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SCIENTISTS MEET AUTO INDUSTRY REPRESENTATIVES WITH GREAT SUCCESS

 ARGONNE, Ill., March 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Department of Energy's first attempt to meet the automotive industry on its home turf has been a success, according to a leading department official working in technology transfer.
 DOE's Director of Technology Utilization Roger Lewis told reporters at the Society of Automotive Engineers Exposition in Detroit, "We have seen substantial interest in the technologies we are demonstrating at this exposition. This is the first broad opportunity representatives from the automotive industry have had to see the kind of technologies DOE and its laboratories have to offer."
 In addition to an exhibit on the department's Technology Transfer program, DOE brought more than a dozen scientists and innovators to Detroit to demonstrate new technologies and their application to the automotive industry.
 Lewis went on to say, "Based on our positive experience here, we plan to


expand our efforts to other industries and to continue to bring scientists together with industry representatives to produce better goods and services, producing them faster, cheaper, and safer. We can make products which do not harm the environment and create new jobs in the process."
 Technologies featured in the DOE exhibit included:
 -- the magnescope, a technology developed at Ames Laboratory that can detect cracks and corrosion in almost any steel automobile component.
 -- new hydrogen fuels developed at the Savannah River site.
 -- crash-worthiness computer simulations, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, simulate how stress moves through structures. It has been used in car design, car safety studies, air bag studies, and the effects of a crash on drivers and passengers.
 -- zinc phosphate coating, developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, protects steel surfaces against rust and corrosion without using toxic substances such as chromium, cadmium or lead in an efficient one-step process.
 -- advanced batteries and electromechanical energy storage systems for future electric and hybrid vehicles developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory.
 -- gas-filled panels and photochromatic windows, developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, provide light, effective insulation and lighting control for vehicles.
 -- spray forming, developed at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, is a new materials processing technology that can make it easier and cheaper to produce prototypes for molds and dies such as those used to manufacture automobile parts.
 -- superplastic forming, researched at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is a single-step forming process which can reduce part and fastener counts.
 -- aerogels, researched by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, can provide lightweight heat and sound insulation.
 -- rapid response manufacturing software, developed at Allied Signal, permits desk-top manufacturing with wide applications to industrial machining.
 -- instrumented head gasket, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, provides information regarding the combustion process.
 -- cybertran light rail system, under development at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, provides low-cost high-speed rail options for communities.
 -- polymer multilayer coatings for auto windows, developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, reduce heat and air-conditioning loads.
 -- alternative fuels data base, developed at the National Renewable Engineering Laboratory, monitors data collected from alternative fuel fleets.
 -- thin film capacitors, developed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, offer advanced electronic applications to the automotive industry.
 -- advanced computer modeling and simulations developed at Argonne National Laboratory apply to the automotive industry; and
 -- plastics recycling of scrapped cars developed at Argonne National Laboratory.
 -0- 3/4/93
 /CONTACT: Elizabeth Toby of DOE, 313-570-2746/


CO: Department of Energy ST: Michigan, Illinois IN: AUT SU:

DH -- DE039 -- 3189 03/04/93 17:14 EST
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Date:Mar 4, 1993
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