,000 grant from the Scripps Howard Foundation. The newspaper will also receive a Charles E. Scripps Award plaque.
 The Independent-Mail was recognized for a multi-faceted approach to fostering reading in the community, which has a 25 percent illiteracy rate. Judges said: "The newspaper became a catalyst in its community to bring together resources from other companies and organizations to promote literacy."
 KTSP-TV, Phoenix, Ariz. -- Service in support of literacy, broadcast/cable category. KTSP will receive $2,500, and will designate a literacy program in its community to receive a $5,000 grant from the Scripps Howard Foundation. KTSP will also receive a Charles E. Scripps Award plaque.
 Reporter Bud Wilkinson completed 20 hours of training to become a reading tutor, hosted a three-part series on literacy volunteers, then chronicled his student's progress in an ongoing series. Judges said: "Bud Wilkinson is to be honored not only for his journalism, but also for his deep personal commitment ... The report is a fine example of story enterprise. The story skillfully integrated many aspects of the literacy story."
 KGLT, Montana State University, Bozeman, Mont. -- Excellence in broadcast/cable journalism, small market radio category. The station will receive $2,000 and a Jack R. Howard Award plaque.
 The day before the Presidential Election, KGLT aired a report that emphasized the optimism people feel toward their government and urged citizens to vote. Judges said: "The program reminded us that even when government fails, we must always remember that it has the potential to succeed. This piece served as a welcome counterpoint to much of the reporting of the 1992 election."
 WHAS-AM, Louisville, Ky. -- Excellence in broadcast/cable journalism, large market radio category. The station will receive $2,000 and a Jack R. Howard plaque.
 Station WHAS offered an in-depth look at the health, education, economy and politics of recession-ridden Eastern Kentucky. Of the four- hour, five part documentary, judges said: "The program brought listeners important information about rural and small town citizens. It was a fine, sensitivity-raising series."
 WTOC-TV, Savannah, Ga. -- Excellence in broadcast/cable journalism, small market television. WTOC will receive $2,000 and a Jack R. Howard Award plaque.
 Station WTOC profiled Savannah civil rights leader W.W. Law. Judges said: "The program underscores the importance of preserving a community's oral history. WTOC is commended for the quality and technique of their photography, which enhanced this sensitive and moving story."
 KSTP-TV, St. Paul, Minn. -- Excellence in broadcast/cable journalism, large market television. KSTP will receive $2,000 and a Jack R. Howard Award plaque.
 KSTP's four-month investigation exposes how a coach of Minnesota's most prestigious youth baseball team had been molesting children for years. As a result, the coach, who was also a veteran police officer, was suspended from both positions. Judges said: "KSTP demonstrated admirable tenacity in digging out the details of this story, which had occurred years earlier. The story was important for the community and its impact on victims, their parents, the coach and his team."
 HUMAN INTEREST WRITING
 FINALISTS: Kathy Kemp, Birmingham (Ala.) Post-Herald; Mitch Albom, Detroit Free Press
 JUDGES: Timothy M. Kelly, editor and senior vice president, The Lexington (Ky.) Herald-Leader; Angus McEachran, editor and vice president, The Commercial Appeal, Memphis, Tenn.; and Sandra M. Rowe, executive editor and vice president, The Virginian-Pilot/The Ledger Star, Norfolk, Va.
 EDITORIAL WRITING
 FINALISTS: Richard L. Aregood, Philadelphia Daily News; Robert M. Landauer, The (Portland) Oregonian.
 JUDGES: Cynthia Tucker, editorial page editor, The Atlanta Constitution; Thomas H. Greer, vice president and senior editor The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer; and Sterlin Holmesly, editorial director; San Antonio Express-News.
 ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTING
 FINALISTS. Over 100,000 Circulation Category: St. Petersburg Times; The Philadelphia Inquirer; and The Miami Herald
 FINALISTS. Under 100,000 Circulation Category: El Paso (Texas) Times; The Muskegon (Mich.) Chronicle; and The (Lakeland, Fla.) Ledger.
 JUDGES: Jim Amoss, editor, The (New Orleans) Times-Picayune; Marcia McQuern, president and executive editor, The (Riverside, Calif.) Press- Enterprise; and Paul Knue, editor, The Cincinnati Post.
 PUBLIC SERVICE REPORTING
 FINALISTS, Over 100,000 Circulation Category: The Seattle Times; The Los Angeles Times; and The Washington Post.
 FINALISTS, Under 100,000 Circulation Category: The Bangor (Maine) Daily News; Birmingham (Ala.) Post-Herald; and The Lowell (Mass.) Sun.
 JUDGES: James G. Wieghart, Journalism Department, Central Michigan University; Dan K. Thomasson, vice president/news, Scripps Howard; and Betty Baye, editorial writer and columnist, The (Louisville, Ky.) Courier-Journal.
 SERVICE TO THE FIRST AMENDMENT
 FINALISTS: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; The Cincinnati Post; and The Bolivar Commercial, Cleveland, Miss.
 JUDGES: Lou Boccardi, president and CEO, The Associated Press; Cathleen Black, president and chief executive officer, Newspaper Association of America; and William R. Burleigh, executive vice president, Scripps Howard, and president, American Society of Newspaper Editors Foundation.
 SERVICE IN SUPPORT OF LITERACY
 FINALISTS: None
 JUDGES: Larry Hayes, president, Education Writers Association; Frank Denton, editor, Wisconsin State Journal; chairman of the American Society of Newspaper Editors Literacy Committee; and Tony Atwater, chairman, Department of Journalism, Rutgers University and president, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.
 EXCELLENCE IN BROADCAST/CABLE JOURNALISM
 -- LARGE MARKET TELEVISION
 Finalist: KDFW-TV, Dallas
 -- SMALL MARKET TELEVISION
 Finalist: WAFB-TV, Baton Rouge, La.
 -- LARGE MARKET RADIO
 Finalist: KINK-FM, Portland, Ore.
 -- SMALL MARKET RADIO
 Finalist: None
 JUDGES: Gary Hanson, news director, WKBN-TV, Youngstown, Ohio; Paul Nelson, dean, College of Communications, Ohio University; and William Drummond, professor, Graduate School of Journalism, University of California/Berkeley.
 -0- 3/8/93
 /CONTACT: Sue Porter of Scripps Howard, 513-977-3030/
 (SCRP)


CO: Scripps Howard ST: Ohio IN: PUB SU:

BM -- CL018 -- 4267 03/08/93 18:34 EST
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