Printer Friendly

Roche Holding AG's arthritis and lymphoma medicine Rituxan cut the need for insulin treatment among patients with type 1 diabetes after a year, a study found.

Roche Holding AG's arthritis and lymphoma medicine Rituxan cut the need for insulin treatment among patients with type 1 diabetes after a year, a study found. Four doses of Rituxan partly maintained the functioning of the beta cells that produce insulin in recently-diagnosed patients, a study in the New England Journal of Medicine found. The drug also cut levels of blood sugar and B lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell that diabetics may have in excess. The study shows that a therapy that targets B lymphocytes may help the functioning of the beta cells that make and release insulin, a hormone that controls the level of sugar in the blood. The study also found that insulin levels began to decline again after the initial improvement and other compounds that target B cells should be tested against the condition. Rituxan, also known as rituximab, is in the second of three phases of clinical testing needed for regulatory approval as a treatment for the condition.

"It is unlikely that treatment with rituximab as administered in this study would be optimal," researchers led by Mark Pescovitz at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis said in the study. Developed by Genentech Inc., which Roche fully acquired earlier this year, Rituxan is approved for use in both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis. The drug in February won European regulatory backing as a leukemia treatment. Rituxan generated 1.51 billion Swiss francs ($1.5 billion) in sales during the third quarter. While there were more adverse events among patients given their first dose of Rituxan compared with those given a placebo, the reactions appeared to be "minimal," the study found.
COPYRIGHT 2009 MedContent Media, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2009 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY
Publication:MondayMorning
Article Type:Brief article
Date:Nov 30, 2009
Words:277
Previous Article:Women younger than 65 years old and men younger than 55 with acute chest pain benefit most from cardiac CT angiography (CTA) for suspected acute...
Next Article:The number of Americans with diabetes may almost double in 25 years, and the annual cost of treating them may triple to $336 billion, according to a...
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters