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Rhodiola offsets effects of stress.

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The herb Rhodiola rosea has long been valued as a potent adaptogen (agent that strengthens the body's response to stress) and has traditionally been used to improve mental and physical performance. New findings in rodents confirm rhodiola's ability to offset stress-induced anxiety, depression, and loss of appetite. (1,2)

In one study, a single oral dose of rhodiola produced significant antidepressant and anti-anxiety effects in stressed mice. "This study ... confirms manypreclinical and clinical studies indicating the adaptogenic and stimulating effects of ... R. rosea," wrote the researchers. (1)

In a second study, physical and psychological stressors caused laboratory rats to stop eating. Rhodiola administration reversed the animals' loss of appetite. Control animals, which were either free-feeding or food deprived, did not change their eating behavior in response to rhodiola, indicating that the herb " ... is able selectively to attenuate stress-induced anorexia." (2)

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Rhodiola thus has broad spectrum potential to alleviate a number of human miseries, including hospital-induced appetite suppression that causes so many confined patients to become malnourished.

Reference

(1.) Perfumi M, Mattioli L. Adaptogenic and central nervous system effects of single doses of 3% rosavin and 1% alidroside Rhodiola rosea L. extract in mice. Phytother Res. 2007 Jan;21(1):37-43.

(2.) Mattioli L, Perfumi M. Rhodiola rosea L. extract reduces stress- and CRF-induced anorexia in rats. J Psychopharmacol. 2007 Jan 26; [Epub ahead of print].
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Article Details
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Title Annotation:In The NEWS
Author:Kiefer, Dale
Publication:Life Extension
Article Type:Brief article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Aug 1, 2007
Words:229
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